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Practical Subversion

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Overview

Practical Subversion, Second Edition draws on the experience of its authors, Daniel Berlin and Garrett Rooney—both Subversion project members—to guide you through a complete introduction to this popular code management solution.This edition has been updated to reflect changes to the popular Subversion version control system. After a crash course on Subversions key features, including a theme project that youre encouraged to follow, you’ll explore best practices, migration tips for moving from other versioning ...

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Paperback (2nd ed. 2007)
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Overview

Practical Subversion, Second Edition draws on the experience of its authors, Daniel Berlin and Garrett Rooney—both Subversion project members—to guide you through a complete introduction to this popular code management solution.This edition has been updated to reflect changes to the popular Subversion version control system. After a crash course on Subversions key features, including a theme project that youre encouraged to follow, you’ll explore best practices, migration tips for moving from other versioning solutions, Subversion integration, and an overview of the Subversion APIs.

Effective developers and system administrators alike understand that their success is related to their ability to manage the dozens, sometimes hundreds, of files that they come into contact with on a regular basis. This file management includes determining a files changes over time, accommodating simultaneous edits by multiple users, and even reverting a file to an earlier version if a mistake or deletion has been made. Capitalizing on such capabilities requires a version control system like Subversion. You’ll want to pick up a copy of this book because it is

  • The most up-to-date book on the popular Subversion version control system
  • Authored by two Subversion project contributors
  • More than a mere introduction, covering best practices, migration issues, and more effective versioning through tool integration
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781590597538
  • Publisher: Apress
  • Publication date: 11/21/2006
  • Series: Expert's Voice in Open Source Series
  • Edition description: 2nd ed. 2007
  • Edition number: 2
  • Pages: 304
  • Sales rank: 1,399,375
  • Product dimensions: 9.61 (w) x 6.69 (h) x 0.65 (d)

Meet the Author

Garrett Rooney is a software engineer on the version control team at CollabNet, where he works full time on Subversion and other related technologies. Rooney attended Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, New York, where he managed to complete three years towards a mechanical engineering degree before coming to his senses and realizing he wanted to get a job where someone would pay him to play with computers. Since then, Rooney completed a computer science degree at RPI and has spent far too much time working on a wide variety of open source projects, most notably Subversion. He's also a member of the Apache Software Foundation, where he works on the Apache Portable Runtime and the Apache HTTP Server, as well as helps to maintain the ASF Subversion repository.

Daniel Berlin works in Washington, D.C. for Google as a member of its technical staff and as a lawyer. Prior to his work with Google, Berlin was an advisory engineer with IBM Research in New York, where he worked on open source projects such as Subversion and GCC. He was responsible for a number of improvements to the source code base of Subversion, including a new delta storage algorithm and various caching improvements to the file system back end. Berlin earned a law degree from the George Washington University School of Law and a bachelor of science degree in computer science from the University of Rochester.

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Table of Contents

Ch. 1 Introducing subversion 1
Ch. 2 A crash course in subversion 17
Ch. 3 Repository administration 63
Ch. 4 Migrating from other version control systems 97
Ch. 5 Advanced Apache integration 117
Ch. 6 Best practices 137
Ch. 7 Integrating subversion with other tools 161
Ch. 8 Using the subversion APIs 179
App. A Subversion command glossary 253
App. B Subversion compared to other version control systems 291
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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 11, 2004

    Appendix B has good comparative analysis

    Version control of source code is one of these indispensible things when running a software project. Anybody who has ever worked in a commercial project with 2 or more programmers should quickly understand the need. Well, recently, a new open source program, called Subversion, has arisen to handle version control. Rooney offers a detailed explanation of its usage. Assuming that you have used any other competing system, like CVS, RCS, Perforce or Visual Source Safe, then the text should be readily intelligible. He gives a comprehensive coverage of all that Subversion offers. But you know what? Aside from what the user has to deal with, you can probably safely disregard certain parts of the book. Because most readers are programmers, and they just want whatever versioning system they use to work. So while Subversion has a better API for third parties to build upon, unless you're one of those third parties, this advantage is moot. Turn to Appendix B. This is a concise comparative analysis of Subversion vis-a-vis the other versioning programs. If you are still undecided whether to adopt Subversion, the Appendix is the most useful part of the book. For example, Rooney compares Subversion to CVS, which is probably the most common versioning system in use. CVS does not version directories. A glaring defect. Especially because in large projects, the directory tree can encode crucial top level information about the project. Subversion handles directory versioning. But its workflow of 'check out, change, update, commit' is basically the same as CVS. So your work patterns don't have to change much. The biggest other difference between Subversion and CVS is described by the Appendix as how Subversion sends diffs of file changes to its silo. Whereas CVS is more likely to send full files. So less bandwidth and storage. Subversion scales better for large projects.

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