Princess Baby

( 7 )

Overview

Here is the first book in the Princess Baby collection, followed by the picture book Princess Baby, Night-Night and the board book Princess Baby on the Go!

Poor baby, no one calls her by her real name! “I am not a buttercup, or a giggly goose. I am not a cupcake. Please don’t call me Little Lamb, and never ever Gum Drop,” she insists. With a curtsy and a twirl, again and again our protagonist makes it abundantly clear who she is. She wears a shiny crown, a fancy dress, sparkly ...

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Overview

Here is the first book in the Princess Baby collection, followed by the picture book Princess Baby, Night-Night and the board book Princess Baby on the Go!

Poor baby, no one calls her by her real name! “I am not a buttercup, or a giggly goose. I am not a cupcake. Please don’t call me Little Lamb, and never ever Gum Drop,” she insists. With a curtsy and a twirl, again and again our protagonist makes it abundantly clear who she is. She wears a shiny crown, a fancy dress, sparkly shoes, a velvet cape, and glittery jewels. There are more clues too—she dances with princes, has perfect manners, and makes sure that everyone in her kingdom is happy. Her persistence pays off in the end, and even the youngest readers will be cheering, “Princess Baby!”

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

The curly-haired and clearly much-adored young heroine is sick and tired of people calling her "Cupcake," "Giggly Goose," "Missy Muffin" and other such sobriquets. After all, her "real name"-and the book's title-should be obvious from her shiny crown (it glitters on the book jacket), or her wand, or her innate sense of noblesse oblige ("I have perfect manners... and make sure that everyone in my kingdom is happy"). Katz's (Counting Kisses) characters are the very definition of pert. They have big round heads and tiny cute eyes, and they frolic on pastel backgrounds of polka dots, clouds and flowers; even the human beings looks like plush toys. Toddler girls just discovering the joys of dress-up should find this as enticing as a glittery petticoat, although the same idea received more astute treatment this past fall in Karma Wilson and Christa Unzner's Princess Me. Ages 1-5. (Jan.)

Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information
Children's Literature
AGERANGE: Ages 3 mo. to 4.

"Why doesn't anyone ever call me by my REAL name?" asks the little girl. She is not Cupcake or Little Lamb or Buttercup. It is always "time for breakfast, Giggly Goose," she complains. "But I am not a buttercup or a giggly goose. I am not a cupcake." She politely requests to be called by her real name. "You'll know me by my shiny crown, my fancy dress and, of course, my royal wand. I am PRINCESS BABY!" The book will be a bit too pink, sparkly, and girly for parents who are hoping to avoid the whole princess thing, and the girl really is a bit obnoxious--but little kids will eat it right up. The painted and drawn illustrations are cute and funny. Really, I feel like a bit of a crank for complaining; it is a sweet book. Reviewer: Sara Lorimer

School Library Journal

PreS- This typically self-absorbed toddler is not amused by the pet names she is called-Buttercup, Cupcake, or Little Lamb. She is greeted each day with endearing phrases such as, "Time for breakfast, Giggly Goose" or "How's my Sweet Gumdrop today?" But as she romps around the house in her floral pajamas, the audience will soon realize her preferred name as she dons her golden crown and glittery jewels. Baby joyously leaps across a spread with clothes a-flying. Katz has drawn the human and stuffed-animal characters with perfectly rounded heads, and she uses other softly curving lines in rendering motions such as a curtsey and arm gestures. The predominate color is fuchsia, while other bright hues complement the rosy tones. The cover attracts attention because the crown and shoes are done in a glittery gold. Toddlers will ask for repeated readings of this cheerful view of a youngster's world.-Blair Christolon, Prince William Public Library System, Manassas, VA

Copyright 2008 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature - Vicki Coleman
This adorable board book is about a cute imaginative little girl. This book begins by telling you some of the "names" people call this little girl, names she points out that don't fit her at all. She would like everyone to call her by her "real name" which in her eyes is Princess Baby. She even goes on to point out all the things that will help you to identify her as Princess Baby. She will tell you which accessories, actions, and mannerisms show you that she is Princess Baby. This book is perfect to read to little ones. The vibrant colorful pictures in this book capture a little ones' attention while looking at the pages and being read to. The illustrations are age appropriate colored hand drawings and add a great deal to the story.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780375841194
  • Publisher: Random House Children's Books
  • Publication date: 1/8/2008
  • Series: Princess Baby Series
  • Pages: 32
  • Sales rank: 175,812
  • Age range: 1 - 5 Years
  • Product dimensions: 9.25 (w) x 9.27 (h) x 0.40 (d)

Meet the Author

Karen Katz is the author and illustrator of numerous books for children, including Counting Kisses, Counting Christmas, Daddy Hugs, Mommy Hugs, Where’s Baby’s Mommy? and Toes, Ears and Nose. Her bestselling book is, Where’s Baby’s Bellybutton? She lives in New York City.

