Powhatan's World and Colonial Virginia: A Conflict of Cultures

Overview

Drawing on the latest anthropological studies of colonial encounters, Frederic Gleach offers a more balanced and complete accounting of the early years of the Jamestown colony than has been seen before. When English colonists established their first permanent settlement at Jamestown in 1607, they confronted a powerful and growing native chiefdom consisting of over thirty tribes under one paramount chief, Powhatan. For the next half century, a portion of the Middle Atlantic coastal plain became a charged and often...
See more details below
Paperback
$21.58
BN.com price
(Save 9%)$23.95 List Price
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (13) from $9.39   
  • New (7) from $13.57   
  • Used (6) from $9.39   
Sending request ...

Overview

Drawing on the latest anthropological studies of colonial encounters, Frederic Gleach offers a more balanced and complete accounting of the early years of the Jamestown colony than has been seen before. When English colonists established their first permanent settlement at Jamestown in 1607, they confronted a powerful and growing native chiefdom consisting of over thirty tribes under one paramount chief, Powhatan. For the next half century, a portion of the Middle Atlantic coastal plain became a charged and often violent meeting ground between two very different worlds. Gleach argues that the history of Jamestown is essentially the story of how two cultures civilize and incorporate each other. He examines historical events from both native and colonial perspectives, resulting in original, fuller interpretations of seventeenth-century Virginia history.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

American Anthropologist
“Anyone who thinks that ethnohistory is dull and descriptive, or that the subdisciplines of anthropology cannot be brought to bear on particular historical cases, must read Frederic Gleach’s reassessment of the contact between the confederacy of the Powhatan and the settlers at Jamestown, Virginia. Gleach attributes the ensuing conflict to incommensurable worldviews rather than to competition for scarce resources. Colonists and Indians largely misunderstood one another without realizing that they did so, all the while undertaking ‘mutual attempts to civilize each other.’ . . . A fascinating book.”—American Anthropologist
Journal of Southern History
Powhatan’s World and Colonial Virginia is likely to be the focus of spirited discussion for years to come. New interpretations of long-discussed events appear in literally every chapter.”—Journal of Southern History
Read More Show Less

Product Details

Meet the Author

Frederic W. Gleach is a visiting assistant professor in the Department of Anthropology at Cornell University.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

List of Figures
Preface
Introduction 1
1 The Native Context 22
2 The English Colonial Context 61
3 Prolegomena 88
4 The Birth of Virginia in Tsenacommacah 106
5 Virginia before the 1622 Coup 123
6 "The Great Massacre of 1622" 148
7 Virginia between the Coups 159
8 The Coup of 1644 and Its Aftermath 174
9 A Survey of Virginia Indian Relations after 1646 184
Conclusion 199
Notes 207
References 213
Index 235
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)