Pride & Prejudice (Pulp! The Classics)

Pride & Prejudice (Pulp! The Classics)

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by Jane Austen
     
 

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Lock up your daughters . . . Darcy's in town!
Mrs. Bennett is on a mission to marry off her five daughters to rich men. Enter Mr. Charles Bingley and his rather hot friend, Darcy. Love, loathing, and bittersweet romance follow.  See more details below

Overview

Lock up your daughters . . . Darcy's in town!
Mrs. Bennett is on a mission to marry off her five daughters to rich men. Enter Mr. Charles Bingley and his rather hot friend, Darcy. Love, loathing, and bittersweet romance follow.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781843440727
Publisher:
Oldcastle Books
Publication date:
01/28/2013
Series:
Pulp! The Classics Series
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
352
Sales rank:
446,414
File size:
597 KB

Read an Excerpt

Pride and Prejudice


By Jane Austen

Oldcastle Books

Copyright © 2013 Jane Austen
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-1-84344-072-7


CHAPTER 1

It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife.

However little known the feelings or views of such a man may be on his first entering a neighbourhood, this truth is so well fixed in the minds of the surrounding families, that he is considered the rightful property of some one or other of their daughters.

'My dear Mr Bennet,' said his lady to him one day, 'have you heard that Netherfield Park is let at last?'

Mr Bennet replied that he had not.

'But it is,' returned she; 'for Mrs Long has just been here, and she told me all about it.'

Mr Bennet made no answer.

'Do you not want to know who has taken it?' cried his wife impatiently.

'You want to tell me, and I have no objection to hearing it.'

This was invitation enough.

'Why, my dear, you must know, Mrs Long says that Netherfield is taken by a young man of large fortune from the north of England; that he came down on Monday in a chaise and four to see the place, and was so much delighted with it, that he agreed with Mr Morris immediately; that he is to take possession before Michaelmas, and some of his servants are to be in the house by the end of next week.'

'What is his name?'

'Bingley.'

'Is he married or single?'

'Oh! Single, my dear, to be sure! A single man of large fortune; four or five thousand a year. What a fine thing for our girls!'

'How so? How can it affect them?'

'My dear Mr Bennet,' replied his wife, 'how can you be so tiresome! You must know that I am thinking of his marrying one of them.'

'Is that his design in settling here?'

'Design! Nonsense, how can you talk so! But it is very likely that he may fall in love with one of them, and therefore you must visit him as soon as he comes.'

'I see no occasion for that. You and the girls may go, or you may send them by themselves, which perhaps will be still better, for as you are as handsome as any of them, Mr Bingley may like you the best of the party.'

'My dear, you flatter me. I certainly have had my share of beauty, but I do not pretend to be anything extraordinary now. When a woman has five grown-up daughters, she ought to give over thinking of her own beauty.'

'In such cases, a woman has not often much beauty to think of.'

'But, my dear, you must indeed go and see Mr Bingley when he comes into the neighbourhood.'

'It is more than I engage for, I assure you.'

'But consider your daughters. Only think what an establishment it would be for one of them. Sir William and Lady Lucas are determined to go, merely on that account, for in general, you know, they visit no newcomers. Indeed you must go, for it will be impossible for us to visit him if you do not.'

'You are over-scrupulous, surely. I dare say Mr Bingley will be very glad to see you; and I will send a few lines by you to assure him of my hearty consent to his marrying whichever he chooses of the girls; though I must throw in a good word for my little Lizzy.'

'I desire you will do no such thing. Lizzy is not a bit better than the others; and I am sure she is not half so handsome as Jane, nor half so good-humoured as Lydia. But you are always giving her the preference.'

'They have none of them much to recommend them,' replied he; 'they are all silly and ignorant like other girls; but Lizzy has something more of quickness than her sisters.'

'Mr Bennet, how can you abuse your own children in such a way? You take delight in vexing me. You have no compassion for my poor nerves.'

'You mistake me, my dear. I have a high respect for your nerves. They are my old friends. I have heard you mention them with consideration these last twenty years at least.'

'Ah, you do not know what I suffer.'

'But I hope you will get over it, and live to see many young men of four thousand a year come into the neighbourhood.'

'It will be no use to us, if twenty such should come, since you will not visit them.'

'Depend upon it, my dear, that when there are twenty, I will visit them all.'

