Practical Electronics for Inventors

Overview

Practical Electronics for Inventors, on the other hand, gives you information you need, in a format you can work with. Packed with hand-drawn illustrations, this crystal-clear, learn-as-you-go guide shows you what a particular device does, what it looks like, how it compares with similar devices, and how it is used in applications. Written by Paul Scherz, an inventor and electrical hobbyist, this important reference provides beginning hobbyists and inventors with an intuitive grasp of the theoretical and ...
See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (14) from $1.99   
  • New (3) from $34.95   
  • Used (11) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$34.95
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(102)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
2000 Trade paperback New in new dust jacket. brand new book. textbook. Trade paperback (US). Glued binding. 528 p. Contains: Illustrations. Audience: General/trade.

Ships from: St Petersburg, FL

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$65.00
Seller since 2015

Feedback rating:

(215)

Condition: New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
$65.00
Seller since 2015

Feedback rating:

(215)

Condition: New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview

Practical Electronics for Inventors, on the other hand, gives you information you need, in a format you can work with. Packed with hand-drawn illustrations, this crystal-clear, learn-as-you-go guide shows you what a particular device does, what it looks like, how it compares with similar devices, and how it is used in applications. Written by Paul Scherz, an inventor and electrical hobbyist, this important reference provides beginning hobbyists and inventors with an intuitive grasp of the theoretical and practical aspects of electronics - just the kind of insight you need to got your projects up and running." "Along with coverage of integrated circuits (ICs), digital electronics, and various input/output devices, Practical Electronics for inventors takes you through reading schematics; building and testing prototypes; purchasing electronic components; and safe work practices. You'll find all this - and more - in the guide that's destined to spur you on to new levels of creativity.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Booknews
Covering the same basic information as other introductory electronics books, only presenting the information on particular devices and circuits do before discussing the physics of how they work, this text covers basic circuit components, semiconductors, optoelectronics, integrated circuits, operational amplifiers, filters, oscillators and timers, voltage regulators, audio electronics, digital electronics, DC motors, RC servos, and other devices. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780070580787
  • Publisher: McGraw-Hill Companies, The
  • Publication date: 3/1/2000
  • Edition description: Older Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 528
  • Product dimensions: 8.52 (w) x 11.10 (h) x 0.89 (d)

Meet the Author

Paul Scherz is a physicist/mechanical engineer who received his B.S. in physics from the University of Wisconsin. He is an inventor/hobbyist in electronics, an area he grew to appreciate through his experience at the University's Department of Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics and the Department of Plasma Physics.

Dr. Simon Monk has a degree in Cybernetics and Computer Science and a PhD in Software Engineering. Monk spent several years as an academic before he returned to industry, co-founding the mobile software company Momote Ltd. He has been an active electronics hobbyist since his early teens and is a full time writer on hobby electronics and open source hardware. Dr. Monk is the author of numerous electronics books, including 30 Arduino Projects for the Evil Genius and Arduino + Android Projects for the Evil Genius.

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

Chapter 1: Introduction to Electronics

Perhaps the most common predicament a newcomer faces when learning electronics is figuring out exactly what it is he or she must learn. What topics are worth covering, and in which general order should they be covered? A good starting point to get a sense of what is important to learn and in what general order is presented in the flowchart in Fig. 1.1. This chart provides an overview of the basic elements that go into designing practical electrical gadgets and represents the information you will find in this book. The following paragraphs describe these basic elements in detail.

At the top of the chart comes the theory. This involves learning about voltage, current, resistance, capacitance, inductance, and various laws and theorems that help predict the size and direction of voltages and currents within circuits. As you learn the basic theory, you will be introduced to basic passive components such as resistors, capacitors, inductors, and transformers.

Next down the line comes discrete passive circuits. Discrete passive circuits include current-limiting networks, voltage dividers, filter circuits, attenuators, and so on. These simple circuits, by themselves, are not very interesting, but they are vital ingredients in more complex circuits.

After you have learned about passive components and circuits, you move on to discrete active devices, which are built from semiconductor materials. These devices consist mainly of diodes (one-way current-flow gates), transistors (electrically controlled switches /amplifiers), and thyristors (electrically controlled switches only).

Once you have covered the discrete active devices, you move onto discrete active/passive circuits. Some of these circuits include rectifiers (ac-to-do converters), amplifiers, oscillators, modulators, mixers, and voltage regulators. This is where things start getting interesting.

To make things easier on the circuit designer, manufacturers have created integrated circuits (ICs) that contain discrete circuits-like the ones mentioned in the last paragraph-that are crammed onto a tiny chip of silicon. The chip usually is housed within a plastic package, where tiny internal wires link the chip to external metal terminals. Integrated circuits such as amplifiers and voltage regulators are referred to as analog devices, which means that they respond to and produce signals of varying degrees of voltage. (This is unlike digital ICs, which work with only two voltage levels.) Becoming familiar with integrated circuits is a necessity for any practical circuit designer.

