PR 2.0: New Media, New Tools, New Audiences [NOOK Book]

Overview

Praise for PR 2.0

“An ‘easy read’ filled with practical examples of how marketing professionals can leverage these new tools to enhance PR activities. The ‘Interviews with the Experts’ sections were especially useful in helping to highlight how companies have benefited from PR2.0.”

Maura Mahoney, Senior Director, RCN Metro Optical Networks

P.R. 2.0 is a must-read for any marketing or PR professional. It is ...

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PR 2.0: New Media, New Tools, New Audiences

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Overview

Praise for PR 2.0

“An ‘easy read’ filled with practical examples of how marketing professionals can leverage these new tools to enhance PR activities. The ‘Interviews with the Experts’ sections were especially useful in helping to highlight how companies have benefited from PR2.0.”

Maura Mahoney, Senior Director, RCN Metro Optical Networks

P.R. 2.0 is a must-read for any marketing or PR professional. It is filled with expert advice, real-world examples, and practical guidance to help us better understand the new media tools and social networking concepts available and how we can use them for our specific branding needs. This book is excellent for someone who is trying to understand the new web-based media and social networking concepts, as well those who are experienced in applying the new media tools and are curious about what everyone else is doing and what tools are producing the best ROI. This isn’t a book filled with simple tips and tricks--it’s an essential guidebook for the marketing/PR professional to better understand the new media options and how to apply them effectively to achieve results.”

Jenny Fisher, Director Sales and Marketing Operations, Catalent Pharma Solutions

“Wading through the thicket of expanding Internet tools--from MySpace to Facebook, from Twitter to Flickr--is no easy challenge. And once you finally understand these strange new art forms, how the heck do you harness them? Answer: You buy this book. Deirdre Breakenridge knows the Net--how to measure it, monitor it, and use it to maximize public relations performance. Best of all, she explains it in a style that even a Luddite can comprehend.”

Fraser P. Seitel, author of The Practice of Public Relations and coauthor of IdeaWise

The New Future of Public Relations!

In today’s Web 2.0 world, traditional methods of communication won’t reach your audiences, much less convince them. Here’s the good news: Powerful new tools offer you an unprecedented opportunity to start a meaningful two-way conversation with everyone who matters to you. In PR 2.0, Deirdre Breakenridge helps you master these tools and use them to the fullest possible advantage in all your public relations work.

You’ll learn the best ways to utilize blogs, social networking, online newswires, RSS technology, podcasts, and the rest of today’s Web 2.0 tools. Breakenridge shows how to choose the right strategies for each PR scenario and environment, keep the best Web 1.0 tools, and stop using outmoded tactics that have rapidly become counterproductive.

Breakenridge introduces an extraordinary array of new PR best practices, including setting up online newsrooms, using visual and social media in releases, and leveraging new online research and analytics tools. She offers powerful new ways to think about PR, plan for it, and react to the new PR challenges the Web presents. Breakenridge also includes interviews with today’s leading PR 2.0 practitioners.

PR 1.0 vs. PR 2.0

Identify the needs of companies and clients, and how to integrate them for greatest effectiveness

Reaching today’s crucial wired media

Powerful new strategies for pitching and media distribution

Best uses of traditional PR tactics

Better ways to use viral marketing, online newsletters, e-blasts, VNRs, and webcasts

PR 2.0: Making the most of the newest tools

Interactive online newsrooms, visual media, blogs, RSS, podcasts, and beyond

Social media: Your new 24/7 focus panel

Powerful new ways to capture emerging customer desires and needs

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780132703970
  • Publisher: Pearson Education
  • Publication date: 4/9/2008
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 304
  • File size: 393 KB

Meet the Author

Deirdre Breakenridge is an author, entrepreneur and CEO of Pure Performance Communications. A 20 + year veteran in PR and marketing, she is the author of five FT Press books including her latest titles, Social Media and Public Relations: Eight New Practices for the PR Professional , Putting the Public Back in Public Relations , and PR 2.0: New Media, New Tools, New Audiences .

Deirdre speaks both nationally and internationally on the topics of PR, social media and marketing. She is a recognized PR blogger at PR 2.0 strategies, and also the co-founder of #PRStudChat, a dynamic twitter chat with PR professionals, educators and students.

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Read an Excerpt

IntroductionPraise for PR 2.0

"An 'easy read' filled with practical examples of how marketing professionals can leverage these new tools to enhance PR activities. The 'Interviews with the Experts' sections were especially useful in helping to highlight how companies have benefited from PR2.0."

