PowerPoint Advanced Presentation Techniques / Edition 1

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Overview

* The first and only book to focus exclusively on advanced PowerPoint techniques, this latest addition to our successful Power Pack series shows veteran users how to harness sophisticated program features-and take their presentations to the next level
* Techniques covered include putting together design templates and color schemes, working with master layouts, importing and manipulating digital photos and video clips, creating sophisticated animation and transition effects, and building interactive Web-based presentations
* The CD-ROM offers add-ins, utilities, background images, presentation templates, sound effects, animated image clips, third party software toolboxes, presentation libraries, sound effects, and much more
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780764568817
  • Publisher: Wiley
  • Publication date: 7/28/2004
  • Edition description: BK&CD-ROM
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 600
  • Product dimensions: 7.40 (w) x 9.20 (h) x 1.35 (d)

Meet the Author

Faithe Wempen is a Microsoft Office Master Instructor with over 80 computer books to her credit. She is an associate instructor of Computer Information Technology at Purdue University, and reviews Microsoft Office Specialist certification exams for CertCities.com.

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgments.

Introduction.

PART I. THE BIG PICTURE DESIGN.

Chapter 1. PowerPoint in a Nutshell.

Chapter 2. Working with Templates and Color Schemes.

Chapter 3. Working with Masters and Layouts.

PART II. CONVEYING THE MESSAGE.

Chapter 4. Importing and Organizing Text.

Chapter 5. Attractive Text Placement.

Chapter 6. Tables and Worksheet Grids.

PART III. STILL IMAGES.

Chapter 7. Drawing Tools and Graphic Effects.

Chapter 8. Working with Photographic Images.

Chapter 9. Using and Organizing Artwork Libraries.

Chapter 10. Working with Diagrams and Org Charts.

Chapter 11. Using the Charting Tools.

PART IV. MOTION IMAGES AND EFFECTS.

Chapter 12. Sound Effects, Soundtracks, and Narration.

Chapter 13. Using Transitions and Animation Effects.

Chapter 14. Incorporating Motion Video.

PART V. PREPARING AND PRESENTING A SHOW.

Chapter 15. Managing the Presentation Process.

Chapter 16. Attractive Handouts and Speaker Notes.

Chapter 17. User-Interactive and Web-Based Shows.

PART VI. EXTENDING POWERPOINT.

Chapter 18. Custom Work Environments: Menus and Toolbars.

Chapter 19. Working with Macros and Add-Ins.

PART VII. APPENDICES.

Appendix A. New Features in PowerPoint 2003.

Appendix B. PowerPoint Resources Online.

Appendix C. What’s on the CD-ROM.

Index.

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First Chapter

PowerPoint Advanced Presentation Techniques


By Faithe Wempen

John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 0-7645-6881-7


Chapter One

PowerPoint in a Nutshell

IN THIS CHAPTER

* Why use PowerPoint?

* The PowerPoint interface

* Working with views * Controlling the display

* Using content placeholders

* Selecting and manipulating slides

* Managing presentation files

New to PowerPoint? Start here. Before diving head-first into some of the more advanced topics in the rest of the book, let's spend a few pages reviewing some of the basic "must-knows" about the application.

Why Use PowerPoint?

I was talking to a new acquaintance recently at a party who had just discovered PowerPoint. As a graphic artist back in the 1980s for one of the "big three" TV networks, she had spent many years creating presentation graphics and overlays for commercials and TV shows. She was so excited about PowerPoint's capabilities! "With PowerPoint, I can do in 2 minutes by myself what it would take a staff of 20 people a whole week to do," she told me.

That's PowerPoint's appeal, in a nutshell. It does all these amazing graphical things that make presentation graphics really shine, and it does them so easily and quickly that it puts the power of creation in almost anyone's hands.

PowerPoint is a very popular tool among people who give presentations as part of their jobs, as well as for their support staff. With PowerPoint, you can create visual aids that will help get the message across to an audience, whatever that message may be and whatever format it may be presented in. The following are just a few of the types of presentations you can have:

* Speaker-led: The most traditional kind of presentation is a live speech presented at a podium. For live presentations, you can use PowerPoint to create overhead transparencies, 35 mm slides, or computer-based shows that can help the lecturer emphasize key points.

* Self-running: Over the last several years, advances in technology have made it possible to give several other kinds of presentations, and PowerPoint has kept pace nicely. You can use PowerPoint to create kiosk shows, for example, which are self-running presentations that provide information in an unattended location. You have probably seen such presentations listing meeting times and rooms in hotel lobbies and giving sales presentations at trade show booths.

* Internet: The Internet has also made several other presentation formats possible. You can use PowerPoint to create a show that you can store on a Web or intranet server so that people can watch it at their own leisure from anywhere in the world.

Can you create presentation support materials without PowerPoint? Certainly. You could make a Word document where each page was a "slide," or you could create a Web-based presentation with Web page creation software like Microsoft FrontPage or Macromedia Dreamweaver, for example. But it wouldn't be nearly as easy as it is with PowerPoint, and the results would probably not be as professional. PowerPoint is somewhat of a one-trick pony in the business software arena. It does one thing really well: make presentation materials.

