Pride and Prejudice: A Longman Cultural Edition / Edition 1

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Overview

From Longman's Cultural Editions series, Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice , edited by Claudia Johnson and Susan Wolfson, offers the text of the first edition and is extensively annotated in several contexts, from Austen's views, to cultural issues, to first reviews and critical reception.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780321105073
  • Publisher: Longman
  • Publication date: 12/4/2002
  • Series: Longman Cultural Editions Series
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 464
  • Sales rank: 406,844
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.10 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Meet the Author

Jane Austen

Coeditor of the Longman Critical Edition of Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice, Claudia L. Johnson, Murray Professor of English Literature and current chair of the English Department at Princeton University is a specialist in 18th- and early 19th-century literature, with a focus on the novel. In addition to the long 18th century, her courses feature gothic fiction, sentimentalism, the emergence of nationalism, film adaptations of fiction, Samuel Johnson, and Austen. Her critical studies, Jane Austen: Women, Politics, and the Novel (1988), and Equivocal Beings: Politics, Gender and Sentimentality in the 1790s (1995), are internationally acclaimed. She is the editor of The Cambridge Companion to Mary Wollstonecraft (2002), and of several Austen titles (for other presses): Mansfield Park (1998), Sense and Sensibility (2002), Northanger Abbey (2003). Her new book-projects are Jane Austen’s Cults and Cultures, tracing permutations of “Jane mania” from 1817 to the present, and Raising the Novel, which explores the project of elevating novels to keystones of high culture.

Susan J. Wolfson is professor of English at Princeton University. In addition to this present volume, her editorial work includes Felicia Hemans (Princeton UP, 2000) and the Longman Cultural Edition of John Keats. With Claudia Johnson, she is coeditor of the Longman Cultural Edition of Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice. With Peter Manning, she is coeditor of the Romantics volume in The Longman Anthology of British Literature, and Selected Poems of Lord Byron (Penguin, 2005). Her critical books include the prize-winning Formal Charges: The Shaping of Poetry in British Romanticism (Stanford UP, 1997) and Borderlines: The Shiftings of Gender in British Romanticism (Stanford UP, 2007).

Biography

In 1801, George Austen retired from the clergy, and Jane, Cassandra, and their parents took up residence in Bath, a fashionable town Jane liked far less than her native village. Jane seems to have written little during this period. When Mr. Austen died in 1805, the three women, Mrs. Austen and her daughters, moved first to Southampton and then, partly subsidized by Jane's brothers, occupied a house in Chawton, a village not unlike Jane's first home. There she began to work on writing and pursued publishing once more, leading to the anonymous publication of Sense and Sensibility in 1811 and Pride and Prejudice in 1813, to modestly good reviews.

Known for her cheerful, modest, and witty character, Jane Austen had a busy family and social life, but as far as we know very little direct romantic experience. There were early flirtations, a quickly retracted agreement to marry the wealthy brother of a friend, and a rumored short-lived attachment -- while she was traveling -- that has not been verified. Her last years were quiet and devoted to family, friends, and writing her final novels. In 1817 she had to interrupt work on her last and unfinished novel, Sanditon, because she fell ill. She died on July 18, 1817, in Winchester, where she had been taken for medical treatment. After her death, her novels Northanger Abbey and Persuasion were published, together with a biographical notice, due to the efforts of her brother Henry. Austen is buried in Winchester Cathedral.

Author biography courtesy of Barnes & Noble Books.

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    1. Date of Birth:
      December 16, 1775
    2. Place of Birth:
      Village of Steventon in Hampshire, England
    1. Date of Death:
      July 18, 1817
    2. Place of Death:
      Winchester, Hampshire, England
    1. Education:
      Taught at home by her father

Read an Excerpt

Pride and Prejudice

A Longman Cultural Edition
By Jane Austen

Longman Publishing Group

Copyright © 2002 Jane Austen
All right reserved.

ISBN: 0321105079

Volume One

Chapter One

It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune must be in want of a wife.

However little known the feelings or views of such a man may be on his first entering a neighbourhood, this truth is so well fixed in the minds of the surrounding families, that he is considered as the rightful property of some one or other of their daughters.

"My dear Mr. Bennet," said his lady to him one day, "have you heard that Netherfield Park is let at last?"

Mr. Bennet replied that he had not.

"But it is," returned she; "for Mrs. Long has just been here, and she told me all about it."

Mr. Bennet made no answer.

"Do not you want to know who has taken it?" cried his wife impatiently.

"You want to tell me, and I have no objection to hearing it."

This was invitation enough.

"Why, my dear, you must know, Mrs. Long says that Netherfield is taken by a young man of large fortune from the north of England; that he came down on Monday in a chaise and four to see the place, and was so much delighted with it that he agreed with Mr. Morris immediately; that he is to take possession before Michaelmas, and some of his servants are to be in the house by the end ofnext week."

"What is his name?"

"Bingley."

"Is he married or single?"

"Oh! single, my dear, to be sure! A single man of large fortune; four or five thousand a year. What a fine thing for our girls!"

"How so? how can it affect them?"

