Practical Guide for Clinical Neurophysiologic Testing (EEG)

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Overview


Written by a noted leader in electroneurodiagnostic technology, this book will be a standard text and reference for technologists, neurology residents, and clinical neurophysiology fellows. The first part covers the technical aspects of electroneurodiagnosis, including basic electronics and recording techniques; the second part covers the clinical applications and diagnostic utilities of electroneurodiagnosis for various central nervous system disorders. The text focuses on digital recording and includes analyses based on digital data. Emphasis is on pattern recognition, artifacts recognition, technical pitfalls, and the clinical correlates of electroencephalography. The book includes material to assist students in recognizing specific artifacts. Coverage includes principles of digital recording, electronics and electrical safety. This book will be a valuable aid in preparing for the ABRET (American Board of Registration of Electroencephalographic and Evoked Potential Technologists) certification or the neurophysiology boards. A companion Website will include a question bank and a streaming video showing how to place electrodes.
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Editorial Reviews

Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Matthew Hoerth, MD (Mayo Clinic Arizona)
Description: This is a resource for clinicians and technologists in training to learn the concepts of basic electroencephalographic technology and interpretation of the electroencephalogram (EEG).
Purpose: The purpose is to provide a comprehensive and up-to-date beginners' guide to recording and interpreting EEGs. The authors set out to provide a current book as EEG technology has now shifted to digital format and other books have become outdated. The emphasis is on figures and diagrams, as it should be since EEG is fundamentally based on visual analysis. The basic concepts of EEG are usually quite unfamiliar to beginners to the field. The emphasis on figures, diagrams, and EEG examples is evident throughout each chapter.
Audience: The audience encompasses two groups, neurologists in training (neurology residents or clinical neurophysiology fellows) and electroneurodiagnostic (END) technology students. Although the emphasis is on EEG, a chapter on basic electronics and electrical safety can be applied to other areas of electroneurodiagnostics. A chapter that focuses on basic neuroanatomy that applies to neurophysiologic studies is likely intended more for END technologists than neurology residents. Edited by a clinical neurophysiologist and a registered EEG technologist, this book is appropriate for the intended audience.
Features: Technical chapters cover basic EEG technology, basic electronics, electrical safety, and the digital EEG, while interpretation chapters cover visual interpretation of EEG, normal EEG, and diffuse and focal EEG abnormalities. A separate chapter covers infant EEG. The chapters on interpretation are full of EEG examples. The EEG figures are typically one-half page in size, which are large enough to see details and small enough to avoid adding too much to the bulk of the book. All figures are in black and white, although this is appropriate for this edition. Color figures may be needed in future editions, as EEG technology advances and there is increased use of post-hoc digital analysis of EEG information. The book includes online access to the text as well.
Assessment: This book accomplishes its goal of introducing beginners to EEG. Its relatively short length and the numerous figures may make this appealing for resident neurologists and END students. Although much of what must be learned about EEG needs to come from experience, this book does provide an appropriate table of contents to use it as a reference to answer simple questions. There are several large reference textbooks and atlases of EEG, but this book provides an adequate alternative to an all-inclusive reference for beginners. There are relatively few books of this kind written specifically for EEG trainees.
From The Critics
Reviewer:Matthew Hoerth, MD(Mayo Clinic Hospital)
Description:This is a resource for clinicians and technologists in training to learn the concepts of basic electroencephalographic technology and interpretation of the electroencephalogram (EEG).
Purpose:The purpose is to provide a comprehensive and up-to-date beginners' guide to recording and interpreting EEGs. The authors set out to provide a current book as EEG technology has now shifted to digital format and other books have become outdated. The emphasis is on figures and diagrams, as it should be since EEG is fundamentally based on visual analysis. The basic concepts of EEG are usually quite unfamiliar to beginners to the field. The emphasis on figures, diagrams, and EEG examples is evident throughout each chapter.
Audience:The audience encompasses two groups, neurologists in training (neurology residents or clinical neurophysiology fellows) and electroneurodiagnostic (END) technology students. Although the emphasis is on EEG, a chapter on basic electronics and electrical safety can be applied to other areas of electroneurodiagnostics. A chapter that focuses on basic neuroanatomy that applies to neurophysiologic studies is likely intended more for END technologists than neurology residents. Edited by a clinical neurophysiologist and a registered EEG technologist, this book is appropriate for the intended audience.
