The Prince: The Original Classic

( 174 )

Overview

The Handbook for Leaders

The Prince is often regarded as the first true leadership book. It shocked contemporary readers with its ruthless call for fearless and effective action. With simple prose and straightforward logic, Machiavelli's guide still has the power to surprise and inform anyone hoping to make their way in the world.

This keepsake edition includes an introduction by Tom Butler-Bowdon, drawing out lessons for managers and business ...

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Overview

The Handbook for Leaders

The Prince is often regarded as the first true leadership book. It shocked contemporary readers with its ruthless call for fearless and effective action. With simple prose and straightforward logic, Machiavelli's guide still has the power to surprise and inform anyone hoping to make their way in the world.

This keepsake edition includes an introduction by Tom Butler-Bowdon, drawing out lessons for managers and business leaders, and showing how The Prince remains vital reading for anyone in the realm of business or politics.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780857080783
  • Publisher: Wiley, John & Sons, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 9/21/2010
  • Series: Capstone Classics Series , #5
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 240
  • Sales rank: 691,438
  • Product dimensions: 5.30 (w) x 7.80 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Niccolò Machiavelli was an Italian philosopher and writer, and is considered one of the founders of modern political science. He was a diplomat and civil servant in the Florentine Republic in the sixteenth century, until arrested for conspiracy in 1513 after which he gave his time to writing.

Tom Butler-Bowdon is the author of five bestselling books on classic self-help and motivational writing. He has been described by USA Today as “a true scholar of this type of literature.”

His first book, 50 Self-Help Classics, won the 2004 Benjamin Franklin award. www.butler-bowdon.com

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Table of Contents

Dedication.

I Of the Various Kinds of Princedom, and of the Ways in Which They Are Acquired.

II Of Hereditary Princedoms.

III Of Mixed Princedoms.

IV Why the Kingdom of Darius, Conquered by Alexander, Did Not, on Alexander's Death, Rebel Against His Successors.

V How Cities or Provinces Which Before Their Acquisition Have Lived Under Their Own Laws Are To Be Governed.

VI Of New Princedoms Which a Prince Acquires With His Own Arms and by Merit.

VII Of New Princedoms Acquired By the Aid of Others and By Good Fortune.

VIII Of Those Who By Their Crimes Come to Be Princes.

IX Of the Civil Princedom.

X How the Strength of All Princedoms Should Be Measured.

XI Of Ecclesiastical Princedoms.

XII How Many Different Kinds of Soldiers There Are, and of Mercenaries.

XIII Of Auxiliary, Mixed, and National Arms.

XIV Of the Duty of a Prince In Respect of Military Affairs.

XV Of the Qualities In Respect of Which Men, and Most of all Princes, Are Praised or Blamed.

XVI Of Liberality and Miserliness.

XVII Of Cruelty and Clemency, and Whether It Is Better To Be Loved or Feared.

XVIII How Princes Should Keep Faith.

XIX That a Prince Should Seek to Escape Contempt and Hatred.

XX Whether Fortresses, and Certain Other Expedients to Which Princes Often Have Recourse, are Profitable or Hurtful.

XXI How a Prince Should Bear Himself So As to Acquire Reputation.

XXII Of the Secretaries of Princes.

XXIII That Flatterers Should Be Shunned.

XXIV Why the Princes of Italy Have Lost Their States.

XXV What Fortune Can Effect in Human Affairs, and How She May Be Withstood.

XXVI An Exhortation to Liberate Italy from the Barbarians.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 174 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(73)

4 Star

(46)

3 Star

(23)

2 Star

(14)

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(18)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 162 Customer Reviews
  • Posted February 18, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    The original political action handbook