Mr Bennet was so odd a mixture of quick parts, sarcastic humour, reserve, and caprice, that the experience of three-and-twenty years had been insufficient to make his wife understand his character. Her mind was less difficult to develop. She was a woman of mean understanding, little information, and uncertain temper. When she was discontented, she fancied herself nervous. The business of her life was to get her daughters married; its solace was visiting and news.

CHAPTER 2

Mr Bennet was among the earliest of those who waited on Mr Bingley. He had always intended to visit him, though to the last always assuring his wife that he should not go; and till the evening after the visit was paid she had no knowledge of it. It was then disclosed in the following manner. Observing his second daughter employed in trimming a hat, he suddenly addressed her with:

'I hope Mr Bingley will like it, Lizzy.'

'We are not in a way to know what Mr Bingley likes,' said her mother resentfully, 'since we are not to visit.'

'But you forget, mamma,' said Elizabeth, 'that we shall meet him at the assemblies, and that Mrs Long promised to introduce him.'

'I do not believe Mrs Long will do any such thing. She has two nieces of her own. She is a selfish, hypocritical woman, and I have no opinion of her.'

'No more have I,' said Mr Bennet; 'and I am glad to find that you do not depend on her serving you.'

Mrs Bennet deigned not to make any reply, but, unable to contain herself, began scolding one of her daughters.

'Don't keep coughing so, Kitty, for Heaven's sake! Have a little compassion on my nerves. You tear them to pieces.'

'Kitty has no discretion in her coughs,' said her father; 'she times them ill.'

'I do not cough for my own amusement,' replied Kitty fretfully. 'When is your next ball to be, Lizzy?'

'To-morrow fortnight.'

'Aye, so it is,' cried her mother, 'and Mrs Long does not come back till the day before; so it will be impossible for her to introduce him, for she will not know him herself.'

'Then, my dear, you may have the advantage of your friend, and introduce Mr Bingley to her.'

'Impossible, Mr Bennet, impossible, when I am not acquainted with him myself; how can you be so teasing?'

'I honour your circumspection. A fortnight's acquaintance is certainly very little. One cannot know what a man really is by the end of a fortnight. But if we do not venture somebody else will; and after all, Mrs Long and her daughters must stand their chance; and, therefore, as she will think it an act of kindness, if you decline the office, I will take it on myself.'

The girls stared at their father. Mrs Bennet said only, 'Nonsense, nonsense!'

'What can be the meaning of that emphatic exclamation?' cried he. 'Do you consider the forms of introduction, and the stress that is laid on them, as nonsense? I cannot quite agree with you there. What say you, Mary? For you are a young lady of deep reflection, I know, and read great books and make extracts.'

Mary wished to say something sensible, but knew not how.

'While Mary is adjusting her ideas,' he continued, 'let us return to Mr Bingley.'

'I am sick of Mr Bingley,' cried his wife.

'I am sorry to hear that; but why did not you tell me that before? If I had known as much this morning I certainly would not have called on him. It is very unlucky; but as I have actually paid the visit, we cannot escape the acquaintance now.'

The astonishment of the ladies was just what he wished; that of Mrs Bennet perhaps surpassing the rest; though, when the first tumult of joy was over, she began to declare that it was what she had expected all the while.

'How good it was in you, my dear Mr Bennet! But I knew I should persuade you at last. I was sure you loved your girls too well to neglect such an acquaintance. Well, how pleased I am! and it is such a good joke, too, that you should have gone this morning and never said a word about it till now.'

'Now, Kitty, you may cough as much as you choose,' said Mr Bennet; and, as he spoke, he left the room, fatigued with the raptures of his wife.

'What an excellent father you have, girls!' said she, when the door was shut. 'I do not know how you will ever make him amends for his kindness; or me, either, for that matter. At our time of life it is not so pleasant, I can tell you, to be making new acquaintances every day; but for your sakes, we would do anything. Lydia, my love, though you are the youngest, I dare say Mr Bingley will dance with you at the next ball.'

'Oh!' said Lydia stoutly, 'I am not afraid; for though I am the youngest, I'm the tallest.'

The rest of the evening was spent in conjecturing how soon he would return Mr Bennet's visit, and determining when they should ask him to dinner.

