The Princess and the Goblin

The Princess and the Goblin

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by George MacDonald
     
 

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The Princess and the Goblin is a children's fantasy novel by George MacDonald and is the sequel to this book is The Princess and Curdie.

Anne Thaxter Eaton writes in ‘’A Critical History of Children's Literature’’ that ‘’The

Overview

This ebook is complete with Table of Contents making navigation quicker and easier.

The Princess and the Goblin is a children's fantasy novel by George MacDonald and is the sequel to this book is The Princess and Curdie.

Anne Thaxter Eaton writes in ‘’A Critical History of Children's Literature’’ that ‘’The Princess and the Goblin’’ and its sequel “quietly suggest in every incident ideas of courage and honor. Jeffrey Holdaway writing in New Zealand Art Monthly said that both books start out as “normal fairy tales but slowly become stranger”, and that they contain layers of symbolism similar to that of Lewis Carroll’s work

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940011886201
Publisher:
WHITE DOG PUBLISHING
Publication date:
10/19/2010
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
546 KB

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The Princess and the Goblin 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 609 reviews.
kaseysimba More than 1 year ago
Please read this book! It was absolutely charming. I used to love the cartoon when I was really young, so I wanted to read the book. I remember loving how Irene found a mysterious area of her house where she met her great-great-grandmother, and this book definitely captured that same feeling, only it was about a million times better.
darthlaurie More than 1 year ago
When I was a baby my parents bought this Colliers collection of books that had a ton of different stories and poems. A lot of those books were lost by the time I was five or six. The Fairy Tales and Legends book wasn't lost and I read it from cover to cover when I was in third grade. One of my favorite stories was the first chapter of The Princess and the Goblin. It was enchanting. I didn't realize back then that it was only the first chapter of a wonderful book. A couple years later I discovered MacDonald's The Light Princess and I loved it just as much, not realizing that both tales were written by the same author. It wasn't until I started working at a university library many years later and had a hankering for reading The Light Princess again that I connected the two stories. I thumbed through The Princess and the Goblin and realized it was the story of Princess Irene. George MacDonald was a brilliant writer. He has a soothing omnipotent grandfatherly voice that shines through his stories. You know that Princess Irene and Curdy will be okay in their adventures. The stories are well written and fun to read. I think they're timeless and if I had chosen to have children, they would be well acquainted with George MacDonald's fairy tales. If you're looking for a fairy tale that hasn't been Disneyfied and told too often, check out The Princess and the Goblin or The Light Princess. Curdy also has his own adventures and they're every bit as delightful as the other books.
HomeSchoolBookReview More than 1 year ago
Eight-year-old Princess Irene resides in a remote castle with her nurse Lootie and several other servants while her papa-king travels all over his kingdom. The reason that the Princess lives in seclusion is that the goblins who dwell under the mountain have sworn revenge on the king’s family. In addition, she has a mysterious and magical great-great-grandmother who is watching over her but who is seen by nobody else besides her. Also, she becomes friends with a twelve-year-old boy named Curdie who is the son of a local miner. When Irene and Lootie get lost after dark while on a walk in the mountains and are chased by goblins, they first meet Curdie who protects them from the goblins and helps to get them home safely. He pledges himself to guard the Princess. The goblins have hatched a double plot in which they plan to steal Irene to become the wife of their Prince Harelip and to use the mines to flood the castle. While working in the mines, Curdie overhears part of their plans but is captured and imprisoned by the goblins. However, Irene’s grandmother gives her a special thread by which she is led to rescue Curdie and get both of them back home again. Curdie sneaks onto the castle grounds one night to see if he can learn more about the goblins’ plans but is mistaken for a prowler by the king’s guards and shot with an arrow. He not only is imprisoned but also becomes quite sick with a fever. It is during this very time that the goblins mount their attack. Will they be successful? Will the Princess be saved or will she become the bride of Harelip? And what will happen to Curdie? Scottish-born author George MacDonald (1824-1905), though theologically considered a heretic, was a masterful storyteller who is often credited with inventing the genre of children’s fantasy literature and influenced such later youth fantasy writers as J. R. R. Tolkien, C. S. Lewis, and Madeline L’Engle. MacDonald began his literary career by telling fairy stories to his eleven children and then putting onplays for the poor in his neighborhood with his large family as the cast. His first such novel was At the Back of the North Wind published in 1871. The Princess and the Goblin was serialized in a journal called Good Words for the Young between 1870 and 1871 and then published in book form the following year. To be honest, this is one of the most fascinating and enjoyable books that I have ever read. The story of the Princess Irene and her friend Curdie continues in a sequel, The Princess and Curdie. I guess that I’ll just have to read it too.
Dane_R_Trumbore More than 1 year ago
The Princess and the Goblin is an enchanting tale about the most delightful little girl to spark our imaginations! The only pitty is that the character isn't real! Of all the C.S. Lewis books that I enjoyed, including his Chronicles of Narnia series, I have to say that The Princess and the Goblin captured my heart the most, and that George Macdonald is the great father and originator of litterary fantasy.
TinselHair More than 1 year ago
I thought it would be neat to read a fairy tale written in 1872 and found both the tale and manner of speech delightful. The author writes as if he is addressing a live audience and the tale, while slow in parts, is interesting enough to want to hear more. I look forward to reading more about the main characters in "The Princess and Curdie." It's a chance to see how fairy tales were written 150 years ago, how different they were, and how little some things have changed. (I also like the Nook feature that lets me look up a word on the spot - this story has more than a few unfamiliar words.)
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is one of my favorite books. I couldn't put it down after I started it. Anybody who enjoys fantasy or fairy tales will love this book. It is an amazing adventure that you can't wait to read more of. Anybody who reads this should then read The Princess and Curdie.
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