Features:Technical chapters cover basic EEG technology, basic electronics, electrical safety, and the digital EEG, while interpretation chapters cover visual interpretation of EEG, normal EEG, and diffuse and focal EEG abnormalities. A separate chapter covers infant EEG. The chapters on interpretation are full of EEG examples. The EEG figures are typically one-half page in size, which are large enough to see details and small enough to avoid adding too much to the bulk of the book. All figures are in black and white, although this is appropriate for this edition. Color figures may be needed in future editions, as EEG technology advances and there is increased use of post-hoc digital analysis of EEG information. The book includes online access to the text as well.
Assessment:This book accomplishes its goal of introducing beginners to EEG. Its relatively short length and the numerous figures may make this appealing for resident neurologists and END students. Although much of what must be learned about EEG needs to come from experience, this book does provide an appropriate table of contents to use it as a reference to answer simple questions. There are several large reference textbooks and atlases of EEG, but this book provides an adequate alternative to an all-inclusive reference for beginners. There are relatively few books of this kind written specifically for EEG trainees.
From The Critics
Reviewer: Matthew Hoerth, MD(Mayo Clinic Hospital)
Description: This is a resource for clinicians and technologists in training to learn the concepts of basic electroencephalographic technology and interpretation of the electroencephalogram (EEG).
Purpose: The purpose is to provide a comprehensive and up-to-date beginners' guide to recording and interpreting EEGs. The authors set out to provide a current book as EEG technology has now shifted to digital format and other books have become outdated. The emphasis is on figures and diagrams, as it should be since EEG is fundamentally based on visual analysis. The basic concepts of EEG are usually quite unfamiliar to beginners to the field. The emphasis on figures, diagrams, and EEG examples is evident throughout each chapter.
Audience: The audience encompasses two groups, neurologists in training (neurology residents or clinical neurophysiology fellows) and electroneurodiagnostic (END) technology students. Although the emphasis is on EEG, a chapter on basic electronics and electrical safety can be applied to other areas of electroneurodiagnostics. A chapter that focuses on basic neuroanatomy that applies to neurophysiologic studies is likely intended more for END technologists than neurology residents. Edited by a clinical neurophysiologist and a registered EEG technologist, this book is appropriate for the intended audience.
Features: Technical chapters cover basic EEG technology, basic electronics, electrical safety, and the digital EEG, while interpretation chapters cover visual interpretation of EEG, normal EEG, and diffuse and focal EEG abnormalities. A separate chapter covers infant EEG. The chapters on interpretation are full of EEG examples. The EEG figures are typically one-half page in size, which are large enough to see details and small enough to avoid adding too much to the bulk of the book. All figures are in black and white, although this is appropriate for this edition. Color figures may be needed in future editions, as EEG technology advances and there is increased use of post-hoc digital analysis of EEG information. The book includes online access to the text as well.
Assessment: This book accomplishes its goal of introducing beginners to EEG. Its relatively short length and the numerous figures may make this appealing for resident neurologists and END students. Although much of what must be learned about EEG needs to come from experience, this book does provide an appropriate table of contents to use it as a reference to answer simple questions. There are several large reference textbooks and atlases of EEG, but this book provides an adequate alternative to an all-inclusive reference for beginners. There are relatively few books of this kind written specifically for EEG trainees.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780781778619
  • Publisher: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
  • Publication date: 11/1/2009
  • Pages: 416
  • Sales rank: 593,611
  • Product dimensions: 8.30 (w) x 10.80 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Table of Contents

Introduction: History and Perspective of Clinical Neurophysiological Diagnostic Tests

Basic EEG Technology

Basic Electronics and Electrical Safety
Peter Seaba

Digital EEG
Malcolm Yeh

Neuroanatomical and Neurophysiologic Basis of EEG

Principles of Visual Analysis of EEG

Characteristics of Normal EEG

The Assessment of Abnormal EEG

Activation Procedures

EEG and Epilepsy

Diffuse EEG Abnormalities

Focal EEG Abnormalities

Benign EEG Patterns

Artifact Recognition and Technical Pitfalls

EEG of Premature and Full-Term Infants

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