PR on a Budget: Free, Cheap, and Worth the Money Strategies for Getting Noticed

PR on a Budget: Free, Cheap, and Worth the Money Strategies for Getting Noticed

5.0 3
by Leonard Saffir
     
 

For those who think their “widget” is the coolest around and are going it alone with PR, getting publicity is often a confusing, hit-or-miss process. Incorporating public relations in business plans can be the difference between success and failure. But recognizing the power of PR is one thing; harnessing it is another. PR on a Budget proves that

Overview

For those who think their “widget” is the coolest around and are going it alone with PR, getting publicity is often a confusing, hit-or-miss process. Incorporating public relations in business plans can be the difference between success and failure. But recognizing the power of PR is one thing; harnessing it is another. PR on a Budget proves that it is possible to handle a business or organization’s public relations in a manageable, logical, and cost-effective fashion

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781419523670
Publisher:
Kaplan Publishing
Publication date:
11/01/2006
Pages:
256
Product dimensions:
8.78(w) x 7.22(h) x 0.52(d)

Meet the Author

Leonard Saffir served as executive vice president of Porter Novelli, one of the largest public relations firms in the world. His impressive client list includes: Philip Morris USA, MasterCard, Pepsi Cola, Bristol-Myers, Mattel, Gilette, and many others. He is the recipient of the Public Relations Society of America’s prestigious Silver Anvil and Big Apple awards, and several PRSA Certificates of Commendation. He has also won numerous journalism awards and is a past president of the Overseas Press Club of America.

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PR on a Budget: Free, Cheap, and Worth the Money Strategies for Getting Noticed 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
CSENYC More than 1 year ago
This has a lot of practical information (such as names of helpful websites and newsletters, and even email addresses) to use. Thank goodness, little "fluff" about the author, which makes me respect him more compared to other authors who just ramble on about their own lives.
Guest More than 1 year ago
PR on a Budget exceeded all my expectations. It is thorough, well organized, truly helpful, and interesting to read. Mr. Saffir reports and writes from both views of PR, as a journalist receiving materials, and as a pr specialist generating coverage in all media. I am giving copies to friends, and am keeping a copy handy for my reference.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The use of public relations in business has become commonplace to allow entrepreneurs to put across their message. There is no mystery in the process, but merely common sense operation. The use of this phenomenon is clearly and plainly explained in Leonard Saffir¿s new book, PR on a Budget, Free, Cheap and Worth the Money Strategies for Getting Noticed ($18.95 paperback, Kaplan Publishing). That¿s a rather long title which simply says, the use of public relations--good public relations--is not so involved most businesses and governments can put it to good use. The examples Saffir uses to put across his point are fascinating to say the least. Saffir tells of the long task in getting Ferdinand Marcos elected president of the Philippines, a feat he would as soon forget. His work for Philip Morris USA, Pepsi Cola and others are a guide to good public relations and how positive positioning can effect a product. Saffir uses Lake Worth as an example of how NOT to handle crisis situations and how the city gets itself into hot water and stays there. 'Politicians always amaze me when they try to cover up their own mistakes with something or other on their opponent or the media,' Saffir says. 'It doesn¿t take a great deal of sense to know that if you have to explain it over and over, it is probably wrong and there is no reason to blast the other guy.' Too bad, the sense that is common to most is obscure to many.