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The Princess and the Goblin

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Overview

Afterword by Peter Glassman. "In the facsimile of the 1920 edition, exquisite illustrations enhance the story of a young princess who is protected by her friend from goblins that live beneath the castle."—Booklist. A Books of Wonder(R) Classic.

A little princess is protected by her friend Curdie from the goblin miners who live beneath the castle.

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The Princess and the Goblin (Barnes & Noble Digital Library)

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Overview

Afterword by Peter Glassman. "In the facsimile of the 1920 edition, exquisite illustrations enhance the story of a young princess who is protected by her friend from goblins that live beneath the castle."—Booklist. A Books of Wonder(R) Classic.

A little princess is protected by her friend Curdie from the goblin miners who live beneath the castle.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"I have never concealed the fact that I regarded him as my master; indeed I fancy I have never written a book in which I did not quote from him." —C. S. Lewis

"The Princess and the Goblin and The Princess and Curdie are two of the most unusual and haunting fairy tales ever written." —Guardian

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781604594546
  • Publisher: Wilder Publications
  • Publication date: 8/8/2008
  • Pages: 132
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.31 (d)

Meet the Author

George MacDonald is considered one of the most important Christian authors of all time. His works include over twenty novels, many theological and critical works, and several volumes of poetry. But it is his stories for children that have endured the test of time. These works influenced many writers — including C.S. Lewis, who considered MacDonald his mentor, and J.R.R. Tolkien, who used MacDonald’s work as “a measuring stick” for his own writing in The Lord of the Rings.

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Read an Excerpt

CHAPTER 1

Why the Princess Has a Story about Her

There was once a little princess whose father was king over a great country full of mountains and valleys. His palace was built upon one of the mountains and was very grand and beautiful. The princess, whose name was Irene, was born there, but she was sent soon after her birth, because her mother was not very strong, to be brought up by country people in a large house, half castle, half farmhouse, on the side of another mountain, about halfway between its base and its peak.

The princess was a sweet little creature and at the time my story begins was about eight years old, I think, but she got older very fast. Her face was fair and pretty, with eyes like two bits of night sky, each with a star dissolved in the blue. Those eyes, you would have thought, must have known they came from there, so often were they turned up in that direction. The ceiling of her nursery was blue with stars in it, as like the sky as they could make it. But I doubt if ever she saw the real sky with the stars in it, for a reason, which I had better mention at once.

These mountains were full of hollow places underneath, huge caverns and winding ways, some with water running through them and some shining with all colors of the rainbow when a light was taken in. There would not have been much known about them had there not been mines there, great deep pits, with long galleries and passages running off from them, which had been dug to get at the ore of which the mountains were full. In the course of digging the miners came upon many of these natural caverns. A few of them had far-off openings out on the side of a mountain or into aravine.

Now in these subterranean caverns lived a strange race of beings, called by some gnomes, by some kobolds, by some goblins. There was a legend current in the country that at one time they lived above ground and were very like other people. But for some reason or other, concerning which there were different legendary theories, the king had laid what they thought too severe taxes upon them, or required observances of them they did not like, or had begun to treat them with more severity in some way or other, and to impose stricter laws; and the consequence was that they had all disappeared from the face of the country. According to the legend, however, instead of going to some other country they had all taken refuge in the subterranean caverns, whence they never came out but at night, and then seldom showed themselves in any numbers and never to many people at once. It was only in the least frequented and most difficult parts of the mountains that they were said to gather, even at night in the open air. Those who had caught sight of any of them said that they had greatly altered in the course of generations; and no wonder, seeing they lived away from the sun, in cold and wet and dark places. They were now, not ordinarily ugly, but either absolutely hideous or ludicrously grotesque both in face and form. There was no invention, they said, of the most lawless imagination expressed by pen or pencil, that could surpass the extravagance of their appearance. And as they grew misshapen in body, they had grown in knowledge and cleverness and now were able to do things no mortal could see the possibility of. But as they grew in cunning, they grew in mischief, and their great delight was in every way they could think of to annoy the people who lived in the open-air story above them. They had enough of affection left for each other to preserve them from being absolutely cruel for cruelty's sake to those that came in their way; but still they so heartily cherished the ancestral grudge against those who occupied their former possession, and especially against the descendants of the king who had caused their expulsion, that they sought every opportunity of tormenting them in ways that were as odd as their inventors; and although dwarfed and misshapen, they had strength equal to their cunning. In the process of time they had got a king and a government of their own, whose chief business, beyond their own simple affairs, was to devise trouble for their neighbors. It will now be pretty evident why the little princess had never seen the sky at night. They were much too afraid of the goblins to let her out of the house then, even in company with ever so many attendants; and they had good reason, as we shall see by and by.

