Power Programming with RPC

Overview

RPC, or remote procedure calling, is the ability to distribute parts of a program to other computers on a network. An RPC facility manages the exchange of data between computers to make remote execution tranparent to the user. Distributed applications based on RPC can utilize distributed network resources and increase significantly the computing power brought to bear on complex problems. An RPC facility is the fundamental element of a distributed computing environment.

The book ...

See more details below
Paperback (New Edition)
$28.16
BN.com price
(Save 5%)$29.95 List Price
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (40) from $1.99   
  • New (5) from $16.75   
  • Used (35) from $1.99   
Sending request ...

Overview

RPC, or remote procedure calling, is the ability to distribute parts of a program to other computers on a network. An RPC facility manages the exchange of data between computers to make remote execution tranparent to the user. Distributed applications based on RPC can utilize distributed network resources and increase significantly the computing power brought to bear on complex problems. An RPC facility is the fundamental element of a distributed computing environment.

The book builds a working understanding of RPC programming through examples. Sun RPC, the de facto standard on UNIX systems, is covered in detail. Interprocess communication and other related UNIX programming topics are also covered.

The standard-issue RPC documentation is difficult to understand and lacks real-world examples. There are, in addition, many techniques to learn. This book, written from a programmer's perspective, shows you what you can do with RPC and presents a framework for learning it.

Contents include:

  • Foundations of remote procedure calling; what it is, how it works, and which vendors support it.
  • What RPC offers to application and product developers.
    How RPC fits into a distributed computing environment.
  • ONC and DCE, a comparison of their similarities and differences.
  • How to develop, debug, and deploy networked applications.
  • Understanding the interprocess control (IPC) mechanisms on which RPC is based.
  • Using remote procedure calling in parallel/distributed processing and scheduling.
  • Using remote procedure calling with windowing systems.
  • Examples of distributed applications using both single and multiple concurrent servers.

Written from a programmer's perspective, this book shows what you can do with Sun RPC, the de facto standard on UNIX systems. It covers related programming topics for Sun and other UNIX systems and teaches through examples.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Booknews
RPC, or remote procedure calling, is the ability to distribute parts of a program to other computers on a network. Two major distributed computing environments are proposed as emerging standards: the Open Networking Consortium (ONC) and the Open Software Foundation's DCE. This book examines both from a programmer's perspective, showing what can be done with RPC and providing examples. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780937175774
  • Publisher: O'Reilly Media, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 2/1/1992
  • Series: Nutshell Handbooks Series
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Pages: 522
  • Sales rank: 1,029,869
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 8.97 (h) x 1.48 (d)

Meet the Author

John Bloomer currently develops network multimedia and imaging applications for GE's Signal and Image Coding R&D group. He has experience designing VLSI chips and design automation tools and has developed hardware and software for graphics and signal processing systems. John often lectures on programming for distributed computing with a second O'Reilly book on DCE RPC underway.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Scope of This Handbook
Some Assumptions About the Reader
Software Mentioned in This Book
Examples
Additional Sources of Information
Conventions
Acknowledgments

Chapter 1: Introduction to Remote Procedure Calling
Client /Server Computing
Remote versus Local Procedure Calling
RPC Application Development
Defining the Protocol
Developing Server and Client Application Code
Compiling and Running the Application
RPC Makes Interprocess Communications Less Painful
How RPC Systems Work
RPC Systems and the OSI Reference Model
What is "State" and Why is it Important?
Top Twenty Distributed Computing Terms and Acronyms

Chapter 2: Network Computing Today
Distributed Computing Standards
Features of a Distributed Computing Environment
NCS
ONC
Examining ONC and NCS
Machine-independent Data Representation
RPC Mechanism
Protocol Compilers: The Most Important Feature
Authentication Services
Network Resource Naming Services
Network Time Service
Distributed File System
There May be a Common Application Environment in Your Future
Netwise: A Second ONC Alternative
Machine-independent Data Representation
RPC Mechanism
Protocol Compiler
Authentication Services
Network Resource Naming Services
Network Time Service
Distributed File System
Summary of Distributed Computing Environments
Rapid Evolution
Which One Should You Choose?
Put the ONC Suite on Your Machine for Free

Chapter 3: Developing High-level RPC Applications
Development Overview
From Local to Remote Directory Reading
Define the Protocol
Data Types
Program, Procedure, and Version Numbers
High-level ONC RPC Library Calls
At the Server
At the Client
Shared XDR Routines
Using the XDR Library
Writing the Client and Server Programs
At the Server
At the Client
Compile, Link, and Run
Why High-level Calls and Not Protocol Compiling?
Some Limitations of the High-level Calls
TCP Transport Requires Lower-level Calls

Chapter 4: Protocol Compiling and Lower-level RPC Programming
Development Overview
Filename Conventions and Make
Using RPCGEN
The Protocol Definition Language
Definitions
Symbolic Constants
Enumerations
Structures
Unions
Typedefs
Programs
Declarations
Special Cases
Booleans
Strings
Opaque Data
Voids
Preprocessor Symbols and Control
Lower-level ONC RPC Library Calls
At the Client
At the Server
An Example: One Client Talks to One Server
Debugging
Step 1: Debug Without the Network
Step 2: Use the Raw Transport
Step 3: Debug Over the Network
Deploying Servers During Development
Real RPC Power Means Using IPC

Chapter 5: UNIX Networking and Interprocess Communication
A Network Protocol Primer
Internet Addressing
Connectionless at the Lowest Level
Internet Protocols
Applications Protocols
Connections and Well-known Ports
Types of Servers
Network Transport Selection: UDP or TCP?
Adding a Server to the System
inetd and Other Lurking Network Daemons
Installing a Server Yourself
A Digression on Remote Execution Daemons
Configuring inetd
An Overview of UNIX Interprocess Communication
Pipes and FIFOs
Message Queues, Semaphores, and Shared Memory
Berkeley Sockets and System V TLI
Data Representation or Byte Ordering
Retrieving Host, Network, and Address Information
Getting ONC RPC Information
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)