    Many Americans do not understand the motives and actions of the politicians whom they elect. The voters have expectations, but they fail to appreciate that the politicians have personal and professional agendas. THE PRINCE rips the curtain away to expose the true motivations of politicians, whether a "progressive" agenda of Barak Obama, the "left-wing liberal" bias of Nancy Pelosi, the "tea party conservative" blurts of Sarah Palin, or the vague agendas of the smilingly attractive and apparently patriotic and caring (but otherwise unknown) candidates for local school board. Despots aren't made; they're chosen. Leaders aren't born; they're made. Followers aren't created; they're the people who give away their rights and responsibilities to others who offer to think and choose for them. Machiavelli didn't invent the rules; he simply observed the rise and dominance of the most powerful family in Italian history and shared their secrets with posterity. Truth is truth, whether it describes Renaissance Venice during the time of great painters and corrupt popes or Washington DC during the time of vapid platitudes and bloated bureaucracies. EVERY management, business, political science, sociology, psychology, and education major should read this book before completing their sophomore year; otherwise, they'll miss the opportunity to manipulate minds effectively during their junior and senior years...and beyond. Because it predates the hollow pretext of "political correctness" and such laughable conceits as "unity through diversity," THE PRINCE explains what true power is, how to achieve it, how to wrest it from others and wield it effectively, and how to gain more of it at the expense of stupid people who haven't read Machiavelli. The author presumes "the why" is simple: having power beats the alternative.

    26 out of 33 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 7, 2009

    AP World History Book Review: a description of my opinion of the book

    I am a student that read this book, The Prince by Niccolo Machiavelli. I believe that this book is great for people that want to be a leader sometime in life or history buffs that want to learn more about leadership. I would not reccomend this to people that either just want a book to read to pass time or people that are not interested in the subject. I personally thought this book was good because I enjoy historical texts. Last year in my regular world history class, we read an excerpt from this book (or at least a form of this book) and I found it very interesting how Machiavelli included things such as poetic devices to incorporate with things like leadership. In case anyone doesn't know, this book was written during the Renaissance time period.
    Back to a point of mine made earlier, I wouldn't reccomend this to some people just because people like to complain about the length of books and that the book was boring. That would be the case with this book. I thought it was good, but honestly I was pretty bored with it after periods of reading. But we have to remember that historical texts like this were written back when times were peaceful to where now we have books about the world ending so there is a distinct difference between the two. All in all, I liked this book but it definately wasn't one of my favorites.

    13 out of 22 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 24, 2010

    Ashlee, a student at The Gereau Center

    The Prince is a very long "how to" essay written by Machiavelli and addressed to Lorenzo de'Medici. It was designed to help Lorenzo, a prince, rule his country. The essay has also been looked at by government officials, whether they be princes or presidents or congressmen, around the world to help with the governing of their state or country. The book has many literary devices in it, but the most notable of them are: descriptive chapter titles, allusions, and the metaphors. Machiavelli titles his chapters so they describe the very thing that the chapters will entail. It's almost as if you can read just the title of the chapter and feel like you could tell someone exactly what the chapter is about. For example, the chapter title, "Of Cruelty and Mercy, and Whether It Is Better To Be Loved Than Feared, or the Contrary." Machiavelli also uses allusion to explain the point he is making in whichever chapter he is making the point in. He makes points and then supports them with someone who has done the opposite or the same as the point he is making. He does this to express the validity of his beliefs of ruling. He refers to Alexander the Great and Ceaser. Machiavelli also includes metaphors all throughout the book. For example, "Thus, whoever examines minutely the actions of this man will find him a very fierce lion and a very astute fox."I don't personally have a favorite or worst part of the book because I didn't really enjoy reading any part of the book. However there are many valid points concerning leadership in the book.

    8 out of 18 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 19, 2013

    Essential book

    Machiavelli has a bad reputation but this is because people judge him by this work alone. This is because he was not wtiting about the way things should be but the way things were/are. For another view of a differing side of his thinking read his "Discourses on Livy". The Prince is a book that should be read by everyone.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 10, 2009

    AP World History book review of the Prince, by Niccolo Machiavelli

    The Prince by Niccolo Machiavelli is a great overall book for people interested in the often violent means that political power is seized, kept, and lost. This book greatly portrays the leadership of leaders in the Renaissance time period and describes hereditary principalities, which are inherited by the leader. I wouldn't recommend this book to people who either aren't interesting in politics or the Renaissance time period. Also if you like reading really long books than this definitely is not one for you. Overall in my mind this was a great historical classic and I recommend it.

