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Preventing Prenatal Harm: Should the State Intervene? / Edition 1

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Overview

In this volume, Dick Bryan examines the influence of the international economy upon domestic accumulation, describing the process as the expression of the contradiction between the international scope of accumulation and the national scope of its regulation. Developing a theoretical framework for understanding the contradiction within Marxist political economy, he addresses the theory of value on an international scale, as well as theories of global restructuring and crisis. These issues are then applied to those domestic policies - such as monetary policy and balance of payments - that interrelate with the international economy. The author argues that the conventional theories informing these approaches have consistently failed to recognize the contradictions in international accumulation. National economic management has, as a result, reverted to explicit class politics, attempting to solve domestic economic problems by targeting the living standards of labor.

The book contains no figures.

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Editorial Reviews

Elizabeth L. Shangle
This book addresses the difficult and complicated question of whether the state should intervene in prenatal care, a particularly sensitive healthcare situation because there are two patients involved. The author explores the issue of maternal-fetal conflicts and the legal and ethical responsibilities of the state as well as those of society in general. The purpose is to analyze the problem of preventable prenatal harm and to offer arguments for what solutions may be open to the state and to society. An intricate combination of moral, legal, and practical points of view are used to argue the pros and cons of intervention and the scope of that intervention. With the very complete discussion of the legal and ethical issues, this book could be used by students as well as those more versed in these subjects. The book is well organized with an introductory section and a review of the basic issues. Following this are arguments for and against intervention, and then discussion of applying these principles in practical situations. The final chapter suggests that a broader policy of social reform be considered over and above any question of legislative intervention and presents the conclusions of the book. This book is an exhaustive discussion of the arguments for and against state intervention in preventing prenatal harm, and it will be helpful for those who need a detailed overview of the ethical and legal considerations of this subject. The information, however, is somewhat repetitive, and the conclusions seem to present only vague suggestions for solutions to the problems presented. In addition, the lack of the medical viewpoint or any expert contribution regarding the role of themedical system in this important public health question means the book falls short of the goal of considering all aspects of the issue.
From The Critics
Reviewer:Elizabeth L. Shangle, MD(Loyola University Medical Center)
Description:This book addresses the difficult and complicated question of whether the state should intervene in prenatal care, a particularly sensitive healthcare situation because there are two patients involved. The author explores the issue of maternal-fetal conflicts and the legal and ethical responsibilities of the state as well as those of society in general.
Purpose:The purpose is to analyze the problem of preventable prenatal harm and to offer arguments for what solutions may be open to the state and to society. An intricate combination of moral, legal, and practical points of view are used to argue the pros and cons of intervention and the scope of that intervention.
Audience:With the very complete discussion of the legal and ethical issues, this book could be used by students as well as those more versed in these subjects.
Features:The book is well organized with an introductory section and a review of the basic issues. Following this are arguments for and against intervention, and then discussion of applying these principles in practical situations. The final chapter suggests that a broader policy of social reform be considered over and above any question of legislative intervention and presents the conclusions of the book.
Assessment:This book is an exhaustive discussion of the arguments for and against state intervention in preventing prenatal harm, and it will be helpful for those who need a detailed overview of the ethical and legal considerations of this subject. The information, however, is somewhat repetitive, andthe conclusions seem to present only vague suggestions for solutions to the problems presented. In addition, the lack of the medical viewpoint or any expert contribution regarding the role of the medical system in this important public health question means the book falls short of the goal of considering all aspects of the issue.
Booknews
The author provides an overview and brief history of the changing economics of medicine, followed by a discussion of the resulting clinical constraints, "fiscal scarcity," resource use, the obligations and limits of physicians' professional services, and the ethics of medicine's new economics. Morreim argues that recent changes provide an opportunity to reconsider the values underlying the physician-patient relationship as well as providing a chance to refashion the financial structure of medicine. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

3 Stars from Doody
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780792309840
  • Publisher: Springer Netherlands
  • Publication date: 10/12/2007
  • Series: Clinical Medical Ethics Series , #3
  • Edition description: 1991
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 156
  • Product dimensions: 9.00 (w) x 6.00 (h) x 0.50 (d)

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
Notice
1 Overview 1
2 A Bit of History 8
3 Economic Forces, Clinical Constraints 21
4 Fiscal Scarcity: Challenging Fidelity 43
5 The Limits and Obligations of Fidelity: Resource Use 69
6 The Obligations and Limits of Fidelity: Physicians' Professional Services 103
7 The New Medical Ethics of Medicine's New Economics 131
References 155
Index 177
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