Power That Preserves

Power That Preserves

4.6 17
by Stephen R. Donaldson
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

"A trilogy of remarkable scope and sophistication."
LOS ANGELES TIMES
Twice before Thomas Covenant had been summoned to the strange other-world where magic worked. Twice before he had been forced to join with the Lords of Revelstone in their war against Lord Foul, the ancient enemy of the Land. Now he was back. This time the Lords of Revelstone were desperate.…  See more details below

Overview

"A trilogy of remarkable scope and sophistication."
LOS ANGELES TIMES
Twice before Thomas Covenant had been summoned to the strange other-world where magic worked. Twice before he had been forced to join with the Lords of Revelstone in their war against Lord Foul, the ancient enemy of the Land. Now he was back. This time the Lords of Revelstone were desperate. Without hope, Covenant set out to confront the might of the enemy, as Lord Foul grew more powerful with every defeat for the Land....

Editorial Reviews

Gale Research
Writing in A Reader's Guide to Fantasy, Baird Searles, Beth Meachem, and Michael Franklin describe Covenant as "one of the most unusual protagonists in modern fantasy. He is a leper, bitter at the way fate and friends have treated him, and definitely not your typical hero." "Covenant is Donaldson's genius," John Calvin Batchelor of the Village Voice believes, "and I would be delinquent if I didn't say that although Donaldson writes dense and strangled prose, Chronicles has, at its heart, an unqualifiedly sublime idea--that the last shall be first." <

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780307818669
Publisher:
Random House Publishing Group
Publication date:
05/16/2012
Series:
First Chronicles: Thomas Covenant the Unbeliever , #3
Sold by:
Random House
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
512
Sales rank:
33,910
File size:
2 MB

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

The Power That Preserves (First Chronicles Series #3) 4.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 17 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
i have tried to get into reading and never seem to finish entire books,but the entire six novel set was so good that i read the first and second chronicles of thomas covenant within a months time and had trouble booking the books down at night,some say its over rated but i feel like its the best set of fantasy novels i ever read,most will always favor the hobbit series as the best fantasy series ever but i am going against the crowd on this one,Stephen Donaldson makes you feel like you have been to this world with the depth of detail he uses to describe everything
Anonymous 10 months ago
The secondary attempts with Thomas Covenent left me dry. It should have stopped with "The Power That Persevers." I did not like Linden and I hurt on what happened to the Land. I now have gone back to the start and I'm enchanted.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I had read Donaldson's books many years ago and it was a joy to find them available from the nook. Even better the second time around. He paints an extraordinary vision of the character Covenant as the unwilling hero, the hero you can feel in yourself. I recommend this not only as a fun read, but a great read for any high school student.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
I enjoyed this series because of it's characters are so full of emotion and pain. This is a book worth checking out.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Being the last book of the first chronicles of thomas covenant, I'd like to say something that applies to the entire first chronicles and that is, that reading this trilogy was an experience. It is non-conventional, briliantly descriptive towards the land as well as the characters and most of all true. There were true characters, true grief & joy, which left the reader in an emotional involvement, that I haven't experienced before. I never got mad, while reading a book in my life before but I did threw the Illearth War as well as the Power that Preserves in the corner, because it simply outraged me. The thing is that you have to keep reading, it doesn't let you go and no matter how frustrating the story gets, you need to know more, you want to stay in it. One simply doesn't have a choice; when you start it, you'll have to finish it. I though it was unbelieveably powerfull; a true emotional journey
Guest More than 1 year ago
In the last daunting book of the First Chronicles of Thomas Covenant, you are dragged through this man's most troublesome and trying times. Your beliefs about humanity's strength and it's triumphs are displayed in the magnificent attributes of Covenant. Never have I felt so highly of a main character in all the books I've read. As a high school student, I am reading it again to move onto the Second Chronicles. I recommend faith for this last book because I found it very hard to accept things the way they were in this plot. Overall, it is one of the greatest books I've ever read and probably ever will read again.
Guest More than 1 year ago
In 'The Power That Preserves', Thomas Covenant returns to the Land a third time to find it ravaged by and almost subjugated by Lord Foul. All that stands between Lord Foul and his ultimate victory are Revelstone and a few small renegade bands. The great fortress Revelstone, weakened, having lost its elite guard, the Bloodguard, and unable to grow food due to a fierce, unnatural winter, is forced to rely on its quickly dwindling stores. And so, Covenant finds that the fate of the Land lies upon himself and the mighty wild magic of his White Gold ring, which he still has no idea how to use or control.

Donaldson uses conflict well in this story. Covenant is unaccepted in his society, as a leper. In the Land, there is obvious conflict between Foul and the defenders of the Land. There is also conflict within Covenant, feeling guilty for all the deaths and suffering he feels he causes in the Land, and in that he feels that the Land is too good to be real, too good for a leper. He does not believe it is real, and yet he feels he must still act to try to save the Land and those he meets in it. There are, of course, several other, smaller conflicts which give the book its rich story. The conflicts Donaldson uses, and the interactions between them, help the reader to get a feel for the theme. The conflict between Covenant and society shows how, in our world, he is seen as a symbol of evil, being a leper. In the Land, Covenant is seen as a hero, a savior. These two things interact to cause Covenant's internal conflicts. He is dragged into the conflict in the Land, despite how inadequate he feels. Covenant himself feels he is more the damnation to the Land than the redemption. Like Covenant, we understand that, even though we may not feel adequate, we can still overcome the conflicts in our life. Even though we may not be (adequate), evil can still be overcome¿ Be not so quick to judge.