Maura Mahoney, Senior Director,
RCN Metro Optical Networks

"P.R. 2.0 is a must-read for any marketing or PR professional. It is filled with expert advice, real-world examples, and practical guidance to help us better understand the new media tools and social networking concepts available and how we can use them for our specific branding needs. This book is excellent for someone who is trying to understand the new web-based media and social networking concepts, as well those who are experienced in applying the new media tools and are curious about what everyone else is doing and what tools are producing the best ROI. This isn't a book filled with simple tips and tricks—it's an essential guidebook for the marketing/PR professional to better understand the new media options and how to apply them effectively to achieve results."

Jenny Fisher, Director Sales and Marketing Operations, Catalent Pharma Solutions

"Wading through the thicket of expanding Internet tools—from MySpace to Facebook, from Twitter to Flickr—is no easy challenge. And once you finally understand these strange new art forms, how the heck do you harness them? Answer: You buy this book. Deirdre Breakenridge knows the Net—how to measure it, monitor it, and use it to maximize public relations performance. Best of all, she explains it in a style that even a Luddite can comprehend."

Fraser P. Seitel, author of The Practice of Public Relations and coauthor of IdeaWise

Foreword: The Road from PR to PR 2.0 to Public Relations

Welcome to what just may be the greatest evolution in the history of PR.

Modern Public Relations was born in the early 1900s, even though history traces the practice back to the 17th century. The term public relations was said to be first documented by U.S. President Thomas Jefferson during his address to Congress in 1807.

It wasn't until World War I that we started to see the industry crystallize and spark the evolution of PR as an official profession.

Ivy Lee and Edward Bernays are credited with creating and defining the art and science of modern-day PR in the early 1900s. That's almost 100 years ago; and yet, in what I believe to be PR's greatest renaissance, many of their early philosophies and contributions can be sourced to further evolve PR today.

Ivy Lee developed the first working press release; you can love him or hate him for it. But, what we can't overlook is that he believed PR was a "two-way street" where communications professionals were responsible for helping companies listen as well as communicate their messages to the people who were important to them.

Edward Bernays, who is often referred to as the father of PR, was most certainly its first theorist. A very interesting bit of history is that Bernays is a nephew of Sigmund Freud. Freud's theories about the irrational, unconscious motives that shape human behavior are the inspiration for how Bernays approached public relations.

What's absolutely astounding to me is that he viewed public relations as an applied social science influenced by psychology, sociology, and other disciplines to scientifically manage and manipulate the thinking and behavior of an irrational and "herdlike" public.

According to Bernays, "Public Relations is a management function which tabulates public attitudes, defines the policies, procedures and interest of an organization followed by executing a program of action to earn public understanding and acceptance."

Why is this astounding to me?

Basically, Bernays is the inspiration for the PR 1.0 publicity and spin machine and the architect of how a majority of companies still approach PR today—even though this is all changing right before our eyes. Many of his thoughts, which fueled his books, Crystallizing Public Opinion, Propaganda, and The Engineering of Consent, were on the cusp of predicting what PR currently is facing in the dawn of Social Media. And, Social Media is reintroducing sociology, anthropology, psychology, and other sciences back into marketing.

If we combined the theories and philosophies of Bernays and Lee with the spirit of the new "social web" aka Social Media, we might have a new outlook on this social science that resembles the new driving principles behind PR 2.0.

But what happened to PR?

It no longer triumphs as a darling among the various marketing disciplines, and in many cases, is regarded as a necessary evil these days.

Somewhere along the way, we, as an industry, lost our vision. We got caught up in hype, spin, hyperbole, and buzzwords, and forgot that PR was about Public Relations.

Unfortunately, these days PR is more aligned with theatrics than value. Enter Social Media and the democratization of the Web.

These are indeed exciting times as Social Media is truly the catalyst for reflection and an opportunity to do PR and amplify value and increase effectiveness in the process.

What is Social Media?

Social Media is anything that uses the Internet to facilitate conversations between people. I say people, because it humanizes the process of communications when you think about conversations instead of companies marketing at audiences.

Social Media refers back to the "two-way" approach of PR that Ivy Lee discussed in his day. It's about listening and, in turn, engaging people on their level. It forces PR to stop broadcasting and start connecting. Monologue has given way to dialog.

Now, enter PR 2.0.

Just so you understand, it's not a trendy term meant to capitalize on the current trend of "everything 2.0." Honestly, it's already ten years in the making, but Social Media is truly advancing the adoption of a new, more significant role for PR.

Here's how I defined it in the 90s (it's dated, but it is still relevant today):

PR 2.0 was born through the analysis of how the Web and multimedia was redefining PR and marketing communications, while also building the toolkit to reinvent how companies communicate with influencers and directly with people.

It is a chance to not only work with traditional journalists, but also engage directly with a new set of accidental influencers, and, it is also our ability to talk with customers directly (through online forums, groups, communities, BBS, etc.)

