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PR Crisis Bible: How to Take Charge of the Media When All Hell Breaks Loose
     

PR Crisis Bible: How to Take Charge of the Media When All Hell Breaks Loose

by Robin Cohn
 

You're the CEO of XYZ Worldwide. CNN has reported today, based on an unsubstantiated Matt Drudge report, that a female board member is engaged with you in insider trading of XYZ stock. And that she's rumored to be your lover. Camera crews and reporters are gathering in the lobby.

What do you do?

Ten years ago-even five-all an executive had to do was slip out

Overview

You're the CEO of XYZ Worldwide. CNN has reported today, based on an unsubstantiated Matt Drudge report, that a female board member is engaged with you in insider trading of XYZ stock. And that she's rumored to be your lover. Camera crews and reporters are gathering in the lobby.

What do you do?

Ten years ago-even five-all an executive had to do was slip out the back door. But to survive in today's business world, where executives' personal lives (like recent Presidents') are no longer out of bounds, CEOs have to take responsibility for such stories, and have to respond immediately to the media with a credible explanation. Most executives simply don't realize that this is what they must do. Their careers are at stake.

The PR Crisis Bible is the only book to protect a CEO's reputation by stopping the problem where it begins: in the mind of the CEO. It's the first book that shows CEOs how the new media rules have changed the world. It demonstrates the right ways to respond to today's instant scandals, unsubstantiated reports, Internet rumors, and other crises. It pinpoints the reasons why CEOs get themselves into trouble, and shows how to turn a disaster to advantage. Today, CEOs must avoid the "seven deadly sins of handling a crisis" because even if they had nothing to do with a problem, it ends up in their lap. The buck always stops at the top.

Robin Cohn strikes a masterful balance between fear, the most powerful of motivators, and humor. Her cautionary tales of executives on the receiving end of adverse media will strike a chord with all decision-makers and leaders. The author's message? You can be prepared. But you must know the drill before a cyber-disaster strikes.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Managing potentially damaging business news has become trickier in today's fast-paced television and Internet news environment. Cohn, who runs her own public relations firm specializing in crisis management, offers solid advice on avoiding the PR sins that can sink a company. Among the most common mistakes--often made by experienced executives--are believing that disaster will never strike, shifting blame and responding "no comment" when confronted with a difficult question. Drawing on familiar news events to prove her points, Cohn shows how, for example, personal problems can become company problems. When chief executive Gary Wendt battled his wife in a bitter divorce, his employer, GE Capital, was scrutinized in the media. William Agee's career at Bendix was hurt when his affair with associate Mary Cunningham was made public. In another telling example, she recounts how a well-known business reporter once stopped an executive in the hall to ask for directions to an office and, when the man quickly hurried away muttering that he had no comment, was spurred to dig for a story. While Cohn presents some useful pointers on sidestepping the "seven deadly sins" of PR crisis management, her book would have been stronger if she had expanded and systematized her recommendations instead of offering only brief nuggets of advice. (Oct.) Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.|

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780312252304
Publisher:
St. Martin's Press
Publication date:
11/11/2000
Edition description:
First Edition
Pages:
304
Product dimensions:
7.04(w) x 8.60(h) x 1.16(d)

Meet the Author

Robin Cohn is a nationally recognized expert in corporate public relations who set the standard for handling crises when she directed the response of Air Florida after the fatal crash of its Flight #90 in the Potomac River in 1982. In addition to being a compelling writer, she is a dynamic speaker and media promoter. She lives and works in New York City.

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