The Presidency of George Bush

The Presidency of George Bush

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by John Robert Greene, John Robert Green
     
 

ISBN-10: 0700609938

ISBN-13: 9780700609932

Pub. Date: 01/28/2000

Publisher: University Press of Kansas

How could a president have won a war and lost a reelection? For George Bush, being Commander in Chief during Desert Storm was not enough. Domestic issues, personality factors, and the vagaries of the 1992 campaign confined his presidency to a single term. John Robert Greene helps us understand why.

This first comprehensive history of George Bush's administration

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Overview

How could a president have won a war and lost a reelection? For George Bush, being Commander in Chief during Desert Storm was not enough. Domestic issues, personality factors, and the vagaries of the 1992 campaign confined his presidency to a single term. John Robert Greene helps us understand why.

This first comprehensive history of George Bush's administration paints a striking portrait of a "positive moderate" whose accomplishments are often underrated. Greene's is the first book to make use of the entire range of literature on the forty-first president—including the Bush Papers at the George Bush Presidential Library at Texas A&M University—and draws on key interviews with members of his administration and with George Bush himself.

Greene sets Bush's presidency in the context of the Reagan years and reviews not only his foreign policy successes—notably the war with Iraq and an improved relationship with Russia—but also key domestic issues: economic recession, the much maligned "Read My Lips" tax hike, Clarence Thomas's controversial Supreme Court appointment, and the enactment of bills that protected the environment and improved the lives of disabled Americans. Greene also offers an insightful analysis of Bush's bid for reelection, describing a campaign that saw conservatives abandoning Bush in droves while early signs of an economic upturn did little to defuse the Democrats' advantage.

Greene is particularly insightful on Bush the person, depicting the president as a man of patience and prudence who placed great value on loyalty and who was better at managing crises than he was the day-to-day demands of the presidency. He shows us the sense of humor and love of the outdoors in a man often branded an elitist or a wimp, who ultimately was never able to manipulate his public image to his advantage.

The Presidency of George Bush takes into account the many facets of the Bush administration, from the spirited optimism of a thousand points of light to the unsettling vagueness of "the vision thing," and shows us a man whose careful stewardship set the tone for post-Cold War foreign policy. As Greene notes, while Bush had his critics, it was on his watch that the Cold War ended and America reasserted its military might.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780700609932
Publisher:
University Press of Kansas
Publication date:
01/28/2000
Series:
American Presidency Series
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
264
Product dimensions:
6.20(w) x 9.20(h) x 1.00(d)

Table of Contents

Foreword

Acknowledgments

1. The Legacies of Ronald Reagan

2. "One Should Serve His Country"

3. "Jugular Politics"

4. "The Untouchables"

5. "A Limited Agenda"

6. Paying for Reaganomics

7. The Pauza, "Partnership," and Panama

8. DESERT SHIELD

9. DESERT STORM

10. President Bush

11. "The Situation Is About as Bad as It Can Be"

12. "The President Should Have Fired Us All"

13. Patience and Prudence

Notes

Bibliographical Essay

Index

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The Presidency of George Bush 1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
There is a volume for almost every president in this series by the University of Kansas. This one lacks accuracy. Among the many errors, the author misquotes Oliver Stone (Gordon Gekko a source?), uses the wrong date for the anniversary of the inauguration of George Washington, confuses debt and deficit, and makes many representations without source but which are easy to check. This one lacks scholarship. While Elbert Smith, Forrest McDonald, and Robert Ferrell use their allotted spaces (these volumes are mostly less than 200 pages of text each) to present scholarly research on Taylor, Fillmore, Washington, Jefferson, and Coolidge, Mr. Greene quotes Weird Al Yankovic, Doonesbury, L.A. Law, and Maureen Dowd. Unlike Alexander Hamilton, Henry Clay, H.L. Mencken, and Herbert Hoover, these are not sources that will stand the test of time. This one lacks honor and grace. How often must we say ¿wimp?¿ Finally, he must take his shots at Ronald Reagan, and he does it often and without improvement to the book. Herbert S. Parmet¿s `George Bush: The Life of a Lone Star Yankee¿ is cited often. Perhaps that is where a serious person should look rather than here.