Presidential Rhetoric and the Public Agenda: Constructing the War on Drugs

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Overview

The bully pulpit is one of the modern president's most powerful tools—and one of the most elusive to measure. Presidential Rhetoric and the Public Agenda uses the war on drugs as a case study to explore whether and how a president's public statements affect the formation and carrying out of policy in the United States.

When in June 1971 President Richard M. Nixon initiated the modern war on drugs, he did so with rhetorical flourish and force, setting in motion a federal policy that has been largely followed for more than three decades. Using qualitative and quantitative measurements, Andrew B. Whitford and Jeff Yates examine presidential proclamations about battling illicit drug use and their effect on the enforcement of anti-drug laws at the national, state, and local level. They analyze specific pronouncements and the social and political contexts in which they are made; examine the relationship between presidential leadership in the war on drugs and the policy agenda of the Drug Enforcement Administration and the U.S. Attorneys; and assess how closely a president's drug policy is implemented in local jurisdictions.

In evaluating the data, this sophisticated study of presidential leadership shows clearly that with careful consideration of issues and pronouncements a president can effectively harness the bully pulpit to drive policy.

Johns Hopkins University Press

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What People Are Saying

Andrew Rudalevige

Original and important. Presidential Rhetoric and the Public Agenda is a well-conceived contribution to the literature on the rhetorical presidency and bureaucratic action.

Andrew Rudalevige, Dickinson College

Bryan D. Jones

President Nixon announced the war on drugs forty years ago, and New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof recently wrote that 'it appears that drugs have won.' In their careful analysis in this important book, Whitford and Yates demonstrate that the rhetoric of presidents can influence the course of public policy, particularly including implementation. Words matter, even in the supposedly technical aspects of policy implementation, and they do so in a way that frames and, yes, ‘constructs’ the policy itself.

Bryan D. Jones, The University of Texas at Austin

Kevin Quinn

Whitford and Yates make a strong case for the proposition that presidents can, and do, use public rhetoric to affect how policy is implemented by executive agencies. Whereas most previous studies of presidential rhetoric have focused on appeals made to the mass public, they focus on the effects of public speeches on field agents charged with implementing policy. That such an effect might exist is not obvious. Nonetheless, their argument is nuanced and well-crafted and their evidence—both qualitative and quantitative—is compelling. The end result is a thought-provoking study that challenges standard views of executive power. I have no doubt that this book will become required reading for all students of the presidency and the bureaucracy.

Kevin Quinn, Harvard University

Andrew Rudalevige
Original and important. Presidential Rhetoric and the Public Agenda is a well-conceived contribution to the literature on the rhetorical presidency and bureaucratic action.
Bryan D. Jones
President Nixon announced the war on drugs forty years ago, and New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof recently wrote that 'it appears that drugs have won.' In their careful analysis in this important book, Whitford and Yates demonstrate that the rhetoric of presidents can influence the course of public policy, particularly including implementation. Words matter, even in the supposedly technical aspects of policy implementation, and they do so in a way that frames and, yes, ‘constructs’ the policy itself.
Kevin Quinn
Whitford and Yates make a strong case for the proposition that presidents can, and do, use public rhetoric to affect how policy is implemented by executive agencies. Whereas most previous studies of presidential rhetoric have focused on appeals made to the mass public, they focus on the effects of public speeches on field agents charged with implementing policy. That such an effect might exist is not obvious. Nonetheless, their argument is nuanced and well-crafted and their evidence—both qualitative and quantitative—is compelling. The end result is a thought-provoking study that challenges standard views of executive power. I have no doubt that this book will become required reading for all students of the presidency and the bureaucracy.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780801893469
  • Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press
  • Publication date: 9/11/2009
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Pages: 232
  • Product dimensions: 6.10 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

Andrew B. Whitford is a professor of public administration and policy at the University of Georgia's School of Public and International Affairs. Jeff Yates is a professor of political science at Binghamton University and the author of Popular Justice: Presidential Prestige and Executive Success in the Supreme Court.

Johns Hopkins University Press

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Table of Contents

List of Figures and Tables

1 Presidential Leadership and Policy Construction 1

2 Presidential Rhetoric as Policy Leadership 11

3 A Presidential History of the War on Drugs 34

4 The Words of War: Political Rhetoric and the War on Drugs 74

5 Presidential Policy Leadership and Federal Enforcement: The Drug Enforcement Administration 95

6 For the People: The U.S. Attorneys and the Impact of Executive Signals on Prosecutorial Priorities 115

7 Taking It to the States: Testing the Limits of Presidential Influence and State Drug Enforcement 139

8 The Social Construction of Presidential Agenda-Setting 157

Appendix A Variables for Chapter 5 169

Appendix B Variables for Chapter 6 171

Appendix C Variables for Chapter 7 173

Appendix D Estimation Method 175

Notes 177

Bibliography 193

Index 209

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