The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie: A Novel [NOOK Book]

Overview



Muriel Spark’s timeless classic about a controversial teacher who deeply marks the lives of a select group of students in the years leading up to World War II
 

“Give me a girl at an impressionable age, and she is mine for life!” So asserts Jean Brodie, a magnetic, dubious, and sometimes comic teacher at the conservative Marcia Blaine School for Girls in Edinburgh. Brodie selects six favorite pupils to...
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The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie: A Novel

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Overview



Muriel Spark’s timeless classic about a controversial teacher who deeply marks the lives of a select group of students in the years leading up to World War II
 

“Give me a girl at an impressionable age, and she is mine for life!” So asserts Jean Brodie, a magnetic, dubious, and sometimes comic teacher at the conservative Marcia Blaine School for Girls in Edinburgh. Brodie selects six favorite pupils to mold—and she doesn’t stop with just their intellectual lives. She has a plan for them all, including how they will live, whom they will love, and what sacrifices they will make to uphold her ideals. When the girls reach adulthood and begin to find their own destinies, Jean Brodie’s indelible imprint is a gift to some, and a curse to others.
 
The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie is Spark’s masterpiece, a novel that offers one of twentieth-century English literature’s most iconic and complex characters—a woman at once admirable and sinister, benevolent and conniving.
 
This ebook features an illustrated biography of Muriel Spark including rare photos and never-before-seen documents from the author’s archive at the National Library of Scotland.
 
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781453245033
  • Publisher: Open Road Media
  • Publication date: 3/20/2012
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 140
  • Sales rank: 99,719
  • File size: 2 MB

Meet the Author



Muriel Spark (1918–2006) was a prolific Scottish novelist, short story writer, and poet whose darkly comedic voice made her one of the most distinctive writers of the twentieth century. Spark grew up in Edinburgh and worked as a department store secretary, writer for trade magazines, and literary editor before publishing her first novel in 1957. The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie (1961), considered her masterpiece, was made into a stage play, a TV series, and a film. Spark became a Dame of the British Empire in 1993.     
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 16 )
Rating Distribution

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(12)

4 Star

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Sort by: Showing 1 – 15 of 16 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 4, 2009

    Great Book.

    I read this book all in one day while I was laying out on the lake. I made my friends read it, and they all loved it too. Some joked that I reminded them of Miss Jean Brodie!

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 6, 2003

    Civilization in the balance

    A useful approach to analyzing The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie (by Muriel Sparks) is to examine the school as a microcosm of civilization (much as William Golding intended his little island to be examined in Lord of the Flies), in this case a civilization with a particularly English culture. It has adult teachers who champion various views and children who must live under the effects those views create when put into practice. The school has a traditional order which Miss Jean Brodie, a fascist and then national socialist sympathizer, seeks to overturn by varying from the curriculum and structure of the school as it developed over time. Brodie is very intelligent and very careful to cultivate an appreciation for 'the true, the good, and the beautiful' in her students initially. However, rather than follow the traditional order and curriculum established within the school, she begins to teach off-subject and off-location, then forms a select group from her students which she distinguishes from her other students and attempts to indoctrinate this special group with her views. Indeed, Brodie attempts to cultivate this special group in a manner akin to the ¿Aryan¿ supermen championed by Hitler. The group even contains a scapegoat member who Sparks carefully identifies as non-Jewish. Rather, Mary MacGregor is an Irish-Catholic (a group long suffering under the conquering English). By being non-Jewish, Sparks illustrates that scapegoats need not always be Jewish (the 'scapegoat' can take different forms) and that England has its own history of ill-treatment towards those of non-Anglican, non-English origin. The story's scapegoat, Mary, is always kept as a part of the group and always treated as the least of the group ¿ she is frequently belittled and insulted - so as to enable feelings of superiority among other members of the group; who in turn are each very careful not to become too friendly with Mary. This process also carefully illustrates to the group that a failure to please Miss Brodie by agreeing with the ideology she espouses will subject them to a similar fate. Moreover, Sparks, a Catholic herself, wishes to illustrate that Catholicism may have harnessed Jean Brodie¿s formidable intellect and imagination for good rather than the more sinister outcome that arises as the book carries forward. As a fascist who becomes an even more extreme national socialist as the story goes on, Brodie is a pseudo-Nietzschean in the sense that she clearly agrees with (but also twists) Nietzsche¿s argument for a new implementation of ¿noble virtue¿ as against the ¿slave morality¿ represented by Christianity and other forms of religion that require recognition of traditions, obedience to ¿commands of God,¿ especially those commands that require a person to show care or concern for ¿lesser¿ people. To Nietzsche, those who can must become commanders and law-givers. Society must never exist for its own sake, but only as ¿a foundation and scaffolding by means of which a select class of beings may be able to elevate themselves to their higher duties [which is to say] to a higher existence.¿ (Beyond Good and Evil). National socialists turned to this argument and developed the idea of a super-race. This super-race is to replace God and become the law-giver and commander of all the other supposedly 'lesser' races. Although Brodie only gradually reveals this as the basis of her thought, her creation of a special class of students early on combined with the belittling of other hints at where she intends to lead her group. Ultimately, like the Lord of the Flies, this book presents a question of how a civilization might survive when barbarianism arises within the ranks. In this case, it is the barbarianism of a totalitarian ideology and it matters not whether that ideology is ultimately fascism, communism, socialism, national socialism, or perhaps in some respects, capitalism. Such ideologies, which create a simplified view of the

    2 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 30, 2000

    One of Sparks' best!!

    Sparks is a consumate writer and her descriptions of this English Teacher's life and that of her pupil's will touch your heart. She has truly captured English eccentricities that carry the novel into your memory. A must have for any Anglophile.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 22, 2013

    Kids go away

    Children, take your stuoid game somewhere ekse and play. This is a book review site for adults to disuss books. Go to facebook, myspace, a blog or the sand box but get off here.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 18, 2013

    The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie

    I finished the book. I didn't care for the book that much. My book club is reading it. I probably would not have read this book otherwise. I didn't care for the characters in the book. Reminded me too much of my high school days and the cliques that form with young school aged girls. It was even more disturbing that a teacher was part of the problem. I like the idea of being independent and a critical thinker, but not at the expense of others.

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  • Posted November 2, 2012

    highly recommended

    good read enjoyed this book even rented the movie ..

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 30, 2012

    Dk

    There. Dk

    0 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 30, 2012

    Rp

    Hole result one.

    0 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 5, 2012

    Ashstar

    *padded into the forest*

    0 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 4, 2012

    To the clans,pelts, and stars

    I've been wondering why you all do this. And what exactly do you do

    0 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 3, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 29, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted September 28, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 12, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted September 25, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing 1 – 15 of 16 Customer Reviews

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