BN.com Gift Guide

Practical Internetworking with TCP - IP and Unix

Overview

TCP/IP and UNIX, both born in the research community, have experienced phenomenal growth and commercial success over the past decade. TCP/IP is the network protocol family of choice on the Internet, the largest and fastest growing data communications network in the world today. UNIX systems, with their mature support of TCP/IP, are a central and growing part of many organizations' networking strategy. Through a careful blend of network theory and practice, these two network authorities provide readers with the ...
See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (15) from $1.99   
  • New (4) from $4.95   
  • Used (11) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$4.95
Seller since 2006

Feedback rating:

(119)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
Glossy hardcover. Pristine condition. No wear. No markings. No remainder mark. Shipped with USPS delivery confirmation. Shipped by Airmail to addresses outside the U.S.

Ships from: Holmdel, NJ

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
$32.49
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(310)

Condition: New
Brand New Item.

Ships from: Chatham, NJ

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$36.64
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(4)

Condition: New
Hardcover New 0201586290 Brand New US Edition Book in Perfect Condition. Fast Shipping with tracking number.

Ships from: Houston, TX

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$45.00
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(193)

Condition: New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview

TCP/IP and UNIX, both born in the research community, have experienced phenomenal growth and commercial success over the past decade. TCP/IP is the network protocol family of choice on the Internet, the largest and fastest growing data communications network in the world today. UNIX systems, with their mature support of TCP/IP, are a central and growing part of many organizations' networking strategy. Through a careful blend of network theory and practice, these two network authorities provide readers with the knowledge to understand what TCP/IP is, how it works, and how to use it to build practical and working network systems that are both extensible and maintainable. Practical Internetworking with TCP/IP and UNIX, the third in the new UNIX and Open Systems Series by Addison-Wesley, describes in detail how to set up and manage a TCP/IP network using the tools available within the UNIX operating system. Systems designers, network administrators, and system programmers will find the TCP/IP knowledge they need in this concise volume. Gives a concise foundation in TCP/IP fundamentals, provides extensive coverage of electronic mail configuration in a complex networking environment, explains how to set up and manage an operational TCP/IP network, describes the integration of Apple Macintoshes and IBM PCs, and illustrates network management techniques and how to diagnose and solve common network problems.

Two of the industry's top consultants provide a practical approach to implementing and managing an effective TCP/IP network that is compatible with other networks. System designers, network administrators, and system programmers alike, will appreciate the extensive coverage offered here of such design and management issues as how to configure electronic mail in a complex networking environment.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Booknews
The authors explain what TCP/IP is, how it works, and how to use it to build practical and working network systems that are both extensible and maintainable. Chapters cover Internet, TCP/IP services, transport protocol basics, naming hosts and other objects, setting up basic network services, electronic mail, Sendmail architecture and configuration, Macintosh and PC integration, network management and debugging, and access. Written for systems designers, network administrators, and system programmers. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780201586299
  • Publisher: Addison Wesley Professional
  • Publication date: 8/31/1993
  • Series: UNIX and Open Systems Series
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 496
  • Product dimensions: 6.59 (w) x 9.50 (h) x 0.97 (d)

Read an Excerpt

PREFACE:
This book is a practical guide for building TCP/IP networks with the UNIX operating system, and for using both TCP/IP and UNIX to integrate other network protocols and operating systems into a distributed computing environment. The book is not a protocol theory book, not a programming text, and not a user tutorial. It is about how to make whole networks actually work in practice.

The TCP/IP protocols are used in tens of thousands of networks to connect millions of machines throughout the world. The largest of the collection of networks that use TCP/IP is the Internet. The Internet is the world's largest computer network and has been doubling in size each year since 1988. It had perhaps ten million users by 1993: researchers and academics, corporate employees, librarians and politicians, schoolteachers, and the general public. This global network commune has no central authority. The Internet works because of general agreement on network protocols used and because of cooperation among the users for the good of the network.

Much of the growth of the Internet is in local area networks (LANs) inside both private and public organizations, as opposed to wide area networks (WANs). Some of these organizations are universities, government agencies, or government contractors, which were the historical research and academic base of TCP/IP. Other LANs are privately owned enterprise networks inside commercial companies. Many enterprise networks are not interconnected directly with the Internet proper, or are deliberately firewalled from it, so that only authorized corporate users may have access.

The LANs, whether interconnected with the Internet or not, aregrowing very rapidly, and more of them appear daily. Many of the organizations behind these networks, especially private companies, do not have a tradition of TCP/IP expertise. This is not surprising, because the number of qualified technical personnel in any area does not tend to double annually. The exponential growth of the use of TCP/IP has outstripped the capability of the traditional support community to cope.

Most of these LANs use Ethernet (or IEEE 802.3) technology with TCP/IP. Other LAN technologies, such as FDDI, are even more capable and are growing in use. FDDI, for example, is not yet widespread, and organizations using it tend to be very familiar with it, often having been involved in its development. The predominant LAN technology is still Ethernet, and this is the first LAN technology an organization new to TCP/IP is likely to use, if for no other reason because all the major UNIX workstation vendors sell their computers with a built in Ethernet interface. For these reasons, this book emphasises Ethernet as the local area network technology of choice.

