Prince Caspian (Chronicles of Narnia Series #4)

( 295 )

Overview

A mass-market paperback edition of Prince Caspian, book four in the classic fantasy series, The Chronicles of Narnia, featuring cover art by Cliff Nielsen and black-and-white interior illustrations by the original illustrator of Narnia, Pauline Baynes.

The Pevensie siblings travel back to Narnia to help a prince denied his rightful throne as he gathers an army in a desperate attempt to rid his land of a false king. But in the end, it is a ...

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Prince Caspian: The Return to Narnia

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Overview

A mass-market paperback edition of Prince Caspian, book four in the classic fantasy series, The Chronicles of Narnia, featuring cover art by Cliff Nielsen and black-and-white interior illustrations by the original illustrator of Narnia, Pauline Baynes.

The Pevensie siblings travel back to Narnia to help a prince denied his rightful throne as he gathers an army in a desperate attempt to rid his land of a false king. But in the end, it is a battle of honor between two men alone that will decide the fate of an entire world.

Prince Caspian is the fourth book in C. S. Lewis's classic fantasy series, which has been drawing readers of all ages into a magical land where animals talk and trees walk for over sixty years. This is a stand-alone novel, but if you would like to read more of Lucy and Edmund's adventures, pick up The Voyage of the Dawn Treader, the fifth book in The Chronicles of Narnia.

First published in 1951, Prince Caspian was the second book set in the world of Narnia. Within the chronology of the series, it is the fourth book, falling between The Horse and His Boy & The voyage of the Dawn Treader.

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
First published in 1951, Prince Caspian was the second book set in the world of Narnia. Within the chronology of the series, it is the fourth book, falling between The Horse and His Boy & The Voyage of the Dawn Treader.
School Library Journal
Gr 4-8-Peter, Susan, Edmund, and Lucy Pevensey, the heroes and heroines from The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe, return in this fourth installment of C.S. Lewis' Chronicles of Narnia series. The four children are transported from an English train station to an island in the world of Narnia. Though Narnia has been at peace since the children left, it is now under the control of Wicked King Mirax. The youngsters, along with Aslan the great lion, must help young Prince Caspian restore Narnia's glorious past. This full-cast dramatization adheres closely to the book's text. Actor Paul Scofield is the "storyteller," and other British actors read the character parts. The production features sound effects and background music, and is a more complete version of the story than the BBC audio production (Bantam Doubleday, 1998). Children familiar with the series will enjoy this impressive production.-Shauna Yusko, King County Library System, Bellevue, WA Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
From The Critics
These are all BBC enrichments of Lewis' fantasy, abridged in audio form and presenting the highlights of his popular Narnia adventures. Lion, Witch & Wardrobe (0553476564, $18.00), Prince Caspian (479172, $16.99), Voyage Of The Dawn Treader (52495X, $18.00), Silver Chair (525700, $18.00), Horse And His Boy (478842, $18.00), Magician's Nephew (477684, $18.00) and Last Battle (525506, $16.99) each come alive under the BBC's multifaceted presentation, dramatizing the stories and promising to reach all ages with exciting audio stories. J.R.R. Tolkien's Hobbit (0807288837, $25.95) also benefits from BBC's multicast production approach, and does an excellent job of adding drama, including featuring an original score written for Renaissanceera instruments. Mary Pope Osborne reads her own Magic Tree House Collection Books 14 (61645, $18.00), which presents lively stories of time travel, treasure, and magic. All are fine leisure choices for kids of all ages and many an adult.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780064471053
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 7/28/1994
  • Series: Chronicles of Narnia Series , #4
  • Edition description: Reissue
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 256
  • Sales rank: 80,410
  • Age range: 8 - 12 Years
  • Lexile: 870L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 4.10 (w) x 6.70 (h) x 0.70 (d)

Meet the Author

Clive Staples Lewis (1898-1963) was one of the intellectual giants of the twentieth century and arguably one of the most influential writers of his day. He was a Fellow and Tutor in English Literature at Oxford University until 1954, when he was unanimously elected to the Chair of Medieval and Renaissance Literature at Cambridge University, a position he held until his retirement. He wrote more than thirty books, allowing him to reach a vast audience, and his works continue to attract thousands of new readers every year. His most distinguished and popular accomplishments include Mere Christianity, Out of the Silent Planet, The Great Divorce, The Screwtape Letters, and the universally acknowledged classics The Chronicles of Narnia. To date, the Narnia books have sold over 100 million copies and been transformed into three major motion pictures.

