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Prince Charming Isn't Coming: How Women Get Smart About Money
     

Prince Charming Isn't Coming: How Women Get Smart About Money

4.2 4
by Barbara Stanny
 

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Now updated: the classic guide that teaches women how to take control of their own finances

When this groundbreaking yet compassionate book was first published ten years ago, it lifted a veil on women's resistance to managing their money, revealing that many were still waiting for a prince to rescue them financially. In this revised edition, which

Overview

Now updated: the classic guide that teaches women how to take control of their own finances

When this groundbreaking yet compassionate book was first published ten years ago, it lifted a veil on women's resistance to managing their money, revealing that many were still waiting for a prince to rescue them financially. In this revised edition, which reflects our present-day economic world, Barbara Stanny inspires readers to take charge of their money and their lives. Filled with real-life success stories and practical advice - from tips on identifying the factors that keep women fearful and dependent to checklists and steps for overcoming them - this book is the next best thing to having one's own financial coach.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
A heart-to-heart talk about the psychological and financial tools women need to take control of their economic destiny. (The Seattle Times)
The Seattle Times
A heart-to-heart talk about the psychological and financial tools women need to take control of their economic destiny.
BUST Magazine
An easy read and a painless intro to the not-so-mysterious world of financial security, Stanny helps you realize that what it all comes down to is being responsible for yourself, your future, and your finances.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780143112051
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
04/24/2007
Edition description:
Revised
Pages:
240
Sales rank:
326,432
Product dimensions:
5.10(w) x 7.70(h) x 0.70(d)
Age Range:
18 - 17 Years

Meet the Author

Barbara Stanny is a journalist, former syndicated columnist, career counselor, and co-author of two books, including How to Be Happily Employed. She holds a master's degree in counseling psychology and lives in Washington state.

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Prince Charming Isn't Coming: How Women Get Smart about Money 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Although I didn't expect the whole book to be about investing rather than other financial issues, I completely enjoyed reading this book. But you don't have to understand Wall Street to understand her message. The book is about gaining back your power. She uses money as the medium but I have definitely felt more in control of other parts of my life from reading this book. You don't have to wait for "Prince Charming" to help you, whoever or whatever that may be. She goes through 7 "realizations" that she saw in successful women and gives simple steps on how to take action on them (in a fiscal manner). I highly recommend Prince Charming Isn't Coming, whether you think you have money problems or not!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
When social independence relies upon economic independence, the need for such a book is clear. Unfortunately, in a real world of gender and age discrimination where the double standard has all but been made the ideal, economic independence for women is still an illusion. In an equitable world where the work of both men and women are valued equally, women would not be reduced to poverty unless they were an adjunct to a man. To achieve that world, however, much work needs to be done to alter attitudes which continue to create an unfair preference for female submission in relationships. This book offers a 'beginning' to deal with the inequities by making awareness an important feature in practical management of individual lives that may offer some measure of both economic and social independence for both. Now, if corporate America could get the message, successful human resource management might be the outcome which offers hope to escape poverty.