The Book

There are many books about network protocol theory, a few about the networks constructed from those protocols, and some about writing network applications. Practical Internetworking with TCP/IP and UNIX is about making the most widespread protocol suite and the most widespread general purpose operating system work together in a practical distributed computing environment. This book is geared towards the knowledgeable UNIX administrator and user who lack a clear idea of what TCP/IP is and how it can be used. We cover a range of topics that are needed in setting up a working network. Also included is some background material on the history of TCP/IP and the Internet. Since TCP/IP and the Internet are living systems which continue to grow and evolve, we also briefly cover the Internet Standards process as well as other topics relevant to the functioning of the Internet community. This book avoids going into extreme detail on all topics, in the interests of space. Also this book is not written as a reference book, but rather as a guidebook with enough practical examples to emphasis the points being made.

Organization

The book is organized in three parts, Theory, Practice, and Advanced Topics plus a foreword, this preface, appendices, a glossary, and an index. References are included at the end of each chapter.

  • Foreword: In addition to the series foreword, the foreword by Vinton G. Cerf explains the significance of the book.
  • Part 1: Theory: The first part, which consists of five chapters, describes how the IP protocol suite is supposed to work. The first chapter provides an overview of the entire TCP/IP protocol suite, including lists of the protocols, and some information on how their specifications are produced.
    The second chapter gives a quick sketch of TCP/IP services. The third chapter describes the key protocol, IP itself. The fourth chapter examines the functions of transport protocols, such as TCP and UDP. The last chapter discusses the standard resource naming system used in the Internet community.
  • Part 2: Practice: The second part of the book examines how UNIX implementations of the TCP/IP protocols actually work. The three chapters in the part treat setting up basic network services, setting up and man aging electronic mail, and other network services.
  • Part 3: Advanced Topics: The third part of the book discusses advanced topics, in three chapters on integrating Apple Macintoshes and IBM PCs, network management, and network debugging.
  • Appendices: Two appendices provide information on where to find protocol specifications and the numerous software packages mentioned in the book, as well as most of the programming examples used in the book.
  • References, Glossary, and Index: Numerous bibliographic citations occur in the text, and the actual references are gathered at the end of each chapter. The glossary defines major (and many minor) terms and acronyms. The index indicates where they are used in the text. Expansions of acronyms are given both in the glossary and in the index for easy reference.

Readers

Beginning UNIX network system administrators will want to read the whole book, in order. Readers already familiar with the TCP/IP protocols will probably also find much useful information in the first part of the book, but may want to skip directly to the practical details in the second part.

Experienced system administrators may want to skip directly to the advanced topics in the third part.

Familiarity with network protocol theory will be most helpful to all readers. We include some detail on the theory of how TCP/IP works, but we must assume some basic networking concepts.

Terminology

The book is written in American English. Some familiarity with networking and UNIX is assumed, but jargon is explained when used. The glossary contains definitions of difficult terms.

Acknowledgements

We would like to thank the reviewers, John Amason, Wayne Hathaway, Doug McCallum, Eugene Pinsky, Clyde Poole, William Selmeier, Barry Shein, Kean Stump, and Edward Vielmetti. All of them gave us valuable insights in how to better present the subject. We would also like to thank Laura Michaels, the copyeditor, who also added much to the clarity of the final book. And finally, we thank the editorial and production staff of Addison-Wesley, Tom Stone, Debbie Lafferty, and Patsy DuMoulin.



0201586290P04062001
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Pt. 1 Theory 1
Ch. 1 What is TCP/IP? 3
Ch. 2 TCP/IP Services 39
Ch. 3 How IP Works: The Key to Internetworking 51
Ch. 4 Transport Protocol Basics 89
Ch. 5 Naming Hosts and Other Objects 107
Pt. 2 Practice 133
Ch. 6 Setting Up Basic Network Services 135
Ch. 7 Electronic Mail 187
Ch. 8 Sendmail Architecture and Configuration 207
Ch. 9 Other Network Services 265
Pt. 3 Advanced Topics 315
Ch. 10 Macintosh and PC Integration 317
Ch. 11 Managing the Network 343
Ch. 12 Network Debugging 361
Appendix A Access 409
Appendix B Program Listings 429
Glossary 449
Index 469
Read More Show Less

Preface

This book is a practical guide for building TCP/IP networks with the UNIX operating system, and for using both TCP/IP and UNIX to integrate other network protocols and operating systems into a distributed computing environment. The book is not a protocol theory book, not a programming text, and not a user tutorial. It is about how to make whole networks actually work in practice.