Clive Staples Lewis (1898-1963) fue uno de los intelectuales más importantes del siglo veinte y podría decirse que fue el escritor cristiano más influyente de su tiempo. Fue profesor particular de literatura inglesa y miembro de la junta de gobierno en la Universidad Oxford hasta 1954, cuando fue nombrado profesor de literatura medieval y renacentista en la Universidad Cambridge, cargo que desempeñó hasta que se jubiló. Sus contribuciones a la crítica literaria, literatura infantil, literatura fantástica y teología popular le trajeron fama y aclamación a nivel internacional. C. S. Lewis escribió más de treinta libros, lo cual le permitió alcanzar una enorme audiencia, y sus obras aún atraen a miles de nuevos lectores cada año. Sus más distinguidas y populares obras incluyen Las Crónicas de Narnia, Los Cuatro Amores, Cartas del Diablo a Su Sobrino y Mero Cristianismo.

Pauline Baynes has produced hundreds of wonderful illustrations for the seven books in The Chronicles of Narnia. In 1968 she was awarded the prestigious Kate Greenaway Medal for her outstanding contribution to children's literature.

Biography

C. S. Lewis was famous both as a fiction writer and as a Christian thinker, and his biographers and critics sometimes divide his personality in two: the storyteller and the moral educator, the "dreamer" and the "mentor." Yet a large part of Lewis's appeal, for both his audiences, lay in his ability to fuse imagination with instruction. "Let the pictures tell you their own moral," he once advised writers of children's stories. "But if they don't show you any moral, don't put one in. ... The only moral that is of any value is that which arises inevitably from the whole cast of the author's mind."

Storytelling came naturally to Lewis, who spent the rainy days of his childhood in Ireland writing about an imaginary world he called Boxen. His first published novel, Out of the Silent Planet, tells the story of a journey to Mars; its hero was loosely modeled on his friend and fellow Cambridge scholar J.R.R. Tolkien. Lewis enjoyed some popularity for his Space Trilogy (which continues in Perelandra and That Hideous Strength), but nothing compared to that which greeted his next imaginative journey, to an invented world of fauns, dwarfs, and talking animals -- a world now familiar to millions of readers as Narnia.

The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, the first book of the seven-volume Chronicles of Narnia, began as "a picture of a Faun carrying an umbrella and parcels in a snowy wood," according to Lewis. Years after that image first formed in his mind, others bubbled up to join it, producing what Kate Jackson, writing in Salon, called "a fascinating attempt to compress an almost druidic reverence for wild nature, Arthurian romance, Germanic folklore, the courtly poetry of Renaissance England and the fantastic beasts of Greek and Norse mythology into an entirely reimagined version of what's tritely called 'the greatest story ever told.'"

The Chronicles of Narnia was for decades the world's bestselling fantasy series for children. Although it was eventually superseded by Harry Potter, the series still holds a firm place in children's literature and the culture at large. (Narnia even crops up as a motif in Jonathan Franzen's 2001 novel The Corrections). Its last volume appeared in 1955; in that same year, Lewis published a personal account of his religious conversion in Surprised by Joy. The autobiography joined his other nonfiction books, including Mere Christianity, The Screwtape Letters, and The Great Divorce, as an exploration of faith, joy and the meaning of human existence.

Lewis's final work of fiction, Till We Have Faces, came out in 1956. Its chilly critical reception and poor early sales disappointed Lewis, but the book's reputation has slowly grown; Lionel Adey called it the "wisest and best" of Lewis's stories for adults. Lewis continued to write about Christianity, as well as literature and literary criticism, for several more years. After his death in 1963, The New Yorker opined, "If wit and wisdom, style and scholarship are requisites to passage through the pearly gates, Mr. Lewis will be among the angels."

Good To Know

The imposing wardrobe Lewis and his brother played in as children is now in Wheaton, Illinois, at the Wade Center of Wheaton College, which also houses the world's largest collection of Lewis-related documents, according to The Christian Science Monitor.

The 1994 movie, Shadowlands, based on the play of the same name, cast Anthony Hopkins as Lewis. It tells the story of his friendship with, and then marriage to, an American divorcee named Joy Davidman (played by Debra Winger), who died of cancer four years after their marriage. Lewis's own book about coping with that loss, A Grief Observed, was initially published under the pseudonym N. W. Clerk.

