The Practice of Charity; Individual, Associated and Organized

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IV. SUBSTITUTES FOR CHARITY Charity does not embody itself completely in private societies and public relief systems. While organized agencies necessarily attract attention in any formal study, since it is easier to discover them,...
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Overview

Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.
This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
IV. SUBSTITUTES FOR CHARITY Charity does not embody itself completely in private societies and public relief systems. While organized agencies necessarily attract attention in any formal study, since it is easier to discover them, it must not be forgotten that the aid extended by private individuals to those in distress is of vast amount in the aggregate, although usually unrecorded. Says Mr. George Silsbee Hale in the " Memorial History of Boston ": " There is, there can be, no record of the work and gifts of generous stewards of the abundance which has rewarded lives of labor; of the men whom the living recall, the steady stream of whose annual beneficence was a king's ransom; of those whom the living know, whose annual gifts are an ample fortune, or of the ' honorable women' whose lives are full of good deeds and almsgiving." It is a question whether the unmeasured, but certainly large, amount of neighborly assistance given in the tenement houses of the city, precisely as in a New England village or in a frontier settlement, does not rank first of all among the means for the alleviation of distress. The proverbial kindness of the poor to the poor finds ample illustration in thecongested quarters of the city, even though physical proximity there counts least in the feeling of responsibility for neighbors. One of the most interesting generalizations made by Mr. Charles Booth is that, while all classes in London give largely in charity, the poorest people give the most in proportion to what they have. This is equally true in American communities. What the housekeeper and the fellow-tenants do for the temporary relief of those whose income is cut off by accident, sickness, or misfortune must be given a large place in any statement of relief systems. Such assistance as t...
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781155115818
  • Publisher: General Books LLC
  • Publication date: 10/12/2012
  • Pages: 52
  • Product dimensions: 7.44 (w) x 9.69 (h) x 0.11 (d)

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