Price of Honor: Muslim Women Lift the Veil of Silence on the Islamic World [NOOK Book]

Overview

In recent years, the expanding movement of militant Islam has changed the way millions think, behave, dress, and live, but nowhere has its impact been more powerfully felt than in its dramatic, often devastating effect on the lives of women. Award-winning journalist Jan Goodwin traveled through ten Islamic countries and interviewed hundreds of Muslim women, from professionals to peasants, from royalty to rebels.  The result is an unforgettable journey into a world where women are confined, isolated, even ...
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Price of Honor: Muslim Women Lift the Veil of Silence on the Islamic World

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Overview

In recent years, the expanding movement of militant Islam has changed the way millions think, behave, dress, and live, but nowhere has its impact been more powerfully felt than in its dramatic, often devastating effect on the lives of women. Award-winning journalist Jan Goodwin traveled through ten Islamic countries and interviewed hundreds of Muslim women, from professionals to peasants, from royalty to rebels.  The result is an unforgettable journey into a world where women are confined, isolated, even killed for the sake of a "code of honor" created and zealously enforced by men. 



Price of Honor brings to life a world in which women have become pawns in a bitter power game, and gives readers a provocative look inside Muslim society today.



Islamic women, the badges of honor for their men, speak out in a timely and stunning book that takes us into the volatile heart and mystery of Islam. A provocative portrait of a culture that has become crucially entwined with our own.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Journalist Goodwin travels to 10 countries to interview Muslim women who reveal how their oppressive and confining political systems have affected their lives. Aug.
Library Journal
In this astonishing book, the product of four years of living in the Islamic world, journalist Goodwin Caught in the Crossfire , LJ 3/15/82 examines the movement that is aggressively spreading a fundamentalist version of Islam throughout much of the world. Her interviews with Muslim women in ten countries both fascinate and disturb, for their candor reveals the movement's profound and often devastating effects on them. Maintaining that Muslims understand the West far better than Westerners understand Islam, Goodwin warns against the Western ethnocentrism that could jeopardize both security and energy resources. Instead, she urges greater understanding of ``the world's fastest growing religion'' and of its treatment of women, who ``are the wind sock showing which way the wind is blowing in the Islamic world''--or as one interviewee put it, ``the canaries in the mines.'' The work itself enhances this understanding. A necessary purchase.-- Cynthia Widmer, Downingtown, Pa.
Donna Seaman
Goodwin set out to investigate the status of women in 10 Islamic countries after being shocked and appalled at the brutal treatment of a nine-year-old girl she befriended while living in Peshawar, a frontier town on the border of Pakistan and Afghanistan. Her findings are profoundly disturbing and center on the enormous influence of radical Islamic fundamentalists, who have created a system of "gender apartheid" that has turned women into virtual prisoners. After providing deft descriptions of the current atmosphere in each country, she relates shocking stories of restriction, cruelty, abuse, and violence. Most Islamic women now live severely circumscribed lives. They are forbidden to go out without male chaperons and face harsh jail terms, or even death, for such "crimes" as failing to be fully concealed in a chador or other heavy, dark garments. Worse, of course, are the frequent beatings and rapes, many committed by the police. Men can divorce their wives secretly and are free to have several wives, while women are kept cloistered at home, suffering from depression and a host of ailments associated with lack of sunshine and exercise. This tragic state of affairs is all the more maddening given the fact than none of the more flagrant abuses have any basis in the Koran, which teaches respect for women as equal and invaluable partners in Muslim society. Goodwin takes pains to present balanced and well-documented information, making her revelations all the more alarming.
Booknews
Journalist Goodwin interviewed women from all walks of life in Saudi Arabia, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Gaza and the West Bank of Israel, Jordan, Egypt, Afghanistan, Pakistan, and the United Arab Emirates in pursuit of understanding the heavily restricted lives of women under Islam. She shows how the repressive politics that govern women's personal lives are also a barometer to the growth of fundamentalism and the Muslim regimes' willingness to appease extremists. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780698157798
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA)
  • Publication date: 12/31/2002
  • Sold by: Penguin Group
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 368
  • Sales rank: 260,242
  • File size: 2 MB

Meet the Author

Award-winning journalist Jan Goodwin lived in the Middle East for four years, interviewing women under Islamic rule and spending time with freedom fighters in war-torn Afghanistan.  In the fall of 2001, she returned to Afghanistan to document the changes that took place when the Taliban was removed from power. She was the executive editor of Ladies’ Home Journal for ten years and currently writes for The New York Times, the Daily News, Mirabella, New Woman, Cosmopolitan, and other national publications.  She lives in New York City.


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Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
Ch. l Fundamentally Different? 3
Ch. 2 Muslims, the First Feminists 29
Ch. 3 Pakistan: One Step Forward, Two Steps Back 47
Ch. 4 Afghanistan: "When You Can't Beat the Donkey, Beat the Saddle" 73
Ch. 5 Iran: "There Is No Fun in Islam" 99
Ch. 6 United Arab Emirates : The Playground of the Gulf 125
Ch. 7 Kuwait: A War of Independence 148
Ch. 8 Muslim Missionaries, American Converts 174
Ch. 9 Saudi Arabia: The Custodians of the Two Holiest Places 198
Ch. 10 Iraq: A Nation of Fear 224
Ch. 11 Jordan: When Islam Is the Solution 250
Ch. 12 Israeli-Occupied Territories: Next Year in Jerusalem 277
Ch. 13 Egypt: The Mother of the World 308
Ch. 14 Epilogue 338
Index 345
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Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 7, 2003

    I highly recommend this book

    I loved this book, despite the fact that some sections are extremely sad. It's a powerful, riveting read, and extremely well researched. The author engages the reader in way you feel as if you are right there yourself talking to these women. It was obvious that Goodwin was able to develop a great deal of trust and rapport with the women she interviewed. I was also impressed at the variety of people she spoke with in countries that frequently have strict censorship. The book includes interviews with educated elite women to the impoverished illiterate, from conservative to liberal Muslims, and the author didn't just confine herself to the Arab Muslim world, but included non Arab-Muslim countries. Having read the original version of the book, I still found it extremely helpful to go back and read the updated version, which has just come out, especially in light of 9/11, and the recent U.S. wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. Price of Honor raised my awareness and understanding significantly of a part of the world we in the U.S. tend not to know a great deal about. Equally important is the fact that the author is very respectful of Islam. I now understand why their faith is so important to Muslims, and just how integrated it is in their every day life and politics. The book is an astounding tour of a large swathe of the Muslim world; the comparison within and between and among the different countries was fascinating. I highly recommend Price of Honor.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 16, 2009

    recommended for book club

    This book was recommended by my book club, but I was unable to get through half of the book.  Very difficult to stay interested, chapter after chapter of very similar text.  Most of the members of the club were unable to get through the book in time for discussion for similar reasons.  Would not recommend unless you are interested in the Muslum culture.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 16, 2005

    Lethal Combination

    What a disaster to be a women and a Muslim!!! I rather be dead than live like them and be treated worse than animals! Although I feel sorry for them, I think they should stand up for their rights and fight the male-dominated and oppressive traditions.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 4, 2010

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 27, 2008

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