Practice Makes Perfect Trigonometry

Practice Makes Perfect Trigonometry

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by Carolyn Wheater
     
 

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Don't be tripped up by trigonometry. Master this math with practice, practice, practice!

Practice Makes Perfect: Trigonometry is a comprehensive guide and workbook that covers all the basics of trigonometry that you need to understand this subject. Each chapter focuses on one major topic, with thorough explanations and many illustrative

Overview

Don't be tripped up by trigonometry. Master this math with practice, practice, practice!

Practice Makes Perfect: Trigonometry is a comprehensive guide and workbook that covers all the basics of trigonometry that you need to understand this subject. Each chapter focuses on one major topic, with thorough explanations and many illustrative examples, so you can learn at your own pace and really absorb the information. You get to apply your knowledge and practice what you've learned through a variety of exercises, with an answer key for instant feedback. Offering a winning solution for getting a handle on math right away, Practice Makes Perfect: Trigonometry is your ultimate resource for building a solid understanding of trigonometry fundamentals.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780071761796
Publisher:
McGraw-Hill Professional Publishing
Publication date:
11/11/2011
Series:
McGraw-Hill Practice Makes Perfect Series
Edition description:
List
Pages:
208
Sales rank:
546,164
Product dimensions:
8.40(w) x 10.80(h) x 0.50(d)

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

Carolyn Wheater teaches middle school and upper school mathematics at the Nightingale-Bamford School in New York City. She has taught math and computer technology for 30 years to students from preschool through college. She is a member of National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) and the Association of Teachers in Independent Schools.

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Practice Makes Perfect Trigonometry 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Your stories satisfy a certain thirst in my brain!!!! Please keep going!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Really good job!!! I love the story!!! You MUST keep going!!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
That was awesome!!!!!:) KEEP IT UP!!!:) - ari
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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