Power Politics

Power Politics

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by Arundhati Roy
     
 

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Arundhati Roy -"India's most impassioned critic of globalization" (New York Times)-has expanded the compelling first edition of Power Politics with two new essays on the U.S. war on terrorism. A Book Sense 76 choice for November/December 2001 and Los Angeles Times "Discoveries" selection, Power Politics challenges the idea that only

Overview

Arundhati Roy -"India's most impassioned critic of globalization" (New York Times)-has expanded the compelling first edition of Power Politics with two new essays on the U.S. war on terrorism. A Book Sense 76 choice for November/December 2001 and Los Angeles Times "Discoveries" selection, Power Politics challenges the idea that only experts can speak out on such urgent matters as nuclear war, the privatization of India's power supply by U.S.-based energy companies, and the construction of monumental dams in India.

Arundhati Roy, the internationally acclaimed author of The God of Small Things, brings her keen novelist's eye to her analysis of the tragic events of September 11 and the military response, starting with the U.S. bombing of Afghanistan.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
This second nonfiction book from the author of the acclaimed novel The God of Small Things returns to the subject she first explored in The Cost of Living: what she sees as the iniquity of globalization and the dangers of privatization, particularly in dam construction. In this slim yet meandering volume of three essays, Roy also criticizes an American energy company and the Indian government for allowing big business to make money privatizing electricity in a country where hundreds of millions lack any electricity. Roy's activism against the construction of dams that displace hundreds of thousands, especially the poor and low-caste, earned her a contempt of court citation from India's Supreme Court. She includes here her response, "On the Writer's Freedom of Imagination," but little context or explanation is given to help readers situate it. Likewise, Roy's other two short essays, ostensibly about the role of the writer (or "writer-activist," as she puts it) in society, criticize development, trade and global finance. Although her passion and agitation on these issues is commendable, her writing lacks analysis, and her generalized outrage and hyperbole make much of her criticism wooden. She tends to switch between issues of trade and her fame, losing the reader. The three pieces seem thrown together haphazardly, with no editorial explanation of how they originated (all are available on the Web) or in what context. (Sept.) Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780896086562
Publisher:
South End Press
Publication date:
09/12/2001
Edition description:
Older Edition
Pages:
128
Product dimensions:
5.40(w) x 8.54(h) x 0.42(d)

Meet the Author

Arundhati Roy wowed critics with her writing debut, The God of Small Things, which won the Booker Prize in 1998. She has also published several collections of essays The Cost of Living, Power Politics and most recently War Talk. Ms. Roy is an outspoken critic of India's nuclear weapons testing, controversial environmental issues and the US "war on terrorism".

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Power Politics (Second Edition) 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The essay 'Algebra of Infinite Justice' is powerful. A must read. I am forever grateful for Arundhati Roy for keeping me sane at times where I thought I was crazy because no one else seemed to think the same way I did.