Digital electronics comes next. Digital circuits work with only two voltage states, high (e.g., 5 V) or low (e.g., 0 V). The reason for having only two voltage states has to do with the ease of data (numbers, symbols, control information) processing and storage. The process of encoding information into signals that digital circuits can use involves combining bits (1 's and 0's, equivalent to high and low voltages) into discrete-meaning "words." The designer dictates what these words will mean to a specific circuit. Unlike analog electronics, digital electronics uses a whole new set of components, which at the heart are all integrated in form. A huge number of specialized ICs are used in digital electronics. Some of these ICs are designed to perform logical operations on input information, others are designed to count, while still others are designed to store information that can be retrieved later on. Digital ICs include logic gates, flip-flops, shift registers, counters, memories, processors, and the like. Digital circuits are what give electrical gadgets "brains." In order for digital circuits to interact with analog circuits, special analog-to-digital (A/D) conversion circuits are needed to convert analog signals into special strings of 1's and 0's. Likewise, digitalto-analog conversion circuits are used to convert strings of 1's and 0's into analog signals.

Throughout your study of electronics, you will learn about various input-output (I/O) devices (transducers). Input devices convert physical signals, such as sound, light, and pressure, into electrical signals that circuits can use. These devices include microphones, phototransistors, switches, keyboards, thermistors, strain gauges, generators, and antennas. Output devices convert electrical signals into physical signals. Output devices include lamps, LED and LCD displays, speakers, buzzers, motors (dc, servo, stepper), solenoids, and antennas. It is these I/O devices that allow humans and circuits to communicate with one another. And finally comes the construction/ testing phase. This involves learning to read schematic diagrams, constructing circuit prototypes using breadboards, testing prototypes (using multimeters, oscilloscopes, and logic probes), revising prototypes (if needed), and constructing final circuits using various tools and special circuit boards...

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Preface
Ch. 1 Introduction to Electronics 1
Ch. 2 Theory 5
Ch. 3 Basic Electronic Circuit Components 59
Ch. 4 Semiconductors 123
Ch. 5 Optoelectronics 191
Ch. 6 Integrated Circuits 213
Ch. 7 Operational Amplifiers 219
Ch. 8 Filters 247
Ch. 9 Oscillators and Timers 267
Ch. 10 Voltage Regulators and Power Supplies 283
Ch. 11 Audio Electronics 299
Ch. 12 Digital Electronics 313
Ch. 13 DC Motors, RC Servos, and Stepper Motors 409
Ch. 14 Hands-on Electronics 423
App. A: Power Distribution and Home Wiring 459
App. B: Electronic Symbols 465
App. C: Useful Facts and Formulas 467
App. D: Finding Components 471
App. E: A Note on Injection Molding and Patents 473
App. F: History of Electronics Timeline 477
App. G: Component Data, List of Logic ICs, Foreign Semiconductor Codes 483
App. H Analog/Digital Interfacing 497
App. I: Displays 515
App. J: Memory Devices 535
App. K: Microprocessors and Microcontrollers 553
Index 585
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 13, 2002

    Too Many Mistakes, Terrible Teacher

    I recommend this book to everybody who wants to lose their sanity. In the first two chapters alone, I found at least five misprints that will cause you to waste hours recalculating. Not only that, the book is terrible at explaining things in a manner that would let you pass any sort of electronics exam, i.e. you have to read the author's mind in order to really understand electronics theories.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 2, 2002

    Good basic book on electronics

    This is a good book--regardless of the 1-star review I saw listed. I found the explanations very insightful, and the teaching very good. It should be noted that the first chapter is a bit technical in the math, but you actually don't have to understand that chapter to use the rest of the book. The mistakes are there, but I haven't found any that are show stoppers. I give this book 5 stars for content, but subtract one star for typos--not 4 stars! This is one of the most complete and understandable books on electronics I've come across.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 8, 2001

    Excellent Buy

    This book is a wonderful buy for anyone wishing to learn Electronics theory and application. It contains everything to learn about all the needed parts for creating radios, lasers, computer parts and more! The only problem I had with this text is that it had a few computational errors (which were not difficult to locate). Anyone with an 11th grade or above education will be able to understand what they read, and apply it to everyday electronics.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 11, 2001

    A sweat find

    I wish I had this as a text book in college, it could have easily replaced all the c-r-a-p-p-y text books that I had to deal with... namely anything authored by Fortney! - I now use all my EE books as only reference material since I found this one. It is short and sweat and melds just the right amount of theory, real world examples and metaphoric examples.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 21, 2000

    Extensive collection of topics

    This book is an excellent text for practically anyone studying or practicing electronics. The manner in which the author explains concepts is crystal clear, comprehensive, and practical minded. The selection of topics covered is also impressive. This is one of best introductory text on electronics around. The only problem I had with this text where some mislabeled symbols on a few pages, and a few typos. Other than that, an excellent book.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)