NOTE PowerPoint 2003 is a member of the Microsoft Office 2003 suite of programs. A suite is a group of programs designed by a single manufacturer to work well together. Like its siblings Word (the word processor), Excel (the spreadsheet), Outlook (the personal organizer and e-mail manager), and Access (the database), PowerPoint has a well-defined role in the family. Because PowerPoint is so tightly integrated with the other Microsoft Office 2003 components, you can easily share information among them. For example, if you have created a graph in Excel, you can use that graph on a PowerPoint slide. It goes the other way too. You can, for example, take the handouts from your PowerPoint presentation and export them to Word, where you can dress them up with Word's powerful document formatting commands. Virtually any piece of data in any Office program can be linked to any other Office program, so you never have to worry about your data being in the wrong format.

The PowerPoint Interface

PowerPoint is a fairly typical Windows-based program in many ways. It contains the same basic elements that you expect to see: title bar, menu bar, window controls, and so on. And like all Office 2003 applications, it has a task pane that provides shortcuts for common activities. Here's a quick rundown of some basic elements, which are shown in Figure 1-1.

* Toolbars: The Standard and Formatting toolbars appear at the top, and the Drawing toolbar at the bottom, by default. Other toolbars come and go automatically as needed, and they can also be displayed or hidden by right-clicking any visible toolbar and choosing from the menu that appears.

* Task pane: This pane pops up on its own for certain activities as well as when PowerPoint starts. You can also display or hide it manually from the View menu.

* Slide pane: This is where the PowerPoint slide(s) that you are working on appear.

* View buttons: Near the bottom left corner of the screen are some tiny icons for switching back and forth between the various views. (More on views shortly.)

* Tabs: In Normal view (which is shown in Figure 1-1), the left-hand pane has two tabs: Outline and Slides. (In this book I refer to that pane as the Outline/Slides pane.) Each shows a different view of the list of slides in the presentation.

TIP

If you have only a single row of toolbar buttons at the top of your screen, the Standard and Formatting toolbars are probably all bunched up on a single row together. That's the default for PowerPoint (unfortunately, in my opinion). To place them on two separate rows, choose Tools Customize, and on the Options tab, mark the Show Standard and Formatting toolbars on two rows checkbox. Another default setting you will probably want to change before going much further is to turn off the Personalized Menus feature. It's the one that hides some of the menu commands when you first open menus. To turn that off, choose Tools_Customize again, and on the Options tab, mark the Always show full menus checkbox.

Working with Views

A view is a way of displaying your presentation on-screen. PowerPoint comes with several views because at different times during the creation process, it is helpful to look at the presentation in different ways. For example, when you are adding a graphic to a slide, you will want to be able to work closely with that individual slide, but when you need to rearrange the slide order, you will want to see the entire presentation as a whole.

PowerPoint offers the following views:

* Normal: This is a combination of several resizable panes, so you can see the presentation in multiple ways at once. Normal is the default view and was shown in Figure 1-1. Each of the panes in Normal view has its own scroll bar, so you can move around in the outline, the slide, and the Notes panes independently of the other panes.

* Slide Sorter: This is a light-table type overhead view of all the slides in your presentation, laid out in rows, suitable for big-picture rearranging (see Figure 1-2).

NOTE

Here's a funny little quirk. Even if you choose to show the Standard and Formatting toolbars on two rows, the two toolbars in Slide Sorter view will still appear on a single row by default. In Slide Sorter view, the toolbars at the top are Standard and Slide Sorter. To make them appear on two rows as shown in Figure 1-2, drag the Slide Sorter toolbar down below the Standard toolbar by dragging its "handle"-that is, the vertical row of dots at its left end.

* Notes Page: This is a view with the slide at the top of the page and a text box below it for typed notes to yourself. (You can print these notes pages to use during your speech.) See Figure 1-3.

* Slide Show: This is the view you use to show the presentation to an audience on a computer screen. Each slide fills the entire screen in its turn.

In some earlier versions of PowerPoint there were also Outline and Slide views, but these have been combined into Normal view. The tabs in the Outline/Slides pane in the Normal view switch back and forth between viewing the presentation's text outline and viewing thumbnail images of the slides, and these serve the same purpose as those older views did. You can resize the space allocation among the panes by dragging the borders between them.

There are two ways to change the view: open the View menu and select a view, or click one of the View buttons in the bottom left corner of the screen, as pointed out in Figure 1-1. All of the views are available in both places except Notes Page; it can be accessed only from the View menu.

Controlling the Display

As with anything, it's easier to work with PowerPoint when you can clearly see what you're doing. Here are some tips for making the display show the elements you want to see.