No BS. No hype. It's an understanding of markets, the needs of people, and how to reach them at the street level—without insulting everyone along the way. PR will become a hybrid of communications, evangelism, and Web marketing.

PR 2.0 was actually inspired by Web 1.0 and the new channel for the distribution of information it represented. It changed everything. It forced traditional media to evolve. It created an entirely new set of influencers with a completely different mechanism for collecting and sharing information while also reforming the daily routines of how people searched for news.

PR 2.0 is a philosophy and practice to improve the quality of work, change the game, and participate with people in a more informed and intelligent way. It's not about the new Web tools at all. They are merely tools used to facilitate conversations...but everything, especially intent, knowledge, and enthusiasm, are unique to YOU.

You are the key to new PR.

To be direct, the truth is that PR 2.0 is really what PR should have been all along. Now with the democratization of media, people are becoming the new influencers, complementing the existence of experts and traditional journalists, but still regarded as a source and resource for customers equally.

Understanding new PR to reinvent it is the goal of this book. Deirdre Breakenridge has poured her life's experiences and passion into these pages to inspire and empower you with the ability to change, and ultimately, participate in new media. In doing so, you will learn today's communication methods that will help you engage in meaningful conversations and build stronger trusting relationships—both personally and professionally—with customers, influencers, experts, and traditional media alike.

PR 2.0 is about putting the "public" back in Public Relations.

Brian Solis Principal of FutureWorks PR, Blogger at PR 2.0
http://www.briansolis.com

© Copyright Pearson Education. All rights reserved.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments xiii

About the Author xv

Foreword by Brian Solis xvii

Introduction to PR 2.0 1

Section I The Transition to PR 2.0

Chapter 1 PR 2.0 Is Here 13

Chapter 2 Getting Started with 2.0 Research 27

Chapter 3 Research with Expert Resources 41

Chapter 4 Reaching the Wired Media for Better Coverage 57

Chapter 5 Better Monitoring for PR 2.0 71

Section II A New Direction in PR

Chapter 6 Interactive Newsrooms: How to Attract the Media 87

Chapter 7 The Social Media News Release: An Overdue Facelift 103

Chapter 8 Social Networking: A Revolution Has Begun 123

Chapter 9 RSS Technology: A Really Simple Tool to Broaden Your Reach 143

Chapter 10 Video and Audio for Enhanced Web Communications 161

Section III Embracing PR 2.0

Chapter 11 Social Media: Immerse Yourself and Your Brand 187

Chapter 12 The Pro’s Use of PR 2.0 207

Chapter 13 The Mindset of the PR 2.0 Journalist 227

Chapter 14 A PR 2.0 Plan 243

Section IV The Future of PR 2.0

Chapter 15 The Path to Great PR 261

Index 275

Read More Show Less

Preface

Praise for PR 2.0

"An 'easy read' filled with practical examples of how marketing professionals can leverage these new tools to enhance PR activities. The 'Interviews with the Experts' sections were especially useful in helping to highlight how companies have benefited from PR2.0."

Maura Mahoney, Senior Director,
RCN Metro Optical Networks

"P.R. 2.0 is a must-read for any marketing or PR professional. It is filled with expert advice, real-world examples, and practical guidance to help us better understand the new media tools and social networking concepts available and how we can use them for our specific branding needs. This book is excellent for someone who is trying to understand the new web-based media and social networking concepts, as well those who are experienced in applying the new media tools and are curious about what everyone else is doing and what tools are producing the best ROI. This isn't a book filled with simple tips and tricks—it's an essential guidebook for the marketing/PR professional to better understand the new media options and how to apply them effectively to achieve results."

Jenny Fisher, Director Sales and Marketing Operations, Catalent Pharma Solutions

"Wading through the thicket of expanding Internet tools—from MySpace to Facebook, from Twitter to Flickr—is no easy challenge. And once you finally understand these strange new art forms, how the heck do you harness them? Answer: You buy this book. Deirdre Breakenridge knows the Net—how to measure it, monitor it, and use it to maximize public relations performance. Best of all, she explains it in a style that even a Luddite can comprehend."

Fraser P. Seitel, author of The Practice of Public Relations and coauthor of IdeaWise

Foreword: The Road from PR to PR 2.0 to Public Relations

Welcome to what just may be the greatest evolution in the history of PR.

Modern Public Relations was born in the early 1900s, even though history traces the practice back to the 17th century. The term public relations was said to be first documented by U.S. President Thomas Jefferson during his address to Congress in 1807.

It wasn't until World War I that we started to see the industry crystallize and spark the evolution of PR as an official profession.

Ivy Lee and Edward Bernays are credited with creating and defining the art and science of modern-day PR in the early 1900s. That's almost 100 years ago; and yet, in what I believe to be PR's greatest renaissance, many of their early philosophies and contributions can be sourced to further evolve PR today.

