Pride (Yaoi Manga) - Nook Edition

Pride (Yaoi Manga) - Nook Edition

5.0 1
by Ikue Ishida
     
 
Pride (Yaoi Manga) - Nook Edition
Chiyuki Amamiya works as a public prosecutor at the western branch of the Tokyo district public prosecutor’s office. One day, two men transfer to Amamiya’s office. One of them is Yoshitaka Morooka, the progeny of a long line of merchants. The other is Masachika Katori, the man they used to call the home office prince

Overview

Pride (Yaoi Manga) - Nook Edition
Chiyuki Amamiya works as a public prosecutor at the western branch of the Tokyo district public prosecutor’s office. One day, two men transfer to Amamiya’s office. One of them is Yoshitaka Morooka, the progeny of a long line of merchants. The other is Masachika Katori, the man they used to call the home office prince before he fell from grace!

Amamiya has just broken up with his boyfriend and, starving for some skin-to-skin contact, ends up sleeping with Katori after a night of drinking…

Translated by Anna Haverinen
Edited by Sora
Lettered by Devyn Chen

(Formatted for the Nook E-reader screen size)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940013846982
Publisher:
Digital Manga Publishing
Publication date:
12/14/2011
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Sales rank:
1,009,921
File size:
12 MB
Note:
This product may take a few minutes to download.

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Pride (Yaoi Manga) - Nook Edition 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Epistasthai-review More than 1 year ago
It’s hard to resist a really good love triangle. In fact halfway through this I suddenly realized I was hoping for a threesome. (There isn’t one). But whom to choose? The younger, good-looking man with something to prove? Or the slightly older, handsome cool and detached man with a mysterious past? They say you can’t have your cake and eat it too, but a story like this makes you want to find a way to do so. What a choice to have to make! Amamiya is lonely and hasn’t had a relationship in a while. His previous boyfriend had transferred abroad. Whilst he looks intimidating when he’s interrogating someone, actually he is quite lonely and longs for someone to hold him. When two prosecutors are transferred in, he realizes he is attracted to both of them, for different reasons. And his number one personal rule is No. Workplace. Romance. He’s never broken it. But somehow he manages to break this rule one evening when he gets drunk. Morooka is a few years younger than Amamiya, but he is mature for his age. He’s worked hard to get where he is in the Prosecutor’s Office. He had to give up his dream of entering the legal profession when his father collapsed right after he graduated from university. So he managed the family business for three years and then entered the prosecutor’s office. He loves his work, and he loves Amamiya, having seen him as a young prosecutor when Morooka was struggling to keep his family’s business together. Katori is a few years older than Amamiya, and is an elite in the legal profession. In fact, he’s considered the Prince of the Prosecutor’s office. But some unknown scandal forced him out and now he’s working with Amamiya. What happens when you put three ambitious men together? Perhaps it depends on what they’re ambitious for. One thing I really enjoyed in Pride was the dialogue. Plus, it was nice to have the legal system explained. For instance, judges are constrained by the constitution and the law and are answerable to those only. Prosecutors have to work under a chief prosecutor and the arrangement is a bit more bureaucratic. (I’m not sure how correct these explanations actually are, but they fit quite well into the storyline). The cases these prosecutors work on in the course of this book had me wondering about the outcomes – did that kid get convicted of mugging his boss? What happened with that “first time” shoplifter, the one Amamiya suspected wasn’t as innocent as everyone thought? But these are just sides to the actual goings on. This is not a police procedural or crime drama, so these cases aren’t presented from start to finish. A great deal of character development happens within the confines of a case, however, and that’s one reason Pride is so interesting. I’m giving this one 5 out of 5. It was entertaining, interesting, and made me feel for each of the three characters. I found myself wanting a threesome just so no one would get left out. (No threesome.) I was rooting for each one to get what he wanted. It is easy to make a character the odd one out by giving him a mean personality, or by making him the ‘bad guy’. But Ishida-sensei didn’t take the easy way out. All three of these guys are interesting and sympathetic in different ways, and I found myself rooting for each one. At the end of this volume, I found myself desperate to read the second volume. Aargh! Who’s he gonna choose? Disclosure: I’d like to thank DMG for the loan of a reviewer copy.