The TCP/IP protocols are used in tens of thousands of networks to connect millions of machines throughout the world. The largest of the collection of networks that use TCP/IP is the Internet. The Internet is the world's largest computer network and has been doubling in size each year since 1988. It had perhaps ten million users by 1993: researchers and academics, corporate employees, librarians and politicians, schoolteachers, and the general public. This global network commune has no central authority. The Internet works because of general agreement on network protocols used and because of cooperation among the users for the good of the network.

Much of the growth of the Internet is in local area networks (LANs) inside both private and public organizations, as opposed to wide area networks (WANs). Some of these organizations are universities, government agencies, or government contractors, which were the historical research and academic base of TCP/IP. Other LANs are privately owned enterprise networks inside commercial companies. Many enterprise networks are not interconnected directly with the Internet proper, or are deliberately firewalled from it, so that only authorized corporate users mayhave access.

The LANs, whether interconnected with the Internet or not, are growing very rapidly, and more of them appear daily. Many of the organizations behind these networks, especially private companies, do not have a tradition of TCP/IP expertise. This is not surprising, because the number of qualified technical personnel in any area does not tend to double annually. The exponential growth of the use of TCP/IP has outstripped the capability of the traditional support community to cope.

Most of these LANs use Ethernet (or IEEE 802.3) technology with TCP/IP. Other LAN technologies, such as FDDI, are even more capable and are growing in use. FDDI, for example, is not yet widespread, and organizations using it tend to be very familiar with it, often having been involved in its development. The predominant LAN technology is still Ethernet, and this is the first LAN technology an organization new to TCP/IP is likely to use, if for no other reason because all the major UNIX workstation vendors sell their computers with a built in Ethernet interface. For these reasons, this book emphasises Ethernet as the local area network technology of choice.

The Book

There are many books about network protocol theory, a few about the networks constructed from those protocols, and some about writing network applications. Practical Internetworking with TCP/IP and UNIX is about making the most widespread protocol suite and the most widespread general purpose operating system work together in a practical distributed computing environment. This book is geared towards the knowledgeable UNIX administrator and user who lack a clear idea of what TCP/IP is and how it can be used. We cover a range of topics that are needed in setting up a working network. Also included is some background material on the history of TCP/IP and the Internet. Since TCP/IP and the Internet are living systems which continue to grow and evolve, we also briefly cover the Internet Standards process as well as other topics relevant to the functioning of the Internet community. This book avoids going into extreme detail on all topics, in the interests of space. Also this book is not written as a reference book, but rather as a guidebook with enough practical examples to emphasis the points being made.

Organization

The book is organized in three parts, Theory, Practice, and Advanced Topics plus a foreword, this preface, appendices, a glossary, and an index. References are included at the end of each chapter.

  • Foreword: In addition to the series foreword, the foreword by Vinton G. Cerf explains the significance of the book.
  • Part 1: Theory: The first part, which consists of five chapters, describes how the IP protocol suite is supposed to work. The first chapter provides an overview of the entire TCP/IP protocol suite, including lists of the protocols, and some information on how their specifications are produced.
    The second chapter gives a quick sketch of TCP/IP services. The third chapter describes the key protocol, IP itself. The fourth chapter examines the functions of transport protocols, such as TCP and UDP. The last chapter discusses the standard resource naming system used in the Internet community.
  • Part 2: Practice: The second part of the book examines how UNIX implementations of the TCP/IP protocols actually work. The three chapters in the part treat setting up basic network services, setting up and man aging electronic mail, and other network services.
  • Part 3: Advanced Topics: The third part of the book discusses advanced topics, in three chapters on integrating Apple Macintoshes and IBM PCs, network management, and network debugging.
  • Appendices: Two appendices provide information on where to find protocol specifications and the numerous software packages mentioned in the book, as well as most of the programming examples used in the book.
  • References, Glossary, and Index: Numerous bibliographic citations occur in the text, and the actual references are gathered at the end of each chapter. The glossary defines major (and many minor) terms and acronyms. The index indicates where they are used in the text. Expansions of acronyms are given both in the glossary and in the index for easy reference.

Readers

Beginning UNIX network system administrators will want to read the whole book, in order. Readers already familiar with the TCP/IP protocols will probably also find much useful information in the first part of the book, but may want to skip directly to the practical details in the second part.

Experienced system administrators may want to skip directly to the advanced topics in the third part.

Familiarity with network protocol theory will be most helpful to all readers. We include some detail on the theory of how TCP/IP works, but we must assume some basic networking concepts.

Terminology

The book is written in American English. Some familiarity with networking and UNIX is assumed, but jargon is explained when used. The glossary contains definitions of difficult terms.

Acknowledgements

We would like to thank the reviewers, John Amason, Wayne Hathaway, Doug McCallum, Eugene Pinsky, Clyde Poole, William Selmeier, Barry Shein, Kean Stump, and Edward Vielmetti. All of them gave us valuable insights in how to better present the subject. We would also like to thank Laura Michaels, the copyeditor, who also added much to the clarity of the final book. And finally, we thank the editorial and production staff of Addison-Wesley, Tom Stone, Debbie Lafferty, and Patsy DuMoulin.



Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)