×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

The Prairie: A Tale
     

The Prairie: A Tale

3.7 13
by James Cooper, Summit Press
 

See All Formats & Editions

This collector-quality edition includes the complete text of James Fenimore Cooper's classic tale of the conflicts and complications brought by the movement of settlers out onto the Great Plains in a freshly edited and newly typeset edition.

With a large 7.44"x9.69" page size, this Summit Classic edition is printed on hefty bright white paper with a fully laminated

Overview

This collector-quality edition includes the complete text of James Fenimore Cooper's classic tale of the conflicts and complications brought by the movement of settlers out onto the Great Plains in a freshly edited and newly typeset edition.

With a large 7.44"x9.69" page size, this Summit Classic edition is printed on hefty bright white paper with a fully laminated cover featuring an original full color design. Page headers and proper placement of footnotes exemplify the attention to detail given this volume.

"The Prairie," published in 1827, was the third of James Fenimore Cooper's five novels comprising the "Leatherstocking Tales" saga, although the time period in which the story is set makes it the fifth and last chronologically.

Set in 1804, the tale follows the adventures of Natty Bumppo, over 80 years of age and ranging the plains, having departed his home along the now-vanished New York frontier in search of open country. Called "the trapper" or "the old man" and never referred to by name, numerous references to the previous two novels, as well as the stories and characters in the two which would not be written until years later, leave no doubt that the old trapper is the "Leatherstocking." Happening upon a party of settlers heading across the plains, the resourceful old trapper leads his companions through a series of harrowing adventures involving the hostile Teton tribe, the friendly Pawnees, led by the noble warrior Hard Heart, the shiftless settlers Ishmael Bush and Abiram White, the honorable Captain Duncan Uncas Middleton and the bee-hunter, Paul Hover. As in many of Cooper's tales, a romance lies near the center of the story but, as is typical with Cooper, it is secondary to the adventure in his story telling.

While criticized in later years for the use of oversimplified or stereotypical characters, as in his other works Cooper often explores complex themes and values through the juxtaposition of these characters, such as the contrast between the "book smart" Hover and the experienced but under-educated Bumppo, and the relationship of the characters to their environment and their reactions to situations. While Cooper seems inclined to the "noble savage" view of American Indians, they are among the most complex characters in his books, not simply pigeonholed as "good" or "bad". And Cooper's view of the expansion of civilization often seems ambivalent, recognizing the advantages and values of progress, but questioning whether some of the aspects of settling the wilderness really constitute "progress" at all.

Less well-known than "The Last of the Mohicans" or "The Deerslayer", "The Prairie" is an admirable winding-up of the Leatherstocking Tales saga.

With the publication of "The Spy" in 1821, James Fenimore Cooper became an international figure and the first authentic American novelist, free of the forms and conventions of the British fiction of the day. In a writing career spanning thirty years, over thirty novels and an extensive body of lesser works, with "The Leatherstocking Tales" he became the first great interpreter of the American experience, chronicling the adventures of the indomitable Natty Bumppo, known variously as "Hawkeye," "Deerslayer," "Pathfinder," "Leatherstocking" and other names, from the colonial Indian wars through the early expansion into the vast western plains.

Published between 1823 and 1841, beginning with "The Pioneers" and ending with "The Deerslayer", the tales are set against historical events ranging from 1740 to 1804, with Cooper taking some literary license with the actual chronology of events, probably to avoid having Bumppo ranging the Great Plains at over 90 years of age.

This edition of "The Prairie" is the third volume in a new series of the complete Leatherstocking Tales to be released by Summit Classic Press in the coming months.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781475087864
Publisher:
CreateSpace Publishing
Publication date:
03/28/2012
Pages:
228
Product dimensions:
7.44(w) x 9.69(h) x 0.48(d)

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

The Prairie 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 13 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
THE PRAIRIE begins in 1804, 500 miles west of the Mississippi River and ends there a year later. The land now belongs to the USA, after the purchase of Louisiana. Rogers and Clark are exploring farther north. *** Nathaniel 'Natty' Bumppo aka Hawkeye, Deerslayer, Pathfinder and other evolving names is 87 years old. He no longer thinks of himself as a hunter but a simple trapper of furs and hides. He runs afoul of a crude family led by Ishmael Bush, all rugged individualists like himelf. They are traveling with an eccentric medical doctor who is also a naturalist exploring new flora and fauna. They have kidnapped, without the doctor's knowledge, the beautiful daughter of the richest Creole in newly purchased Louisiana. Natty throws in as an ally of various parties: her army Captain fiance who is on her trail, a wandering bee trailer and a large band of benign Pawnees to see justice done. *** In the process of setting free two women unwillingly with the Bushes, Natty and others skirmish with thieving Sioux who set the prairie on fire to trap the rescuers and the two young women, including the refined niece of one of the rascally group. In the end, the paterfamilias of the Bush family squatters does rough frontier justice to all parties, including imposing a brutal death sentence on his wife's brother who had killed their eldest son. *** Read THE PRAIRIE for its description of an American west in which white men were still rare, and for the final months of Natty Bumppo, a haunting figure who catches much of the pioneering American spirit that made America America. The writing is vivid, memorable and the history of the frontier is of seminal importance. -OOO-
Guest More than 1 year ago
I actually enjoyed this more than The Last of the Mohicans, Cooper's most popular book. The Prairie tells a very interesting story, and no detail is too trivial to be excluded. Overall, although it certainly drifted into excess obscurity at times, in a larger scope The Prairie was an extemely rewarding read. It's worthy to note that the historical context of this book seems to be quite accurate.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Is it any good?