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Table of Contents

I. Why the Princess Has a Story About Her 
2. The Princess Loses Herself 
3. The Princess and-We Shall See Who 
4. What the Nurse Thought of It 
5. The Princess Lets Well Alone 
6. The Little Miner 
7. The Mines 
8. The Goblins 
9. The Hall of the Goblin Palace 
10. The Princess's King-Papa 
II. The Old Lady's Bedroom 
12. A Short Chapter About Curdie 
13. The Cobs' Creatures 
14. That Night Week 
15. Woven and Then Spun 
16. The Ring 
17. Springtime 
18. Curdie's Clue 
19. Goblin Counsels 
20. Irene's Clue 

 2l. The Escape 
22. The Old Lady and Curdie 
23. Curdie and His Mother 
24. Irene Behaves like a Princess 
25. Curdie Comes to Grief 
26. The Goblin-Miners 
27. The Goblins in the King's House 
28. Curdie's Guide 
29. Masonwork 
30. The King and the Kiss 

3l. The Subterranean Waters 
32. The Last Chapter 

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 564 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(551)

4 Star

(11)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 566 Customer Reviews
  • Posted January 5, 2012

    Enchanting!

    Please read this book! It was absolutely charming. I used to love the cartoon when I was really young, so I wanted to read the book. I remember loving how Irene found a mysterious area of her house where she met her great-great-grandmother, and this book definitely captured that same feeling, only it was about a million times better.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 9, 2010

    One of the greatest fairy tales ever!

    When I was a baby my parents bought this Colliers collection of books that had a ton of different stories and poems. A lot of those books were lost by the time I was five or six. The Fairy Tales and Legends book wasn't lost and I read it from cover to cover when I was in third grade. One of my favorite stories was the first chapter of The Princess and the Goblin. It was enchanting. I didn't realize back then that it was only the first chapter of a wonderful book.
    A couple years later I discovered MacDonald's The Light Princess and I loved it just as much, not realizing that both tales were written by the same author.
    It wasn't until I started working at a university library many years later and had a hankering for reading The Light Princess again that I connected the two stories. I thumbed through The Princess and the Goblin and realized it was the story of Princess Irene.
    George MacDonald was a brilliant writer. He has a soothing omnipotent grandfatherly voice that shines through his stories. You know that Princess Irene and Curdy will be okay in their adventures. The stories are well written and fun to read. I think they're timeless and if I had chosen to have children, they would be well acquainted with George MacDonald's fairy tales. If you're looking for a fairy tale that hasn't been Disneyfied and told too often, check out The Princess and the Goblin or The Light Princess. Curdy also has his own adventures and they're every bit as delightful as the other books.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 14, 2012

    I Also Recommend:

    One of George MacDonald's Most Popular Works

    This book is typical of the fantasy writer George MacDonald.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 23, 2012

    Eight-year-old Princess Irene resides in a remote castle with he

    Eight-year-old Princess Irene resides in a remote castle with her nurse
    Lootie and several other servants while her papa-king travels all over
    his kingdom. The reason that the Princess lives in seclusion is that
    the goblins who dwell under the mountain have sworn revenge on the
    king’s family. In addition, she has a mysterious and magical
    great-great-grandmother who is watching over her but who is seen by
    nobody else besides her. Also, she becomes friends with a
    twelve-year-old boy named Curdie who is the son of a local miner. When
    Irene and Lootie get lost after dark while on a walk in the mountains
    and are chased by goblins, they first meet Curdie who protects them from
    the goblins and helps to get them home safely. He pledges himself to
    guard the Princess. The goblins have hatched a double plot in which
    they plan to steal Irene to become the wife of their Prince Harelip and
    to use the mines to flood the castle. While working in the mines,
    Curdie overhears part of their plans but is captured and imprisoned by
    the goblins. However, Irene’s grandmother gives her a special thread by
    which she is led to rescue Curdie and get both of them back home again.
    Curdie sneaks onto the castle grounds one night to see if he can learn
    more about the goblins’ plans but is mistaken for a prowler by the
    king’s guards and shot with an arrow. He not only is imprisoned but
    also becomes quite sick with a fever. It is during this very time that
    the goblins mount their attack. Will they be successful? Will the
    Princess be saved or will she become the bride of Harelip? And what
    will happen to Curdie? Scottish-born author George MacDonald
    (1824-1905), though theologically considered a heretic, was a masterful
    storyteller who is often credited with inventing the genre of children’s
    fantasy literature and influenced such later youth fantasy writers as J.
    R. R. Tolkien, C. S. Lewis, and Madeline L’Engle. MacDonald began his
    literary career by telling fairy stories to his eleven children and then
    putting onplays for the poor in his neighborhood with his large family
    as the cast. His first such novel was At the Back of the North Wind
    published in 1871. The Princess and the Goblin was serialized in a
    journal called Good Words for the Young between 1870 and 1871 and then
    published in book form the following year. To be honest, this is one of
    the most fascinating and enjoyable books that I have ever read. The
    story of the Princess Irene and her friend Curdie continues in a sequel,
    The Princess and Curdie. I guess that I’ll just have to read it too.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 1, 2012

    Great story, not well formatted. Incomplete text.