CHAPTER 3

Not all that Mrs Bennet, however, with the assistance of her five daughters, could ask on the subject, was sufficient to draw from her husband any satisfactory description of Mr Bingley. They attacked him in various ways – with barefaced questions, ingenious suppositions, and distant surmises; but he eluded the skill of them all, and they were at last obliged to accept the second-hand intelligence of their neighbour, Lady Lucas. Her report was highly favourable. Sir William had been delighted with him. He was quite young, wonderfully handsome, extremely agreeable, and, to crown the whole, he meant to be at the next assembly with a large party. Nothing could be more delightful! To be fond of dancing was a certain step towards falling in love; and very lively hopes of Mr Bingley's heart were entertained.

'If I can but see one of my daughters happily settled at Netherfield,' said Mrs Bennet to her husband, 'and all the others equally well married, I shall have nothing to wish for.'

In a few days Mr Bingley returned Mr Bennet's visit, and sat about ten minutes with him in his library. He had entertained hopes of being admitted to a sight of the young ladies, of whose beauty he had heard much; but he saw only the father. The ladies were somewhat more fortunate, for they had the advantage of ascertaining from an upper window that he wore a blue coat, and rode a black horse.

An invitation to dinner was soon afterwards dispatched; and already had Mrs Bennet planned the courses that were to do credit to her housekeeping, when an answer arrived which deferred it all. Mr Bingley was obliged to be in town the following day, and, consequently, unable to accept the honour of their invitation, etc. Mrs Bennet was quite disconcerted. She could not imagine what business he could have in town so soon after his arrival in Hertfordshire; and she began to fear that he might be always flying about from one place to another, and never settled at Netherfield as he ought to be. Lady Lucas quieted her fears a little by starting the idea of his being gone to London only to get a large party for the ball; and a report soon followed that Mr Bingley was to bring twelve ladies and seven gentlemen with him to the assembly. The girls grieved over such a number of ladies, but were comforted the day before the ball by hearing, that instead of twelve he brought only six with him from London – his five sisters and a cousin. And when the party entered the assembly room it consisted of only five altogether – Mr Bingley, his two sisters, the husband of the eldest, and another young man.

Mr Bingley was good-looking and gentlemanlike; he had a pleasant countenance, and easy, unaffected manners. His sisters were fine women, with an air of decided fashion. His brother-in-law, Mr Hurst, merely looked the gentleman; but his friend Mr Darcy soon drew the attention of the room by his fine, tall person, handsome features, noble mien, and the report which was in general circulation within five minutes after his entrance, of his having ten thousand a year. The gentlemen pronounced him to be a fine figure of a man, the ladies declared he was much handsomer than Mr Bingley, and he was looked at with great admiration for about half the evening, till his manners gave a disgust which turned the tide of his popularity; for he was discovered to be proud; to be above his company, and above being pleased; and not all his large estate in Derbyshire could then save him from having a most forbidding, disagreeable countenance, and being unworthy to be compared with his friend.

Mr Bingley had soon made himself acquainted with all the principal people in the room; he was lively and unreserved, danced every dance, was angry that the ball closed so early, and talked of giving one himself at Netherfield. Such amiable qualities must speak for themselves. What a contrast between him and his friend! Mr Darcy danced only once with Mrs Hurst and once with Miss Bingley, declined being introduced to any other lady, and spent the rest of the evening in walking about the room, speaking occasionally to one of his own party. His character was decided. He was the proudest, most disagreeable man in the world, and everybody hoped that he would never come there again. Amongst the most violent against him was Mrs Bennet, whose dislike of his general behaviour was sharpened into particular resentment by his having slighted one of her daughters.

Elizabeth Bennet had been obliged, by the scarcity of gentlemen, to sit down for two dances; and during part of that time, Mr Darcy had been standing near enough for her to hear a conversation between him and Mr Bingley, who came from the dance for a few minutes, to press his friend to join it.

'Come, Darcy,' said he, 'I must have you dance. I hate to see you standing about by yourself in this stupid manner. You had much better dance.'

'I certainly shall not. You know how I detest it, unless I am particularly acquainted with my partner. At such an assembly as this it would be insupportable. Your sisters are engaged, and there is not another woman in the room whom it would not be a punishment to me to stand up with.'

'I would not be so fastidious as you are,' cried Mr Bingley, 'for a kingdom! Upon my honour, I never met with so many pleasant girls in my life as I have this evening; and there are several of them you see uncommonly pretty.'