"My dear Mr. Bennet," replied his wife, "how can you be so tiresome! You must know that I am thinking of his marrying one of them."

"Is that his design in settling here?"

"Design! nonsense, how can you talk so! But it is very likely that he may fall in love with one of them, and therefore you must visit him as soon as hecomes.

"I see no occasion for that. You and the girls may go, or you may send them by themselves, which perhaps will be still better; for, as you are as handsome as any of them, Mr. Bingley might like you the bestof the party."

"My dear, you flatter me. I certainly have had my share of beauty, but I do not pretend to be any thing extraordinary now. When a woman has five grown up daughters, she ought to give over thinking of her own beauty."

"In such cases, a woman has not often much beauty to think of."

"But, my dear, you must indeed go and see Mr. Bingley when he comes into the neighbourhood."

"It is more than I engage for, I assure you."

"But consider your daughters. Only think what an establishment it would be for one of them. Sir William and Lady Lucas are determined to go, merely on that account, for in general, you know they visit no new comers. Indeed you must go, for it will be impossible for us to visit him, if you do not."

"You are over scrupulous, surely. I dare say Mr. Bingley will be very glad to see you; and I will send a few lines by you to assure him of my hearty consent to his marrying which ever he chuses of the girls; though I must throw in a good word for my little Lizzy."

"I desire you will do no such thing. Lizzy is not a bit better than the others; and I am sure she is not half so handsome as Jane, nor half so good humoured as Lydia. But you are always giving her the preference.

"They have none of them much to recommend them , replied he; "they are all silly and ignorant like other girls; but Lizzy has something more of quick-ness than her sisters."

"Mr. Bennet, how can you abuse your own children in such a way? You take delight in vexing me. You have no compassion on my poor nerves."

"You mistake me, my dear. I have a high respect for your nerves. They are my old friends. I have heard you mention them with consideration these twenty years at least."

"Ah! you do not know what I suffer."

"But I hope you will get over it, and live to seemany young men of four thousand a year come intothe neighbourhood."

"It will be no use to us if twenty such should come, since you will not visit them."

"Depend upon it, my dear, that when there are twenty I will visit them all."

Mr. Bennet was so odd a mixture of quick parts, sarcastic humour, reserve, and caprice, that the experience of three and twenty years had been insufficient to make his wife understand his character. Her mind was less difficult to developer She was a woman of mean understanding, little information, and uncertain temper. When she was discontented, she fancied herself nervous. The business of her life was to get her daughters married; its solace was visiting and news.

Continues...


Excerpted from Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen Copyright © 2002 by Jane Austen. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Table of Contents

List of Illustrations.

About Longman Cultural Editions.

About this Edition.

Introduction.

Table of Dates.

Pride and Prejudice (1813).

Volume 1.

Volume 2.

Volume 3.

Jane Austen's Letters.

“To Cassandra Austen,” 2 June 1799.

“To Cassandra Austen,” 20-21 November 1800.

“To Cassandra Austen,” 29 January 1813.

“To Cassandra Austen,” 4 February 1813.

“To Cassandra Austen,” 9 February 1813.

“To Frank Austen,” 3 July 1813.

“To Frank Austen,” 25 September 1813.

“To Anna Austen,” 9 September 1814.

“To James Stanier Clarke,” 11 December 1815.

“To J. Edward Austen,” 16 December 1816.

Contexts.

Money.

Money: From the 1790s to the Regency (1811-1820).

Marriage and the Marriage Market.

Debates in the House of Commons on The Clandestine Marriage Bill.

Jean-Jacques Rousseau, from Emile (1762, 1763).

Revd. James Fordyce, Sermons to Young Women (1766, 1795).

Mary Wollstonecraft, from A Vindication of the Rights of Woman (1792).

Jane Austen, from Emma (1816).

Lord Byron, Don Juan Canto 14. XVIII (1823).

Female Character and Conduct.

Revd. James Fordyce, from Sermons to Young Women (1766, 1777).

Dr. John Gregory, A Father's Legacy to His Daughters (1774).

Mary Wollstonecraft, from A Vindication of the Rights of Woman (1792).

Male Characters and Conduct.

Alexander Pope, from Epistle IV, To Richard Boyl, Earl of Burlington; Of the Uses of Riches (1731).

Samuel Johnson, Rambler (1750).

The Picturesque and Great Houses.

William Gilpin, from Observations, Relative chiefly to Picturesque Beauty, made in the year 1792, on Several Parts of England (1786) and Three Essays: On Picturesque Beauty, On Picturesque Travel, and on Sketching Landscape (1792).

John Byng, Rules for Admission to Strawberry Hill.

Reactions to Pride and Prejudice.

First Reviews and Readers.

British Critic XLI (1813).

Critical Review 4/3 (1813).

Anna Isabella Milbanke (1813).

Walter Scott, Quarterly Review (1815).

The Next Generation.

Henry Crabb Robinson.

Richard Whatley, Quarterly Review (1821).

Walter Scott, Journal, 1826-27.

Maria Jane Jewsbury, The Athenaeum.

Charlotte Bronte, letters.

Further Reading.

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