Presidents FYI by Gary Drevitch, Paperback | Barnes & Noble
Presidents FYI

Presidents FYI

by Gary Drevitch
     
 

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George Washington never lived in the White House. Thomas Jefferson played the violin and spoke six languages. Andrew Jackson hosted a party on his first day as president that got so rowdy, he had to escape through a window.

Learn about these presidents and many more in a book full of facts and photos, stories and history, triumphs, disappointments, and tough

Overview

George Washington never lived in the White House. Thomas Jefferson played the violin and spoke six languages. Andrew Jackson hosted a party on his first day as president that got so rowdy, he had to escape through a window.

Learn about these presidents and many more in a book full of facts and photos, stories and history, triumphs, disappointments, and tough decisions. Find out which president sewed his own suits, which one got stuck in a White House bathtub, and which one was never elected! And see if you can run for president (plus how to get elected if you do).

From George Washington to George W. Bush, presidents have changed the boundaries of the nation and the course of its history. Open Presidents FYI to discover what it takes to lead the United States.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Jennie DeGenaro
The Smithsonian Institution published this 80eighty-page, soft-back book onabout the presidents, commencing with George Washington and ending with George W. Bush. Included are highlights. of their tenures, explaining the ups and downs. Illustrations and photographs are superior. The text, for each president, is interestingly written with much factual data included. Drevitch, author, explains certain historical events where one vote changed outcomes. Significant facts about one party or the other changed the course of history. The political process of elections is described in an understandable manner. The author presents facts about each president's background, educational attainment, and physical attributes. The book contains some of the best presidential photographs and each is shown in a realistic manner. Illustrations of historical significance add interest to the electoral process. Presidential extremes include the tallest, the shortest, and the fattest presidents to serve. Presidential trivia gives fun facts for readers to test their knowledge. "Presidents" is well researched and includes significant facts that occurred during each president's administration. This book is most interesting and is one of the best ways to learn about the presidents and the electoral process. It belongs in every public and school library. Reviewer: Jennie DeGenaro
VOYA - Karen Jensen
This well-organized and concise look at the presidential election process and the presidents themselves is colorful yet brief in its discussion of the office of the president, who can be president, and the election process. It ends with a humorous look at some of the high and low points of the presidency, providing a quick look at presidential trivia. These trivia bits include the tallest and shortest president, the oldest and youngest, and more. In between, there is a brief one-page bio of each of the forty-three presidents. The information presented includes only a few highlights of each presidential term. For example, the section on George W. Bush discusses September 11, the War in Iraq, and the war on terror in one paragraph each. There are occasional Web links given to the Smithsonian Web site, which expands on topics, such as through a link that allows students to see the desk that Jefferson "designed and used to write the Declaration of Independence." This succinct work is best suited for those looking for brief trivia bits, quick ready reference, or full-color pictures to use in school projects. Additional materials will be needed for more complete information, but the book will be a good fit for reluctant readers and trivia seekers. Reviewer: Karen Jensen

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780060899912
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
06/17/2008
Pages:
80
Sales rank:
492,708
Product dimensions:
10.80(w) x 10.88(h) x 0.30(d)
Age Range:
6 - 10 Years

Read an Excerpt

Presidents FYI

Chapter One

What Does the President Do?

Each new president must recite the oath of office, which states:

I do solemnly swear that I will faithfully execute the office of President of the United States, and will to the best of my ability, preserve, protect and defend the Constitution of the United States.

So how exactly does a president do that?

Commander in Chief

The president defends the United States in his or her role as commander in chief of the army, navy, air force, and marines. The president can also order National Guard troops to active duty to help states facing disasters, or to defend the country in war. The president chooses the secretary of defense and top leaders for each branch of the military. During wars, the president helps make military plans; but no president can declare war on another country. Only Congress can do that.

World Leader

The president represents the United States to other countries around the world. The president can meet with other world leaders and make treaties and trade deals, but Congress must approve those agreements.

Checks and Balances

The president cannot run the country alone. There is a system of checks and balances written into the U.S. Constitution to make sure that no one branch of government—not Congress, not the Supreme Court, and not the president—gets too powerful.

Only Congress can make laws, but the president can veto, or reject, new laws. However, Congress can overturn a presidential veto if two-thirds of its members vote to doso. The president also suggests new laws to Congress and can set several kinds of rules and regulations—such as rules for making school lunches healthier or limiting what people can do inside national parks. But those rules and regulations can be rejected by the judges of the Supreme Court. Choosing new Supreme Court justices is another presidential power, although the Senate must also approve those judges.

Presidential Power

Despite these limits, the president is still the most important person in the U.S. government. Presidents can set new directions for the country, inspire citizens to change the way they live, and lead the nation through wars that can cost thousands of lives. Decisions made by the president affect millions of people every day. No job in the world has more responsibility—or pressure.

Presidents FYI. Copyright © by Gary Drevitch. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.

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