Pretending the Bed Is a Raft

Overview

If Nanci Kincaid's trademark talent is for narrative voice, her trademark subject is the mating game. "Full of loving and lovelorn women whose affections run as fast, as deep?sometimes even as muddied?as the Mississippi."?Publishers Weekly, starred; "Eight exquisite examples of great short story writing . . . Kincaid's voice is strong, true, and clear, and there is a solid nugget of truth in each story. Highly recommended."?Library Journal; "The narrative voice in all the stories is sure and strong, bolstered by ...

See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (30) from $1.99   
  • New (2) from $15.00   
  • Used (28) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$15.00
Seller since 2005

Feedback rating:

(22)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
Chapel Hill 1997 Hard Cover First Edition (stated) New in New jacket 8vo-over 7?"-9?" tall. FIRST PRINTING of the First Edition (stated). A fine collection of the author's best ... short stories, exploring courtship, victory, defeat, feminine females and the men they attract, little girls, cheerleaders, a perfect wife, perfect love, mating gamesmanship, women honing their strategies, much more. Hardcover with dust jacket, 241pp. A very nice copy. Read more Show Less

Ships from: Garrison, ND

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$17.95
Seller since 2005

Feedback rating:

(18)

Condition: New
Chapel Hill, NC, U.S.A. 1997 Hard Cover First Edition New in New jacket 12mo-over 6?"-7?" tall. 1st Ed. so stated, 1st Printing, number row 10-1, HB/DJ, brand new, 241 pp. Here ... in her second book of fiction, Nanci Kincaid, author of "Crossing Blood", zeros in on the give-and-take between certain exuberantly feminine females and the helplessly macho males they attract. Why the bed seems like a raft is her singular insight, and what drives these eight irresistible stories. "Nanci Kincaid comes at you all Southern, rough and sturdy as a long piece of hand-cut wood". "Mirabella". Read more Show Less

Ships from: Stonington, IL

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview

If Nanci Kincaid's trademark talent is for narrative voice, her trademark subject is the mating game. "Full of loving and lovelorn women whose affections run as fast, as deep—sometimes even as muddied—as the Mississippi."—Publishers Weekly, starred; "Eight exquisite examples of great short story writing . . . Kincaid's voice is strong, true, and clear, and there is a solid nugget of truth in each story. Highly recommended."—Library Journal; "The narrative voice in all the stories is sure and strong, bolstered by Kincaid's fresh insights and quirky humor."—Booklist; "Entertaining and occasionally dazzling . . . Good, gritty work from a vigorous talent. Kincaid may well blossom into one of the better storytellers around."—Kirkus Reviews.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
The plaintive voices of Southern women infuse novelist Kincaid's (Crossing Blood) fine debut story collection. "Won't Nobody Ever Love You Like Your Daddy Does" features good-looking Norma June, a cosmetics junkie yearning to be "heavily dosed with admiration" by the next-door neighbor who's been flirting with her daughter. In "Pretty Please," a young girl craving attention aches to jump-start her father's cheating heart, while in the powerful title story a plucky young cancer victim works her way through a list of Things to Do Before I Die. A master at revealing personality through dialogue, Kincaid doesn't limit her character studies to women. In "Why Richard Can't," a Thoreau scholar in love with a student ponders his own reluctance to leave his wife: "They had faced the disappointment that comes if a couple is together long enoughand now there was nothing more to fear. He couldn't possibly disappoint Joanna any more than he already had, nor she him, so they were safe with each other." This is one of the few notes of quiet desperation among eight stories full of loving and lovelorn women whose affections run as fast, as deepsometimes even as muddiedas the Mississippi. BOMC and Literary Guild selections; author tour. (Oct.)
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
In the same season as Elwood Reid's If I Don't Six (Forecasts, June 29) comes another fictional expose of the college football scene--this time from a woman's point of view. Kincaid describes, with mixed success, the education of a coach's wife in the deep South, where football is a secular religion. Having twice been married to a university football coach, Kincaid knows just how and often why the pigskin bounces, and it shows in the ease with which she handles her 15 female narrators, who view the game from every side but the gridiron itself. Some come on for just a few pages; others, including Dixie Gibbs (the coach's wife), her mother, her mother's maid, her mother-in-law, her daughter and her friends (wives of other coaches or mothers of players) reappear throughout. This structure impedes the story: Is it about Dixie, about her husband Mac, their marriage, the multiple burdens on the family? It is all about these things, in part, but the parts don't cohere. Kincaid takes on rich material: changing racial attitudes on and off the field (the story begins in 1968); a thinly veiled portrait of Alabama's legendary cpack, Paul "Bear" Bryant; an insider's view of recruiting; the relief when "the girl's father dropped the charges"; pastors who yell, "Hit him like you mean it, boy." But it all makes us long for a strong central intelligence. Even if she spreads her voices too thin, however, Kincaid is a master at re-creating the speech and spirit of ebullient Southern women, and the novel achieves a seductive power in the parallel lives of the coaches' wives, each one a hostage to her husband's career. As her 1997 collection of short stories, Pretending the Bed is a Raft, proved, Kincaid is a fresh, promising voice in the serio-comic good ol' girl school, with lots to say about male- and female-bonding, off-the-field competition and troubled marriages. In her chorus-line rendition of A Doll's House at halftime, she hasn't quite found the shape to show her wit and wisdom to their best advantage. Author tour. (Oct.)
Library Journal
This finely tuned collection of stories features steamy nights and women dressed up in alluring garb who are on the lookout for men who'll make their dreams come true. In folksy Southern dialog, Kincaid's (Crossing Blood, Putnam, 1992) characters reflect on life and love in eight exquisite examples of great short story writing. In "Won't Nobody Love You Like Your Daddy Does," Tammy's awkward foray into adulthood at age 14 comes from pretending that her neighbor is her husband as they slow-dance at the end of her baby-sitting evening. More awkward is her discovery that her "still good-looking mother" visits the same man while Dad is on the road. Kincaid's voice is strong, true and clear, and there is a solid nugget of truth in each story. Highly recommended.Ann H. Fisher, Radford P.L., Va.
Kirkus Reviews
An entertaining and occasionally dazzling first collection from Kincaid, the Florida-born author of the novel Crossing Blood (1992).