    2 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 14, 2009

    Death in a Book

    If you are looking for a way to torture your children, making them read this book is the best advice I can give you. This book was torture reading. The vocabulary was hard for me to understand, along with the many concepts he had on how to be a successful prince. It's not a very long book but when I read it, it seemed like it would never end. He repeats the same concept over and over in different ways, making it harder to understand. Also, the way he writes is very confusing. I do not recommend this book at all, unless you enjoy reading, history, and a challenge.

    2 out of 13 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 12, 2014

    Essential book

    Loved it..

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 16, 2013

    I found it impossible to read this. It was by far the most borin

    I found it impossible to read this. It was by far the most boring work I have ever laid eyes on. Tedious does not even begin to explain the writing. It goes on and on about nothing.

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 16, 2013

    Extremely disappointed - not suggested for academic use

    While this e-book was wonderfully translated, it lacked a lot of information about Empress Theodora. When trying to find bountiful information about her, I implore you to not buy this e-book.

    0 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 23, 2013

    Seth here

    Hay mag i think i got locked out

    0 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 23, 2013

    SETH TALEXO TO CHELSE

    Hay i am here are u

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 3, 2012

    Okay but not my cup of tea

    This is not something I would keep in my bookshelf. I can see why people would consider this a classic, but for me this is too repetitive and not very cohesive in my opinion. Then again, this is a letter and it is written very well and it is organized into sections. Overall, it was not an exciting read for me for a high school summer assignment.

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 14, 2012

    Why is the cover Cesare Borgia?

    Why is the cover Cesare Borgia?

    0 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 8, 2012

    In school

    Reading it in school so boring.about middle age politics.

    0 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 14, 2012

    The italian history

    The parts where someone was once famous but is any more where s little tricky

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 8, 2011

    Excellent!!!

    Every thoughtful person should have have this book in their home or on their nook!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 17, 2011

    An interesting classic

    "A Prince ought to have no other aim or thought, nor select anything else for his study, than war and its rules and discipline; for this is the sole art that belongs to him who rules, and it is of such force that it not only upholds those who are born princes, but it often enables men to rise from a private station to that rank".

    The previous paragraph is just one of many eye popping statements in this little yet powerful book written about half a millennium ago. I have to be very honest when I say I had no clue what I was getting into when I picked it up. I actually did so because a good friend read it and told me she was very impressed with Machiavelli's ruthlessness. The classic philosophy of "The ends justify the means" gets perfectly displayed in this manual for tyrants.

    When Machavelli refers to a "Prince" he refers to the ruler of a territory, regardless of its title or the way such a territory was obtained. When reading this book you have to do your best to set yourself in 1513, when it was written and the principles of democracy and international law were not what they are today. But still, it is an essay where sanguinariness is just a byproduct of your need to rule a territory and its people.

    I was mesmerized by the specific instructions on how to dominate a principality based on the different ways you came to rule it. You cringe as you pass the pages and it touches on the best armies to have and how to make them willing to die for you, how mean you have to be in order to be respected, how to balance being loved and feared by your people and even how to keep your subjects distracted by factions and fostering enmities. It is funny when he specifically states he does not want to get to deep into the princes of the Church but still touches on the wickedness of the rulings of the Popes and their powers.

    The more you get into it this book, the more you feel that Dick Cheney read it just before ordering his puppet George W. Bush to invade Iraq for no justifiable reason. As you flip the pages you see the script that tyrants like Fidel Castro and Hugo Chavez have been using to subdue their people in order to keep themselves afloat.

    I still wonder what was the original audience of this book was when it was originally written.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 23, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    ok

    ok book

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 12, 2011

    Great for a Civis and Free Enterprise class!

    loved this book.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 2, 2010

    An Amazing Read

    The Prince is full of strategy that is as useful to us today as when it was written long ago. Human psychology really doesn't change over time, so the principals work just as well now as then. This book should be read by anyone in a competitive field-you can be assured your competition has probably already read it. Machiavelli's advice is practical and has been easy to put into practice in my own life.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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