Customizing the Normal View Panes

In Normal view, you can adjust the sizes of the panes relative to one another by dragging the borders between them. To get rid of one of the panes entirely, drag the border between it and the adjacent pane so that it is as small as possible. For example, in Figure 1-4 I've dragged the bar between the Slide pane and the Notes pane down all the way to the bottom, so the Notes pane is completely hidden, and I've increased the width of the Outline tab's section. The Outline/Slides pane also has an X in its top-right corner that you can click to close it.

To restore any panes you've hidden, reselect Normal view from the View menu. This does not restore the sizes of any panes you resized, nor does it reopen the task pane. (Choose View-Task Pane to do that.)

Setting the Zoom

If you need a closer look at your presentation, you can zoom the view in or out to accommodate almost any situation. For example, if you have trouble placing a graphic exactly at the same vertical level as some text in a box adjacent to it, you might zoom in for more precision. You can view your work at various magnifications on-screen without changing the size of the surrounding tools or the size of the print on the printout.

In a single-pane view like Notes Page or Slide Sorter, a single zoom setting affects the entire work area. In Normal view, each of the panes has its own individual zoom. To set the zoom for the Outline/Slides pane only, for example, select that pane first by clicking inside it, and then choose a zoom level. Or to zoom only in the slide pane, click it first.

TIP Instead of clicking a pane in the Normal view to switch to it, you can press F6 to move clockwise among the panes or Shift+F6 to move counterclockwise. You can also use Ctrl+Shift+Tab to switch between the Slides and Outline tabs of the Outline/Slides pane.

The easiest way to set the zoom level is to open the Zoom drop-down list on the Standard toolbar and choose a new level, as shown in Figure 1-5. You can also type a specific zoom percentage into that box; you aren't limited to the choices on the list. (However, some panes do limit you to 100% as the highest zoom level.)

The default zoom setting for the Slide pane (Normal view) is Fit, which means the zoom dynamically adjusts so that the entire slide fits in the Slide pane and is as large as possible. If you drag the dividers between the panes to redistribute the screen space, the size of the slide in the Slide pane adjusts too, so that you continue to see the whole slide. You can change the zoom to whatever you like and then return to the default by choosing Fit as the zoom amount.

The larger the zoom number, the larger things appear on-screen. A zoom of 10% would make the slide so tiny you couldn't read it. A zoom of 400% would make the slide so big that a few letters on a slide would fill the entire pane. The main advantage to zooming out is to fit more on the screen at once. For example, if you're working with a lot of slides in Slide Sorter view and normally can see three slides per row, zooming out to 33% might let you see eight or more slides on each row. The disadvantage, of course, is that if the slides get too small, as shown in Figure 1-6, you can't read the text or tell the slides apart from each other.

Another way to control the zoom is with the Zoom dialog box. Select View-Zoom to open it. Make your selection, as shown in Figure 1-7, by clicking the appropriate button, and then click OK. Notice that you can type a precise zoom percentage in the Percent text box. This is the same as typing a percentage directly into the Zoom text box on the Standard toolbar.

Displaying and Hiding Screen Elements

PowerPoint has a lot of optional screen elements that you may (or may not) find useful, depending on what you're up to at the moment. In the following sections I'll show you the most common ones and explain how to toggle them on and off.

RULERS

Vertical and horizontal rules around the Slide pane can help you place objects more precisely. The rulers aren't displayed by default, however; you have to turn them on. To do so, select View_Ruler. Do the same thing again to turn them off. Rulers are available only in Normal and Notes Page views.

Rulers help with positioning no matter what content type you are working with, but when you're editing text in a text frame, they have an additional purpose as well. The horizontal ruler shows the frame's paragraph indents, and you can drag the indent markers on the ruler just like in Word (see Figure 1-8). Control those indents more precisely by holding the Ctrl key while dragging them.

Notice in Figure 1-8 that the rulers start with 0 as the spot in the top-left corner of the selected frame, and they run down to the right from there. When an object other than a text frame is selected, or when no object is selected at all, the ruler's numbering changes. It starts with 0 at the center of the slide vertically and horizontally and runs out in both directions from those midpoints.

GRID AND GUIDES

Guides are on-screen dotted lines that can help you line up objects on a slide. For example, if you want to center some text exactly in the middle of the slide, you can place the object exactly at the intersection of the guide lines.

Continues...


Excerpted from PowerPoint Advanced Presentation Techniques by Faithe Wempen Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 23, 2004

    complement to Tufte's classic text

    This book wants to take you beyond simple bullet points of text in PowerPoint. Most of the discussion involves using images in some clean way. It is here that you might run into problems, when attempting this for the first time. Wempen goes into a fair amount of detail. All the way from making artworking libraries to adding motion video. The latter can be especially attention grabbing to your audience, if done well. I would compare this book to Tufte's classic 'The Visual Display of Quantitative Information'. That book is independent of any editing tool or software. Leaving it free to focus strictly on teaching general guidelines. Wempen's book does speak to some of these guidelines. But the bulk of the book concentrates on the details of using PowerPoint. A nice complement to Tufte's book.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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