Ivy Lee developed the first working press release; you can love him or hate him for it. But, what we can't overlook is that he believed PR was a "two-way street" where communications professionals were responsible for helping companies listen as well as communicate their messages to the people who were important to them.

Edward Bernays, who is often referred to as the father of PR, was most certainly its first theorist. A very interesting bit of history is that Bernays is a nephew of Sigmund Freud. Freud's theories about the irrational, unconscious motives that shape human behavior are the inspiration for how Bernays approached public relations.

What's absolutely astounding to me is that he viewed public relations as an applied social science influenced by psychology, sociology, and other disciplines to scientifically manage and manipulate the thinking and behavior of an irrational and "herdlike" public.

According to Bernays, "Public Relations is a management function which tabulates public attitudes, defines the policies, procedures and interest of an organization followed by executing a program of action to earn public understanding and acceptance."

Why is this astounding to me?

Basically, Bernays is the inspiration for the PR 1.0 publicity and spin machine and the architect of how a majority of companies still approach PR today—even though this is all changing right before our eyes. Many of his thoughts, which fueled his books, Crystallizing Public Opinion, Propaganda, and The Engineering of Consent, were on the cusp of predicting what PR currently is facing in the dawn of Social Media. And, Social Media is reintroducing sociology, anthropology, psychology, and other sciences back into marketing.

If we combined the theories and philosophies of Bernays and Lee with the spirit of the new "social web" aka Social Media, we might have a new outlook on this social science that resembles the new driving principles behind PR 2.0.

But what happened to PR?

It no longer triumphs as a darling among the various marketing disciplines, and in many cases, is regarded as a necessary evil these days.

Somewhere along the way, we, as an industry, lost our vision. We got caught up in hype, spin, hyperbole, and buzzwords, and forgot that PR was about Public Relations.

Unfortunately, these days PR is more aligned with theatrics than value. Enter Social Media and the democratization of the Web.

These are indeed exciting times as Social Media is truly the catalyst for reflection and an opportunity to do PR and amplify value and increase effectiveness in the process.

What is Social Media?

Social Media is anything that uses the Internet to facilitate conversations between people. I say people, because it humanizes the process of communications when you think about conversations instead of companies marketing at audiences.

Social Media refers back to the "two-way" approach of PR that Ivy Lee discussed in his day. It's about listening and, in turn, engaging people on their level. It forces PR to stop broadcasting and start connecting. Monologue has given way to dialog.

Now, enter PR 2.0.

Just so you understand, it's not a trendy term meant to capitalize on the current trend of "everything 2.0." Honestly, it's already ten years in the making, but Social Media is truly advancing the adoption of a new, more significant role for PR.

Here's how I defined it in the 90s (it's dated, but it is still relevant today):

PR 2.0 was born through the analysis of how the Web and multimedia was redefining PR and marketing communications, while also building the toolkit to reinvent how companies communicate with influencers and directly with people.

It is a chance to not only work with traditional journalists, but also engage directly with a new set of accidental influencers, and, it is also our ability to talk with customers directly (through online forums, groups, communities, BBS, etc.)

No BS. No hype. It's an understanding of markets, the needs of people, and how to reach them at the street level—without insulting everyone along the way. PR will become a hybrid of communications, evangelism, and Web marketing.

PR 2.0 was actually inspired by Web 1.0 and the new channel for the distribution of information it represented. It changed everything. It forced traditional media to evolve. It created an entirely new set of influencers with a completely different mechanism for collecting and sharing information while also reforming the daily routines of how people searched for news.

PR 2.0 is a philosophy and practice to improve the quality of work, change the game, and participate with people in a more informed and intelligent way. It's not about the new Web tools at all. They are merely tools used to facilitate conversations...but everything, especially intent, knowledge, and enthusiasm, are unique to YOU.

You are the key to new PR.

To be direct, the truth is that PR 2.0 is really what PR should have been all along. Now with the democratization of media, people are becoming the new influencers, complementing the existence of experts and traditional journalists, but still regarded as a source and resource for customers equally.

Understanding new PR to reinvent it is the goal of this book. Deirdre Breakenridge has poured her life's experiences and passion into these pages to inspire and empower you with the ability to change, and ultimately, participate in new media. In doing so, you will learn today's communication methods that will help you engage in meaningful conversations and build stronger trusting relationships—both personally and professionally—with customers, influencers, experts, and traditional media alike.

PR 2.0 is about putting the "public" back in Public Relations.

Brian Solis Principal of FutureWorks PR, Blogger at PR 2.0
http://www.briansolis.com

© Copyright Pearson Education. All rights reserved.

Read More Show Less

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