Preventive Negotiation: Avoiding Conflict Escalation

Preventive Negotiation: Avoiding Conflict Escalation

by William I. Zartman
     
 

Negotiation lies at the core of preventive diplomacy. This study is unusual in approaching preventive diplomacy by issue areas: it looks at the way in which preventive negotiation has been practiced, notes its characteristics, and then suggests how lessons can be transferred from one area to another, but only when particular conditions warrant such a transfer.

Overview

Negotiation lies at the core of preventive diplomacy. This study is unusual in approaching preventive diplomacy by issue areas: it looks at the way in which preventive negotiation has been practiced, notes its characteristics, and then suggests how lessons can be transferred from one area to another, but only when particular conditions warrant such a transfer. The distinguished contributing authors treat eleven issues: boundary problems, territorial claims, ethnic conflict, divided states, state disintegration, cooperative disputes, trade wars, transboundary environmental disputes, global natural disasters, global security conflicts, and labor disputes. The editor's conclusion draws out general themes about the nature of preventive diplomacy.

Editorial Reviews

International Affairs
This new volume is a valuable addition to the growing literature in this field. Zartman has assembled a strong team, and each of the chapters casts light on the field.
Ethnic Conflict Research Digest
This work makes a valuable conribution to concretising the theory on preventing conflict escalation.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780847698943
Publisher:
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.
Publication date:
09/28/2000
Series:
Carnegie Commission on Preventing Deadly Conflict Series
Pages:
352
Product dimensions:
5.98(w) x 9.32(h) x 0.96(d)

Meet the Author

I. William Zartman is Jacob Blaustein Professor of International Organizations and Conflict Resolution and director of the African studies and conflict management programs at The Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies, The Johns Hopkins University.

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