Pragmatic Project Automation

Overview

Forget wizards, you need a slave—someone to do your repetitive, tedious and boring tasks, without complaint and without pay, so you'll have more time to design and write exciting code. Indeed, that's what computers are for. You can enlist your own computer to automate all of your project's repetitive tasks, ranging from individual builds and running unit tests through to full product release, customer deployment, and monitoring the system.Many teams try to do these tasks by hand. That's usually a really bad idea:...

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Overview

Forget wizards, you need a slave—someone to do your repetitive, tedious and boring tasks, without complaint and without pay, so you'll have more time to design and write exciting code. Indeed, that's what computers are for. You can enlist your own computer to automate all of your project's repetitive tasks, ranging from individual builds and running unit tests through to full product release, customer deployment, and monitoring the system.Many teams try to do these tasks by hand. That's usually a really bad idea: people just aren't as good at repetitive tasks as machines. You run the risk of doing it differently the one time it matters, on one machine but not another, or doing it just plain wrong. But the computer can do these tasks for you the same way, time after time, without bothering you. You can transform these labor-intensive, boring and potentially risky chores into automatic, background processes that just work.In this eagerly anticipated book, you'll find a variety of popular, open-source tools to help automate your project. With this book, you will learn:

  • How to make your build processes accurate, reliable, fast, and easy.
  • How to build complex systems at the touch of a button.
  • How to build, test, and release software automatically, with no human intervention.
  • Technologies and tools available for automation: which to use and when.
  • Tricks and tips from the masters (do you know how to have your cell phone tell you that your build just failed?)
You'll find easy-to-implement recipes to automate your Java project, using the same popular style as the rest of our Jolt Productivity Award-winning Starter Kit books. Armed with plenty of examples and concrete, pragmatic advice, you'll find it's easy to get started and reap the benefits of modern software development. You can begin to enjoy pragmatic, automatic, unattended software production that's reliable and accurate every time.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780974514031
  • Publisher: Pragmatic Programmers, LLC, The
  • Publication date: 8/23/2004
  • Series: Pragmatic Starter Kit Series
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 176
  • Product dimensions: 7.48 (w) x 8.96 (h) x 0.58 (d)

Meet the Author

Clark is a consultant, author, speaker, and programmer. He helps teams build better software faster through his company, Clarkware Consulting, Inc.

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Table of Contents

About the Starter Kit ix
Preface xi
1 Introduction 1
1.1 Look Ma, No Hands! 1
1.2 Types of Automation 4
1.3 Questions About Automation 6
1.4 Road Map 9
2 One-Step Builds 11
2.1 Building Software Is Like Making Sausage 11
2.2 Choosing a Project Directory Structure 16
2.3 Making Your First Build 17
2.4 Building with Ant 20
2.5 Taste-Testing the Build 30
2.6 Cleaning Up 35
2.7 Scripting a Build 36
2.8 Getting an Early Start 40
3 Scheduled Builds 43
3.1 Scheduling Your First Build 44
3.2 Putting a Build on CruiseControl 47
3.3 Running CruiseControl 59
3.4 Publishing the Build Status 64
3.5 Scaling Up 69
4 Push-Button Releases 73
4.1 Releasing Early and Often 73
4.2 Preparing for Your First Release 74
4.3 Packaging the Release 80
4.4 Generating the Release 87
4.5 Tagging the Release 92
4.6 Handing Off the Release 94
4.7 Automating the Release Procedure 94
4.8 Generating Daily Distributions 96
5 Installation and Deployment 99
5.1 Delivering the Goods 99
5.2 Installing the Standard Distribution File 100
5.3 Troubleshooting by Phone 101
5.4 Troubleshooting with Diagnostic Tests 103
5.5 Enhancing Your Installed Image 109
5.6 Deploying Hosted Applications 117
5.7 Auto-Updating Installed Applications 122
6 Monitoring 127
6.1 Monitoring Scheduled Builds 127
6.2 Getting Feedback from Visual Devices 130
6.3 Monitoring Your Java Process 135
6.4 Checking Up on Your Web Application 136
6.5 Watching Log Files 138
6.6 Monitoring with log4j 140
6.7 Building Trip Wires with RSS 143
6.8 Monitoring Health with a Debug Command 145
6.9 Creating a Crash Report 146
6.10 3-2-1... 147
6.11 Automate! 149
A Resources 151
A.1 On the Web 151
A.2 Bibliography 152
B Pragmatic Project Automation: Summary 153
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Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 24, 2004

    Will save you time and trouble. Highly recommended.

    This book will save you from hours of work and from many headaches. Mike Clark's 'Pragmatic Project Automation' will show you how to automate any aspect of your project that you find repetitive. Clark starts by describing how to automate a build script using Ant. There are entire books on this subject but 'Pragmatic Project Automation' does a great job of distilling the essentials of what you need to know to get started (and for most projects in total). Once you have an automated build, the next step is having it run automatically. Clark describes how to do this with Cruise Control, a tool that will build a system whenever new code gets checked in. This book goes well beyond just automated builds, however. We next learn how to automate releases, including generating all necessary distribution files. Next up are how to automate the installation and deployment processes. Finally we learn how to monitor both our build process and our deployed applications. The book even goes so far as to tell us how to monitor the build process with a pair of lava lamps. I highly recommend this book to anyone working with Java applications of any size.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 31, 2004

    Desktop Java project refrence

    Mike's book should be a desktop reference for anyone working on Java projects. He first gives you a high level overview of why a concept is needed on your project. Then he shows you which product to use, and gives you a practical working example. Whether you are learning how to use various build tools (like Ant or CruiseControl) or refining your existing project, this is a must have book. It's a 'report from the trenches', not an academic analysis. You can read this book and boost your productivity the first day.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 7, 2004

    Automating build and unit testing

    Aimed at Java programmers who are working on a project and who need to install a disciplined project framework on themselves. Clark assumes you're clued into the utility of having a version control system and of writing unit tests. Those were the subjects of his two earlier books in this series. Now he shows plausible next steps in automating certain development steps. A lot of attention is focused on the build. Naturally. You can see how to use Ant and a lesser known open source program, CruiseControl, for automated building and running of unit tests. This is the most important part of the book and you should focus your attention here. Clark also discusses other topics, like deploying over the web. Useful, but subsidiary. There is very little jargon or acronym soup to navigate. Something to be thankful for.

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