    I don't believe this is the complete text. I purchased another digital version (very inexpensively) and -- right from the top -- there is additional text that doesn't appear here. Also, there are several formatting errors in this e-book which are very annoying.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 7, 2012

    Love it.

    I adoreeeee.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 8, 2011

    An Interesting Tale

    I thought it would be neat to read a fairy tale written in 1872 and found both the tale and manner of speech delightful. The author writes as if he is addressing a live audience and the tale, while slow in parts, is interesting enough to want to hear more. I look forward to reading more about the main characters in "The Princess and Curdie." It's a chance to see how fairy tales were written 150 years ago, how different they were, and how little some things have changed. (I also like the Nook feature that lets me look up a word on the spot - this story has more than a few unfamiliar words.)

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 9, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    A Timeless and Enchanting Tale For Generations!

    The Princess and the Goblin is an enchanting tale about the most delightful little girl to spark our imaginations! The only pitty is that the character isn't real! Of all the C.S. Lewis books that I enjoyed, including his Chronicles of Narnia series, I have to say that The Princess and the Goblin captured my heart the most, and that George Macdonald is the great father and originator of litterary fantasy.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 10, 2008

    An Amazing Adventure

    This is one of my favorite books. I couldn't put it down after I started it. Anybody who enjoys fantasy or fairy tales will love this book. It is an amazing adventure that you can't wait to read more of. Anybody who reads this should then read The Princess and Curdie.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 15, 2014

    Love it

    My mom has read this book to all my 12 siblens before i was born and i love it

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 10, 2014

    A decidedly delightful fairy tale, of honor, bravery, and peril!

    A decidedly delightful fairy tale, of honor, bravery, and peril!

    This is my first of George MacDonald's, and I can honestly say I enjoyed this little fantasy adventure. I so enjoyed following the Princess, as she has now become a favorite literary character of mine, the way she so sweetly handles her royal privileges.

    I'm now looking forward to the sequel!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 21, 2013

    Love this book

    I recemend ages 7 to 12 but age dose'nt mater what maters is that you enjoy the book and when i say enjoy i mean slowley read the book so enjoy the book.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 17, 2013

    DwayggaczgFtftVgvTgHtGsuseydywududehdhdhggegddddhehed.lns?.am.

    QYhyHzhqzvHyDahuYhhuHhajHjbUhUOkmkJk?qkkkaQmldhaks.shhshjdlL..ksksjsjA..amzms.?.a.alsmdksiLa.nak?.??snsjsjszl..adda.Ajdjla?szmzsms.Dmmz.z.s.Msksl.?skL.adjzk.as..smskswkMsmslmsksdMMsddjdffm.zjfjfjfkfnz.msshjmm.zmzmsksdddjsjsmsjsjsjdjdnxdjsjsmddhshdshhdhdhdhddhhsjsnswhsyhhdhhwywhshshwshdedddhdddjskkdjdhjjddjdjdhhdhdhdddhdhzjK
    ?..LSJhs?HhshL.bzhha.kshzjK?ns?msjm.a?aA.aok?mkmmakMMa..mznmm?.MAM..aaK..l.am..al..DNNMSMM.lmsks.jsjsj??sjsjsjjJ?ksndjjaj.kshdhdddhxhdd?K.lammsms.aasq.kkksmka.asha.na.kak.kwkskmkzllm

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 5, 2013

    Love it

    Love it great book definetly recomend it

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 3, 2012

    A-ok!

    Very good. I would definantly reccomend this

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 1, 2012

    Great story, complete text, well formatted.

    A great story. This Barnes and Noble version contains the complete text and the formatting of the e-book is excellent.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 3, 2012

    Hdhdh

    Ywhdudghdyrrhekdisydhdjzkzhdjd

    0 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 15, 2012

    1

    Favorite!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 3, 2012

    Amazing!!!!!

    This book is my favorite book by far!!! I can't believe how much you can see the picture when you read it!!! I love how adventureous the story is. When you read the first couple chapters of this book you imediently want to read more and before you know it, your at the end of the book because you were so in to it. I think if anyone read this book they would want to read it again and again! I loved this book and I'm sure you would love it to if you read it.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 24, 2011

    Super

    Read when 7 it is addicting.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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