Several poems, stories, and a novel fragment published after Lewis's death have come under scrutiny as possible forgeries. On one side of the controversy is Walter Hooper, a trustee of Lewis's estate and editor of most of his posthumous works; on the other is Kathryn Lindskoog, a Lewis scholar who began publicizing her suspicions in 1988. Scandal or kooky conspiracy theory? The verdict's still out among readers.

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    1. Also Known As:
      Clive Staples Lewis (real name); Clive Hamilton, N.W. Clerk, Nat Whilk; called "Jack" by his friends
    1. Date of Birth:
      November 29, 1898
    2. Place of Birth:
      Belfast, Nothern Ireland
    1. Date of Death:
      November 22, 1963
    2. Place of Death:
      Headington, England

Read an Excerpt

Prince Caspian
The Return to Narnia

Chapter Fourteen

How All Were Very Busy

A little before two o'clock, Trumpkin and the Badger sat with the rest of the creatures at the wood's edge looking across at the gleaming line of Miraz's army which was about two arrow-shots away. In between, a square space of level grass had been staked for the combat. At the two far corners stood Glozelle and Sopespian with drawn swords. At the near corners were Giant Wimbleweather and the Bulgy Bear, who in spite of all their warnings was sucking his paws and looking, to tell the truth, uncommonly silly. To make up for this, Glenstorm on the right of the lists, stock-still except when he stamped a hind hoof occasionally on the turf, looked much more imposing than the Telmarine baron who faced him on the left. Peter had just shaken hands with Edmund and the Doctor, and was now walking down to the combat. It was like the moment before the pistol goes at an important race, but very much worse.

"I wish Aslan had turned up before it came to this," said Trumpkin.

"So do I," said Trufflehunter. "But look behind you."

"Crows and crockery!" muttered the Dwarf as soon as he had done so. "What are they? Huge people -- beautiful people -- like gods and goddesses and giants. Hundreds and thousands of them, closing in behind us. What are they?"

"It's the Dryads and Hamadryads and Silvans," said Trufflehunter. "Aslan has wakened them."

"Humph!" said the Dwarf. "That'll be very useful if the enemy try any treachery. But it won't help the High King very much if Miraz proves handier with his sword."

The Badger said nothing, for now Peter and Miraz wereentering the lists from opposite ends, both on foot, both in chain shirts, with helmets and shields. They advanced till they were close together. Both bowed and seemed to speak, but it was impossible to hear what they said. Next moment the two swords flashed in the sunlight. For a second the clash could be heard but it was immediately drowned because both armies began shouting like crowds at a football match.

"Well done, Peter, oh, well done!" shouted Edmund as he saw Miraz reel back a whole pace and a half. "Follow it up, quick!" And Peter did, and for a few seconds it looked as if the fight might be won. But then Miraz pulled himself together -- began to make real use of his height and weight. "Miraz! Miraz! The King! The King!" came the roar of the Telmarines. Caspian and Edmund grew white with sickening anxiety.

"Peter is taking some dreadful knocks," said Edmund.

"Hullo!" said Caspian. "What's happening now?"

"Both falling apart," said Edmund. "A bit blown, I expect. Watch. Ah, now they're beginning again, more scientifically this time. Circling round and round, feeling each other's defences."

"I'm afraid this Miraz knows his work," muttered the Doctor. But hardly had he said this when there was such a clapping and baying and throwing up of hoods among the Old Narnians that it was nearly deafening.

"What was it? What was it?" asked the Doctor. "My old eyes missed it."

"The High King has pricked him in the armpit," said Caspian, still clapping. "Just where the arm-hole of the hauberk let the point through. First blood."

"It's looking ugly again, now, though," said Edmund. "Peter's not using his shield properly. He must be hurt in the left arm."

It was only too true. Everyone could see that Peter's shield hung limp. The shouting of the Telmarines redoubled.

"You've seen more battles than I," said Caspian. "Is there any chance now?"

"Precious little," said Edmund. "I suppose he might just do it. With luck."

"Oh, why did we let it happen at all?" said Caspian.

