Precepting Medical Students in the Office

Precepting Medical Students in the Office

by Paul M. Paulman
     
 

"Medical knowledge and training have evolved dramatically over the centuries, but the tradition of dedicated physicians sharing their knowledge, skills, experience, and wisdom with the next generation of young medical students is still vital. Much of today's medical training is of a technical nature, but in reality physicians are as much artists as technicians, and

Overview

"Medical knowledge and training have evolved dramatically over the centuries, but the tradition of dedicated physicians sharing their knowledge, skills, experience, and wisdom with the next generation of young medical students is still vital. Much of today's medical training is of a technical nature, but in reality physicians are as much artists as technicians, and the art of medicine is a skill that cannot be learned in a classroom. As Hippocrates put it a long time ago, the doctor who despises the knowledge acquired by the ancients is foolish." —from the Foreword, by Stuart P. Embury, M.D.

As medical education curricula continue to evolve, many medical schools are implementing programs that allow students to spend a portion of their time observing primary care physicians in their offices. Currently, more than 20,000 physicians are precepting medical students in this way, and the number will grow as more and more educational programs attempt to move medical student experiences into the community. In Precepting Medical Students in the Office, Paul M. Paulman, M.D., Jeffrey L. Susman, M.D., and Cheryl A. Abboud, M.P.A., bring together experts in the field of family medicine to provide a how-to guide to educating medical students in the patient-care setting. The contributors cover subjects that range from defining the scope of preceptorship to managing the costs, working with medical schools and local hospitals, integrating the student into the practice, providing feedback, problem learners, and teaching styles.

Section topics: Introduction to Community-Based Precepting • Characteristics and Needs of Learners • Clinical Teaching • Organization of the Preceptorship Curriculum • Relationships to Medical Schools and Other Agencies • Legal and Ethical Aspects of Precepting • Faculty Benefits and Resources

Editorial Reviews

Journal of the American Board of Family Practice
The editors are to be applauded for giving us an excellent how-to-manual devoted to this essential aspect of the art of medical education.

Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Dawn E. DeWitt, MD, MSC, FACP (University of Washington)
Description: Three experts in family medicine edit this multiauthored handbook on community precepting.
Purpose: The editors' purpose is to present their collective wisdom and experience on how to set up and conduct community preceptorships. This much-needed book addresses both logistical and precepting issues.
Audience: This book is aimed at beginning medical students or experienced precepters who want to improve their skills. It will also serve academic and community programs that are starting preceptorships or beginning faculty development programs. The authors include program directors, residents in family medicine, and community physicians.
Features: Relatively concise chapters with bulleted key points make the book accessible for quick reference. There is much practical information, such as nice chapters on logistics and the costs of precepting. Significant but intended repetition is somewhat confusing — the learning needs of medical students are covered in different ways in several chapters and the feedback chapters could be easily combined. Multiple acronyms for teaching and feedback seem daunting so that practical "how to" summary tools would be helpful additions. Names and addresses of key specialty organizations are provided.
Assessment: This helpful book provides start-to-finish information on preceptorships. Some chapters are "hands on," while others are more academic. As a co-author of another recent book for preceptors entitled Teaching in Your Office (ACP-ASIM, 2001), I find the two books companions in intent and some content, but with very different approaches. The book reviewed here has a broader preceptorship focus, including relationships with institutions (how to find housing, ethics, sample contract with a university) with very short accessible chapters, while the book I co-authored is somewhat shorter and more focused on precepting skills (with tools for preceptors; summary boxes with examples; and appendixes with learner contracts, skills inventory, precepting models, and feedback evaluation tools).
3 Stars from Doody
Dawn E. DeWitt
Three experts in family medicine edit this multiauthored handbook on community precepting. The editors' purpose is to present their collective wisdom and experience on how to set up and conduct community preceptorships. This much-needed book addresses both logistical and precepting issues. This book is aimed at beginning medical students or experienced precepters who want to improve their skills. It will also serve academic and community programs that are starting preceptorships or beginning faculty development programs. The authors include program directors, residents in family medicine, and community physicians. Relatively concise chapters with bulleted key points make the book accessible for quick reference. There is much practical information, such as nice chapters on logistics and the costs of precepting. Significant but intended repetition is somewhat confusing -- the learning needs of medical students are covered in different ways in several chapters and the feedback chapters could be easily combined. Multiple acronyms for teaching and feedback seem daunting so that practical ""how to"" summary tools would be helpful additions. Names and addresses of key specialty organizations are provided. This helpful book provides start-to-finish information on preceptorships. Some chapters are ""hands on,"" while others are more academic. As a co-author of another recent book for preceptors entitled Teaching in Your Office (ACP-ASIM, 2001), I find the two books companions in intent and some content, but with very different approaches. The book reviewed here has a broader preceptorship focus, including relationships with institutions (how to find housing, ethics, sample contractwith a university) with very short accessible chapters, while the book I co-authored is somewhat shorter and more focused on precepting skills (with tools for preceptors; summary boxes with examples; and appendixes with learner contracts, skills inventory, precepting models, and feedback evaluation tools).
Booknews
Experts in the field of family medicine give advice on educating medical students in the patient-care setting. They define the scope of preceptorship and discuss managing costs, working with medical schools and local hospitals, integrating the student into the practice, problems learners, and teaching styles. Paulman teaches in the department of family medicine at the University of Nebraska Medical Center. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780801863660
Publisher:
Johns Hopkins University Press
Publication date:
04/28/2000
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
232
Product dimensions:
5.00(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.56(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

Meet the Author

Paul M. Paulman, M.D., is a professor in the Department of Family Medicine at the University of Nebraska Medical Center. Jeffrey L. Susman, M.D., is director of the Department of Family Medicine at the University of Cincinnati. Cheryl A. Abboud, M.P.A., is an administrator in the Department of Pathology and Microbiology at the University of Nebraska Medical Center.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >