A Practitioner's Guide to Software Test Design / Edition 1

Hardcover (Print)
Buy New
Buy New from BN.com
$63.00
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $21.20
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 71%)
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (14) from $21.20   
  • New (8) from $62.99   
  • Used (6) from $21.20   

Overview

Here's a comprehensive, up-to-date and practical introduction to software test design. This invaluable book presents all the important test design techniques in a single place and in a consistent, and easy-to-digest format. An immediately useful handbook for test engineers, developers, quality assurance professionals, and requirements and systems analysts, it enables you to: choose the best test case design, find software defects in less time and with fewer resources, and develop optimal strategies that help reduce the likelihood of costly errors. It also assists you in estimating the effort, time and cost of good testing.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781580537919
  • Publisher: Artech House, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 12/1/2003
  • Series: Artech House Computing Library
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 320
  • Sales rank: 792,671
  • Product dimensions: 6.74 (w) x 9.60 (h) x 0.74 (d)

Meet the Author

Lee Copeland is a consultant in the areas of testing methodologies, test management and web site testing at Software Quality Engineering. He has more than twenty-five years experience as an information systems professional specializing in software development and process improvement.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Introduction. The Testing Process. Case Studies. Black Box Testing Techniques. Equivalence Class Testing. Boundary Value Testing. Decision Table Testing. Pairwise Testing. State-Transition Testing. Domain Analysis Testing. Use Case Testing. White Box Testing Techniques. Control Flow Testing. Data Flow Testing. Testing Paradigms. Scripted Testing. Exploratory Testing. Test Planning. Supporting Technologies. Defect Taxonomies. When To Stop Testing. Some Final Thoughts. Case Studies. Bibliography.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 1 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 13, 2004

    New and Classic Techniques Together in One Great Book

    This is a great read on an important topic. Lee Copeland has done a super job in bringing together a diverse set of test techniques in a way that will make sense to testers of all experience levels. This book also brings many of the techniques we have used over the years, such as boundary value testing and equivalence classes, up to date with newer techniques such as pairwise testing and use cases for testing. It was interesting to read some of the quotes from Boris Beizer and other early testing authors. Some of those nuggets, such as the example of ¿Kiddie Pool vs. Real Pool¿ had a big impact on me years ago as I developed my understanding of what testing is about. Copeland achieves a nice level of coverage in this book, as he addresses black box and white box testing, as well as testing paradigms that shape the way someone may look at testing. The trade-offs between exploratory and scripted approaches are examined in particular. I really like the readability of this book, due in large part to the humor that Copeland sprinkles through the book just when you need a smile. Copeland also does an excellent job of thoroughly explaining by example how the various testing techniques are applied. He takes each technique step-by-step and breaks it down so that even a beginner can understand. I found the chapter devoted to bug taxonomies very helpful by providing the lists by Beizer, Caner, Binder, Whittaker and others in a single location. I often tell my students to ¿start a bug collection¿ to understand the defects most common in the software they test. This is a natural and effective starting point for process improvement. The bug taxonomy can give you a head start on your own bug collection. I can highly recommend this book to any tester. If you are looking for a self-study book in test planning, this is a great place to start!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)