Suddenly all the shouting on both sides died down. Edmund was puzzled for a moment. Then he said, "Oh, I see. They've both agreed to a rest. Come on, Doctor. You and I may be able to do something for the High King." They ran down to the lists and Peter came outside the ropes to meet them, his face red and sweaty, his chest heaving.

"Is your left arm wounded?" asked Edmund.

"It's not exactly a wound," Peter said. "I got the full weight of his shoulder on my shield -- like a load of bricks -- and the rim of the shield drove into my wrist. I don't think it's broken, but it might be a sprain. If you could tie it up very tight I think I could manage."

While they were doing this, Edmund asked anxiously, "What do you think of him, Peter?"

"Tough," said Peter. "Very tough. I have a chance if I can keep him on the hop till his weight and short wind come against him -- in this hot sun too. To tell the truth, I haven't much chance else. Give my love to -- to everyone at home, Ed, if he gets me. Here he comes into the lists again. So long, old chap. Goodbye, Doctor. And I say, Ed, say something specially nice to Trumpkin. He's been a brick."

Edmund couldn't speak. He walked back with the Doctor to his own lines with a sick feeling in his stomach.

But the new bout went well. Peter now seemed to be able to make some use of his shield, and he certainly made good use of his feet. He was almost playing Tig with Miraz now, keeping out of range, shifting his ground, making the enemy work.

"Coward!" booed the Telmarines. "Why don't you stand up to him? Don't you like it, eh? Thought you'd come to fight, not dance. Yah!"

"Oh, I do hope he won't listen to them," said Caspian.

Prince Caspian
The Return to Narnia
. Copyright © by C. Lewis. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.
Read More Show Less

First Chapter

Chapter Fourteen

How All Were Very Busy

A little before two o'clock, Trumpkin and the Badger sat with the rest of the creatures at the wood's edge looking across at the gleaming line of Miraz's army which was about two arrow-shots away. In between, a square space of level grass had been staked for the combat. At the two far corners stood Glozelle and Sopespian with drawn swords. At the near corners were Giant Wimbleweather and the Bulgy Bear, who in spite of all their warnings was sucking his paws and looking, to tell the truth, uncommonly silly. To make up for this, Glenstorm on the right of the lists, stock-still except when he stamped a hind hoof occasionally on the turf, looked much more imposing than the Telmarine baron who faced him on the left. Peter had just shaken hands with Edmund and the Doctor, and was now walking down to the combat. It was like the moment before the pistol goes at an important race, but very much worse.

"I wish Aslan had turned up before it came to this," said Trumpkin.

"So do I," said Trufflehunter. "But look behind you."

"Crows and crockery!" muttered the Dwarf as soon as he had done so. "What are they? Huge people -- beautiful people -- like gods and goddesses and giants. Hundreds and thousands of them, closing in behind us. What are they?"

"It's the Dryads and Hamadryads and Silvans," said Trufflehunter. "Aslan has wakened them."

"Humph!" said the Dwarf. "That'll be very useful if the enemy try any treachery. But it won't help the High King very much if Miraz proves handier with his sword."

The Badger said nothing, for now Peter and Miraz were entering the lists from oppositeends, both on foot, both in chain shirts, with helmets and shields. They advanced till they were close together. Both bowed and seemed to speak, but it was impossible to hear what they said. Next moment the two swords flashed in the sunlight. For a second the clash could be heard but it was immediately drowned because both armies began shouting like crowds at a football match.

"Well done, Peter, oh, well done!" shouted Edmund as he saw Miraz reel back a whole pace and a half. "Follow it up, quick!" And Peter did, and for a few seconds it looked as if the fight might be won. But then Miraz pulled himself together -- began to make real use of his height and weight. "Miraz! Miraz! The King! The King!" came the roar of the Telmarines. Caspian and Edmund grew white with sickening anxiety.

"Peter is taking some dreadful knocks," said Edmund.

"Hullo!" said Caspian. "What's happening now?"

"Both falling apart," said Edmund. "A bit blown, I expect. Watch. Ah, now they're beginning again, more scientifically this time. Circling round and round, feeling each other's defences."

"I'm afraid this Miraz knows his work," muttered the Doctor. But hardly had he said this when there was such a clapping and baying and throwing up of hoods among the Old Narnians that it was nearly deafening.

"What was it? What was it?" asked the Doctor. "My old eyes missed it."