With a single exception, these eight stories focus on girls or women who can't make sense out of their relationships with men or with their own addled and demanding emotions. And even that exception, "Why Richard Can't," looks sympathetically at a middle-aged English professor's unwillingness to change or to leave the wife he's comfortable with for the woman student whose mind and body alike excite his interest. Too many of Kincaid's characters, in fact, talk away at us from conditions of frustrating stasis: the girl who can't make her inattentive, straying father notice her (in "Pretty Please"), or the twice-married woman who knows she'll fail again if she takes the lover she's considering (in the smartly titled "Total Recoil"). The good news is that Kincaid's women are expert nonstop talkers, vernacular virtuosi who can make you howl with a deftly placed one-liner ("I don't have anything against boys from reform school"), or sit bolt upright upon hearing a forthright woman's description of the guilt felt by an unfaithful husband ("like his penis was the arrow on a compass and he suddenly remembered it was always supposed to be pointing north"). And two of the stories are flat-out wonderful. "Just Because They've Got Papers Doesn't Mean They Aren't Still Dogs" traces with wry compassion the education in female solidarity and self- knowledge that expands the horizons and strengthens the character of a childless small-town football coach's wife. And the moving title piece portrays, without a shred of sentimentality, the sexual and intellectual awakening of a young wife and mother who learns she's dying of cancer, and scorns to go gently into anybody's good night.

Good, gritty work from a vigorous talent. Kincaid may well blossom into one of the better storytellers around.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781565121775
  • Publisher: Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill
  • Publication date: 1/28/1997
  • Pages: 241
  • Product dimensions: 5.22 (w) x 7.22 (h) x 0.88 (d)

Meet the Author

Nanci Kincaid

Nanci Kincaid is the author of two previous novels, Crossing Blood and Balls, and a collection of short stories, Pretending the Bed Is a Raft. She lives in Hawaii with her husband. They have four grown children.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Snakes 1
This Is Not the Picture Show 19
Won't Nobody Ever Love You Like Your Daddy Does 39
Pretty Please 65
Just Because They've Got Papers Doesn't Mean They Aren't Still Dogs 81
Why Richard Can't 139
Total Recoil 169
Pretending the Bed Is a Raft 189
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)