'You are dancing with the only handsome girl in the room,' said Mr Darcy, looking at the eldest Miss Bennet.

'Oh! She is the most beautiful creature I ever beheld! But there is one of her sisters sitting down just behind you, who is very pretty, and I dare say very agreeable. Do let me ask my partner to introduce you.'

'Which do you mean?' and turning round he looked for a moment at Elizabeth, till catching her eye, he withdrew his own and coldly said: 'She is tolerable, but not handsome enough to tempt me; I am in no humour at present to give consequence to young ladies who are slighted by other men. You had better return to your partner and enjoy her smiles, for you are wasting your time with me.'

Mr Bingley followed his advice. Mr Darcy walked off; and Elizabeth remained with no very cordial feelings toward him. She told the story, however, with great spirit among her friends; for she had a lively, playful disposition, which delighted in anything ridiculous.

The evening altogether passed off pleasantly to the whole family. Mrs Bennet had seen her eldest daughter much admired by the Netherfield party. Mr Bingley had danced with her twice, and she had been distinguished by his sisters. Jane was as much gratified by this as her mother could be, though in a quieter way. Elizabeth felt Jane's pleasure. Mary had heard herself mentioned to Miss Bingley as the most accomplished girl in the neighbourhood; and Catherine and Lydia had been fortunate enough never to be without partners, which was all that they had yet learnt to care for at a ball. They returned, therefore, in good spirits to Longbourn, the village where they lived, and of which they were the principal inhabitants. They found Mr Bennet still up. With a book he was regardless of time; and on the present occasion he had a good deal of curiosity as to the event of an evening which had raised such splendid expectations. He had rather hoped that his wife's views on the stranger would be disappointed; but he soon found out that he had a different story to hear.


(Continues...)

Excerpted from Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen. Copyright © 2013 Jane Austen. Excerpted by permission of Oldcastle Books.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Meet the Author

Jane Austen (1775-1817) began writing Pride and Prejudice when she was 22 years old. She is also the author of Emma and Sense and Sensibility.

Brief Biography

Date of Birth:
December 16, 1775
Date of Death:
July 18, 1817
Place of Birth:
Village of Steventon in Hampshire, England
Place of Death:
Winchester, Hampshire, England
Education:
Taught at home by her father