"The High King has pricked him in the armpit," said Caspian, still clapping. "Just where the arm-hole of the hauberk let the point through. First blood."

"It's looking ugly again, now, though," said Edmund. "Peter's not using his shield properly. He must be hurt in the left arm."

It was only too true. Everyone could see that Peter's shield hung limp. The shouting of the Telmarines redoubled.

"You've seen more battles than I," said Caspian. "Is there any chance now?"

"Precious little," said Edmund. "I suppose he might just do it. With luck."

"Oh, why did we let it happen at all?" said Caspian.

Suddenly all the shouting on both sides died down. Edmund was puzzled for a moment. Then he said, "Oh, I see. They've both agreed to a rest. Come on, Doctor. You and I may be able to do something for the High King." They ran down to the lists and Peter came outside the ropes to meet them, his face red and sweaty, his chest heaving.

"Is your left arm wounded?" asked Edmund.

"It's not exactly a wound," Peter said. "I got the full weight of his shoulder on my shield -- like a load of bricks -- and the rim of the shield drove into my wrist. I don't think it's broken, but it might be a sprain. If you could tie it up very tight I think I could manage."

While they were doing this, Edmund asked anxiously, "What do you think of him, Peter?"

"Tough," said Peter. "Very tough. I have a chance if I can keep him on the hop till his weight and short wind come against him -- in this hot sun too. To tell the truth, I haven't much chance else. Give my love to -- to everyone at home, Ed, if he gets me. Here he comes into the lists again. So long, old chap. Goodbye, Doctor. And I say, Ed, say something specially nice to Trumpkin. He's been a brick."

Edmund couldn't speak. He walked back with the Doctor to his own lines with a sick feeling in his stomach.

But the new bout went well. Peter now seemed to be able to make some use of his shield, and he certainly made good use of his feet. He was almost playing Tig with Miraz now, keeping out of range, shifting his ground, making the enemy work.

"Coward!" booed the Telmarines. "Why don't you stand up to him? Don't you like it, eh? Thought you'd come to fight, not dance. Yah!"

"Oh, I do hope he won't listen to them," said Caspian.

Prince Caspian. Copyright © by C. Lewis. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 295 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(160)

4 Star

(68)

3 Star

(39)

2 Star

(17)

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(11)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 296 Customer Reviews
  • Posted May 4, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Prince Caspian: Superb

    In the novel Prince Caspian by C.S. Lewis, Lucy, Edmund, Peter, and Susan accidentally arrive back in Narnia. They come across a dwarf, Trumpkin, who works for Caspian (nephew of Miraz). Caspian's tutor, Doctor Cornelius, helps him escape into the wilderness of Narnia. King Miraz furiously searched for Caspian. Meanwhile, Caspian had sent Trumkin out to search for the kings of Narnia (Lucy, Edmund, Peter, and Susan). As they make their way to Caspian, they get lost. Lucy sees Aslan, who says that the Detour was his fault and that they should follow him. The two girls and boys split up and go separate ways. The boys find Caspian and Miraz arguing. This is when Peter steps in and fights Miraz. The very next day, Aslan creates a doorway for them to go through to go back to England. They soon arrive in the railway station like nothing had ever happened. There are many positives from this book. I like how one year goes by in our time when hundreds go by in narnian time. This book may seem very long, but if you really enjoy it, it will fly by. The book has some negatives in it too. I like how C.S. is telling two stories in the beginning (The kings and Caspian). Some of the words are very hard to understand. The book can get boring and long. C.S. Lewis writes in an expository manner by using descriptive words and explaining things that are hard to understand. She writes with many many details. If you like adventure and battles, this book is for you. The book flies by making you want to read other books in this series. There are many other books by C.S. Lewis such as the following: The "Chronicles of Narnia", Yours, Jack, Words to Live By, Mere Christianity, Space Trilogy, The Great Divorce: A Dream, and many more.

    6 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 16, 2008

    It is a great story!

    This book is about 4 children named Peter, Edmund, Susan and Lucy who were in the Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe. They go back to Narnia again. They met Prince Caspian who needs help to fight his evil uncle named Miraz who is the king of Narnia. Miraz killed the old Narnians and Caspian needs to be the new king of Narnia so that the Narnians can be free. My favorite part of the story was when Peter fought Miraz. I would recommend this book to 12-16 year old boys. They would like this book because it is filled with lots of action.

