The Prime Minister

The Prime Minister

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by Anthony Trollope
     
 

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Part Two Of Two Parts

When the Duke of Omnium consents to lead a coalition government, the Duchess gets a powerful new social presence. She works hard, if obviously, to consolidate his support. But they both fall under the pernicious influence of the mysterious Ferdinand Lopez.

THE PRIME MINISTER, which Tolstoy described as a "beautiful book," is the fifth of the

Overview

Part Two Of Two Parts

When the Duke of Omnium consents to lead a coalition government, the Duchess gets a powerful new social presence. She works hard, if obviously, to consolidate his support. But they both fall under the pernicious influence of the mysterious Ferdinand Lopez.

THE PRIME MINISTER, which Tolstoy described as a "beautiful book," is the fifth of the six Palliser novels.

"Like eating Victorian life, not just reading it." (B-O-T Editorial Review Board)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780140433494
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
04/28/1996
Series:
Penguin Classics Series
Edition description:
Reissue
Pages:
736
Sales rank:
479,601
Product dimensions:
5.11(w) x 7.80(h) x 1.36(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

Meet the Author

Nicholas Shrimpton is Emeritus Fellow of Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford University.

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The Prime Minister. [A novel.] 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Corner_of_the_Library More than 1 year ago
Trollope is a master at getting the reader to care about his characters from the very first page of the novel, and he does that in The Prime Minister by introducing us to Emily Wharton, who has fallen in love with Ferdinand Lopez. Emily's father is a widower and has not a clue about how to parent his daughter. He has left much of her upbringing to his wife's sister, Mrs. Roby, who is half in love with Lopez herself. In fact, this plot line in the book reminds me very much of Washington Square by Henry James (first published in 1880, some four years after The Prime Minister). Mr. Wharton's stated objections to Lopez as a son-in-law are that he is not an Englishman (his father was Portuguese); and no one knows anything about his background. Mr. Wharton intuitively distrusts Lopez and is greatly distressed by Emily's obvious feelings for Lopez. Mr. Wharton even considers closing his law practice in London in order to take Emily abroad in an effort to break the hold Lopez seems to have on Emily. Unlike Dr. Sloper in Washington Square, Mr. Wharton esteems his daughter and considers letting her marry Lopez. The reader, privy to some insight into Lopez's motives, hopes Mr. Wharton holds out and prevents the marriage.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
I'd never read Trollope.

After I read this novel, I promptly purchased the series of which it is a part. This series, referred to collectively as the Pillaser novels, comprises six fictional works about Victorian politics.

It's possible that the characters in The Prime Minister were more believable to Victorian audiences than they are to us. And the class snobbery of some of the characters occasionally grates on the democratic sensibility of the modern reader.

Still, as the introduction to one of the novels indicates, the characters, situations, and debates that animate these narratives spark that pleasant sensation Henry James called the 'surprise of recognition.'

An example to underscore the point. Among the characters in this populous fiction is Quintus Slide (what a name), editor of The People's Banner, a conservative daily. Slide is a vicious muckraker who, with each new scandalous broadside against the prime minister, congratulates himself on his public-spiritedness and his disinterested commitment to truth, a truth that is usually without context.

Also memorable, even months after reading it, is Plantagenet's (i.e., the prime minister of the title) reflections on how it is that we come to be liberal or conservative.

Read the book. You'll never be bored.