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Pride & Prejudice 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 26 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Highly Recomended! The best piece of British literature ever written!! Modern romantic comedies are based on this book. Every young girl or woman should read this book!! It wouldn't hurt for guys to read it too and take a few lessons from Mr. Darcy!!!:-)
Raya_nashef More than 1 year ago
 For decades, it has been one of the most cherished teen novels, full of intriguing relationships, romance, and suspense. A masterpiece of romance, this novel has gone done in history as one of the most well-known and beloved classics. In her widely renown tale, Austen takes the readers on a journey in which the characters discover different sides to themselves that had been lying dormant within them.  Austen writes her most famous piece in the early decades of the 19th century, an era in which realism and breaking away from traditional, mainstream thought was in favor. The novel itself is centered around the error in society’s norms, focusing primarily on those involved in choosing a marital life companion. Even the opening line is committed directly to stating, “ It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife.”. Pride and Prejudice is not a typical love at first sight kind of novel. In fact Elizabeth Bennet and Fitzwilliam Darcy, the primary interest of the novel, cannot even find it within themselves to endure a single dance together. Instead, the novel provides the reader with the opportunity to watch the characters grow and mature in the course of merely a handful of chapters. Austen successfully creates an entire storyline filled with wit, humor, and romance in which characters are provided with the opportunity to grow and mature. Mr. Darcy, for example, turns from being a seeming proud and arrogant man to being a passionate, gentle, giving, and loving man who devotes himself to try and get in the good graces of Elizabeth Bennet, the woman he has so desperately fallen in love with. The purpose of the novel was to single out the flaws in the way society seems to work. All eligible men and women are seeking to marry for various purposes such as for love, for money, for security (in terms of having someone who can provide a safe life with a roof over their heads and food to eat), etc. Austen classifies each of these relationships within her novel and provides more insight into the way courtships blossomed hundreds of years ago.  In her novel, Austen is successfully able to point out that we as humans have a fatal flaw in that we tend to judge and classify too quickly rather than making a safe assumption after really getting to know one another. Austen take on a huge risk in portraying these flaws within the characters of her story because women of that time period were far more soft spoken than they are now. Throughout the pages of her writings, Austen is able to successfully convey the result of judging one too quickly; Mr. Darcy disapproves of Jane, thinking that she shows no interest in Mr. Bingley, who quickly falls head of heels for her. However, as it is later discovered, Jane was far too unwilling to let her feelings be known to someone so close as her sister, Elizabeth. Austen is able to create a classic literary masterpiece that has withstood the test of time with ever prevalent themes of love, pride and prejudice. 
Nisa_Ilsin More than 1 year ago
Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen has been one of the most magnificent classics ever written for decades, and it still continues to be so today.  Since the book’s publishing in 1813, this novel has stirred up the hearts of men and women everywhere with its stories of love, backstabbing, and its deep insight into the relations of people.  The main character of this story is Elizabeth Bennet, a witty young woman who lives alongside her sisters Jane, Kitty, Lydia, and Mary, and their father and mother.  One of the best parts of this book is the effortless, elegant writing style Austen carries throughout the book, using detailed descriptions. This language greatly complements the personalities of the characters by letting the reader have more insight in how the characters act and think. The plot itself is a wonderful masterpiece. By slowly revealing the intentions and emotions of the characters, Austen was able to achieve a realistic progression of events. For example, Austen did not immediately clarify Mr. Darcy’s feelings about Elizabeth, and by taking valuable time to do so Austen created many more logical events that accompanied the romance in Lizzy’s life. The author also makes family and relationships amongst others a great part of this novel, adding depth to every person. Austen not only expands on the main character, but also gives every character in depth thoughts and personalities.  I would greatly recommend this book to all looking to catch up on the best classics and to find insight on people and life.  This book would appeal to all ages that can understand the language of the time period. With its wonderful plot, detailed characters, and its ability to transport you to the time, Pride and Prejudice is the book to read, and it will stay that way for decades to come. 
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Perhaps one of Jane Austen’s most popular and most read novels is Pride and Prejudice.  For decades, it has been one of the most cherished teen novels, full of intriguing relationships, romance, and suspense. A masterpiece of romance, this novel has gone done in history as one of the most well-known and beloved classics. In her widely renown tale, Austen takes the readers on a journey in which the characters discover different sides to themselves that had been lying dormant within them.  Austen writes her most famous piece in the early decades of the 19th century, an era in which realism and breaking away from traditional, mainstream thought was in favor. The novel itself is centered around the error in society’s norms, focusing primarily on those involved in choosing a marital life companion. Even the opening line is committed directly to stating, “ It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife.”. Pride and Prejudice is not a typical love at first sight kind of novel. In fact Elizabeth Bennet and Fitzwilliam Darcy, the primary interest of the novel, cannot even find it within themselves to endure a single dance together. Instead, the novel provides the reader with the opportunity to watch the characters grow and mature in the course of merely a handful of chapters. Austen successfully creates an entire storyline filled with wit, humor, and romance in which characters are provided with the opportunity to grow and mature. Mr. Darcy, for example, turns from being a seeming proud and arrogant man to being a passionate, gentle, giving, and loving man who devotes himself to try and get in the good graces of Elizabeth Bennet, the woman he has so desperately fallen in love with. The purpose of the novel was to single out the flaws in the way society seems to work. All eligible men and women are seeking to marry for various purposes such as for love, for money, for security (in terms of having someone who can provide a safe life with a roof over their heads and food to eat), etc. Austen classifies each of these relationships within her novel and provides more insight into the way courtships blossomed hundreds of years ago.  In her novel, Austen is successfully able to point out that we as humans have a fatal flaw in that we tend to judge and classify too quickly rather than making a safe assumption after really getting to know one another. Austen take on a huge risk in portraying these flaws within the characters of her story because women of that time period were far more soft spoken than they are now. Throughout the pages of her writings, Austen is able to successfully convey the result of judging one too quickly; Mr. Darcy disapproves of Jane, thinking that she shows no interest in Mr. Bingley, who quickly falls head of heels for her. However, as it is later discovered, Jane was far too unwilling to let her feelings be known to someone so close as her sister, Elizabeth. Austen is able to create a classic literary masterpiece that has withstood the test of time with ever prevalent themes of love, pride and prejudice. 
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Is this a good book?
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