    6 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 4, 2012

    Great

    Movie was terrible but the book was way better

    4 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 9, 2012

    Christian

    If you havnt figured it out.......this is a christian book

    4 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 2, 2008

    awesome book!!

    I have finished reading the book The chronicles of Narnia 'Prince Caspian'. This book i would say is very interesting. In a a way i think this book is quite better than others that i have have read. Why you may ask, well because is has action and adventure with these four kids named Peter, Susan, Edmund, and Lucy Pevensey. I really enjoyed reading this book. The reason is because, first of all, this book is on Narnia, and I happened to like the other books based on The Chronicles of Narnia. Next, this has action and is quite funny too. I really suggest for you to read this book, The Chronicles Of Narnia 'Prince Caspian'

    3 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 24, 2008

    Okay...GOOD!...not really...

    When I bought the boxed set before the first Narnia movie was released, the story of the Magician's Nephew pulled me into the realm of possibly the greatest writer of all time. I had a great time reading the first three. But when I started Prince Caspian, I don't know, maybe I was just really tired, but I couldn't make it through the book. It seemed quite sudden. A person blows the horn, and well, the 4 reappear in Narnia. Maybe I was really tired, I might give it another shot, but I know which books are good, I am willing to stay up late for them, but I don't think Prince Caspian met up to my standards.

    3 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 25, 2013

    To: Great book!

    What in the world? Thats disgusting! Not to be rude, though. Anyway, loved the book and will be reading it again!

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 18, 2013

    This book was outstanding. The C.S Lewis has created this entire

    This book was outstanding. The C.S Lewis has created this entirely new world, and it seems to be pulled right out of our greatest childhood fantasy's. No amount of words can do this book justice you have to read it for yourself.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 4, 2013

    Very good

    I love the book.(')>

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 16, 2013

    Great read ,just as good as the movie!

    Loved the book and movie hard to decide which one i liked better.good job c.s lewis!my favorite chacter is eustace because he learned a good life lesson.aslan is very good too!

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 4, 2013

    Prince Caspian

    If you've fallen in love with The Chronicles of Narnia, you've gotta check out PC!! This book is one of my all-time favorites. The book could be read as either book 2 or book 4, depending on which order you're reading them in. You can either read it after The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe, or after The Hose and His Boy. Either way, it's a great read!!

    By the way, I think the filmmakers did a wonderful job on the movie. Just saying. :0)

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 10, 2014

    LONG LIVE NARNIA

    They should make another movie!

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 8, 2014

    LONG LIVE NARNIA

    This is my favorite seires i love the movie!!;)


    I HOPE THEY MAKE A NOTHER MOVIE WITH USTIES
    WHO IS WITH ME !
    REPLY BACK SAYING TO LONG LIVE NARNIA AND IF YOU DONT PUT LONG LIVE NARNIA IN ALL CAPITALS YOU WILL NOT BE WITH ME ON WHO WANTS A NOTHER MOVIE!!

    BYE HOPE YOU REPLY BACK
    NARNIA FOREVER

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 26, 2014

    Asommest book ever

    This book is asome

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 4, 2013

    LONG LIVE ASLAN

    This is the best book in the seires and I disagree with Horible he says,"this book is not exiting."Things don't come from your mind they come from your heart and don't jugde things by the cover. This book does conect with the others. Think about this,"If some people came to a party but one looks nerdy, do you think you should be mean."

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 16, 2014

    The Call

    It started out as a feeling, wich the grew into a hope, wich then turned into a quiet thought wich then turned into a quiet word, and then that word grew louder and louder til it was a battle cry! I'll come back when u call me no need to say goodbye. Just because everythings changing doesnt mean its never been this way before, all u can do is try to know who your friends are as u head off to the war, pick a star on the dark horizon and follow the light, youll come back when its over, no need to say goodbye! Now we're back to the beginning its just a feeling and no one knows yet, but just because they cant feel it too doesnt mean that u have to forget, let ur memories grow stronger and stronger til theyre before ur eyes, youll come back when they call u no need to say goodbye, youll come back when they cal u no need to say goodye.

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 18, 2013

    No he

    Dont

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 16, 2012

    Awesome

    Cool!!















































































































































    1 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 10, 2012

    best book ever!!!

    Need to read

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 21, 2011

    ehhhhh

    i like the second book MUCH better from nine year old

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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