Practical Ruby Gems / Edition 1

Practical Ruby Gems / Edition 1

4.0 1
by David Berube
     
 

ISBN-10: 1590598113

ISBN-13: 9781590598115

Pub. Date: 04/15/2007

Publisher: Apress

This book is a comprehensive guide to utilizing and creating Ruby Gems. Coverage provides an enormous code library that will help developers improve their projects. It details 34 of the best and most useful Gems, including ones to speed up web applications, process credit card payments, produce PDF documents, read and update RSS feeds, and acquire real-time

Overview

This book is a comprehensive guide to utilizing and creating Ruby Gems. Coverage provides an enormous code library that will help developers improve their projects. It details 34 of the best and most useful Gems, including ones to speed up web applications, process credit card payments, produce PDF documents, read and update RSS feeds, and acquire real-time shipping prices from FedEx and UPS. Each of these also comes complete with actual use cases and code examples that readers can immediately use in their own projects. In addition, the book describes how readers can package and distribute their own Ruby Gems.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781590598115
Publisher:
Apress
Publication date:
04/15/2007
Series:
Expert's Voice in Open Source Series
Edition description:
2007
Pages:
271
Product dimensions:
7.00(w) x 9.25(h) x 9.25(d)

Table of Contents

  1. What Is RubyGems?
  2. Installing RubyGems
  3. Using RubyGems in Your Code
  4. Managing Installed Gem Versions
  5. Data Access with the ActiveRecord Gem
  6. Easy Text Markup with the BlueCloth Gem
  7. Creating Web Applications with Camping
  8. Creating Command-Line Utilities with cmdparse
  9. HTML Templating with erubis
  10. Parsing Feeds with feedtools
  11. Creating Graphical User Interfaces with fxruby
  12. Retrieving Stock Quotes with YahooFinance
  13. Parsing HTML with hpricot
  14. Writing HTML as Ruby with Markaby
  15. Parsing CSV with fastercsv
  16. Multiple Dispatch with multi
  17. Serving Web Applications with mongrel
  18. Transferring Files Securely with net-sftp
  19. Executing Commands on Remote Servers with net-ssh
  20. Validating Credit Cards with creditcard
  21. Writing PDFs with pdf-writer
  22. Handling Recurring Events with runt
  23. Building Websites with Rails
  24. Automating Development Tasks with rake
  25. Manipulating Images with RMagick
  26. Speeding Up Web Applications with memcache-client
  27. Managing Zip Archives with rubyzip
  28. Speeding Up Function Calls with memoize
  29. Tagging MP3 Files with id3lib-ruby
  30. Shortening URLs with shorturl
  31. Creating Standalone Ruby Applications with rubyscript2exe
  32. Cleaning Dirty HTML with tidy
  33. Parsing XML with xml-simple
  34. Creating Our Own Gems
  35. Distributing Gems


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Practical Ruby Gems 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Practical Ruby Gems, by David Berube (APress) digs into Rubygems ¿ the Ruby package management system. David presents a quick overview of Rubygems and its usage, then offers an overview of 29 popular gems, and finally shows you how to roll your own. Overall, this is a solid book. The writing is almost alarmingly to the point ¿ think O¿Reilly Pocket Reference style, but it does cover the material reasonably well. There is a pleasant variety in the gems presented, and I saw a few that I wasn¿t aware of (like FastCSV) which will definitely be useful to me. Each gem is presented with a short application that carefully balances meatiness against ease of comprehension. I¿m happy to report that Practical Ruby Gems is fairly well indexed. Some of the more complex gems (like ActiveRecord, FxRuby and Ruby on Rails) are given a very thin treatment, and I think that¿s fair enough, given the format of the book. ActiveRecord, let alone Rails, is large enough to have its own book. Other than that, my only complaint lies in the amateurish page layout. The transition from prose to sample code is delimited with only a change of font, and sample output is separated from code with a simple horizontal rule. This means that my eye must hunt and peck through the page when I¿m skipping around, looking for that particular line of sample code that I need. I would recommend this book to anyone looking for a high level overview of what¿s out there in the way of free Ruby libraries. I will also probably refer to the book if and when I roll my own gems.