Biography

From painting and sculpture to quiltmaking and costume design, Karen Katz has been making art in one form or another all her life. But it was not until she and her husband adopted a baby from Guatemala that she considered a career in children's books. Published in 1997, her debut picture book, Over the Moon, told the story of one adoptive family's happy beginnings in a country far away. Since then, Katz has gone on to create many award-winning picture, board, and novelty books that capture the joys of childhood in simple storylines, vibrant colors, and winsome illustrations. Some include count-down elements (Counting Kisses, Ten Tiny Tickles) or interactive features (Where Is Baby's Belly Button?, Peek-A-Baby); still others introduce holiday traditions (My First Kwanzaa, My First Chinese New Year) or reinforce good habits, manners, or behavior (Excuse Me!, No Biting!, I Can Share).

Perhaps the secret to Katz's success (besides the undeniable appeal of her signature round-headed babies!) can be summed up in this quote taken directly from the author/artist's website: "When an idea for a story pops into my head, I ask these questions: Will a child want to read this book? Will parents want to read this book with their children? Will this book make a child laugh? Will this book make a parent and child feel something? Is there something visual here that will hold a child's interest? Will a child see something in a different way after reading this book? If the answer to any of those questions is 'yes,' then I know I'm on the right track."

Good To Know

Katz explains the difference between designing picture books and board books in this way:
Picture books usually have more words in them but they tell more of a narrative story. Board books are usually simpler. They are generally 6 spreads and are about one concept. When I create a board book, I try to make something that is very interactive for the baby, with flaps and pull tabs and lots of surprises. Board books are a perfect size for a baby's hand to hold and touch. Babies can have an experience all by them selves with a good board book and can also have a good lap-time experience with a mommy or daddy or caregiver. Picture books take a little more care since the pages can rip. With a board book, you can throw it in a stroller, chew on the corners and even wipe off mashed peas.

Katz has received numerous awards for her work, including:

  • Smithsonian, People, and Parent Guide magazines Best Books designation, all 1997, all for Over the Moon
  • Bill Martin, Jr. Picture Book Award nomination, Florida Reading Association Award nomination, and Child magazine Best Book designation, all 2000, all for The Colors of Us
  • National Parenting Publications Gold Award, and Child magazine Best Book designation, both 2001, and Bank Street School Books Committee Best Book designation, 2002, all for Counting Kisses
  • Oppenheim Toy Portfolio Gold Seal Award, 2002, for Counting Kisses and Twelve Hats for Lena.
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      1. Education:
        Tyler School of Art, Philadelphia; Yale Graduate School of Art and Architecture
      2. Website:

    Customer Reviews

    Average Rating 4.5
    ( 7 )
    Rating Distribution

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    Sort by: Showing all of 7 Customer Reviews
    • Posted July 22, 2010

      more from this reviewer

      Busy, brightly colored illustrations are perfect for holding babies' and toddlers' interest.

      Princess Baby goes through her day longing to be called by her real name. There are over ten endearing nicknames that baby is called but she doesn't want to be called by those names. She wonders, "Why doesn't anyone ever call me by my REAL name?" She knows that all they have to do is pay attention and they would surely discover her real name.

      This simple little book offers a unique spin on all the pet names people have for babies and the one name that is most important - at least to this baby. The busy, brightly colored illustrations are perfect for holding babies' and toddlers' attention.

      2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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    • Anonymous

      Posted March 16, 2009

      Really cute book for a 2 yr old

      Very cute book that I bought for my daughter. It is a girly, girl book so if your daughter is a little princess she will be into this book.

      2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Posted November 14, 2008

      more from this reviewer

      Reviewed by Jennifer Wardrip, aka "The Genius" for Kids @ TeensReadToo.com

      Poor baby! She's been called everything: Cupcake, Buttercup, Little Lamb, and even Sweet Gumdrop. <BR/><BR/>Hasn't anyone noticed her shiny crown, fancy dress, sparkly shoes, velvet cape, glittery jewels, or royal wand? What will it take for her parents to call her by her real name, Princess Baby? <BR/><BR/>Toddlers will be enchanted by the feel of the glittery, sparkly crown on the cover of PRINCESS BABY, and will find a reason to giggle as baby tries to set things right where her name is concerned. <BR/><BR/>Beginning readers will have no trouble with the easy text, and will have a fun time reading this alone or having it read to them as a bedtime story.

      2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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    • Anonymous

      Posted May 22, 2009

      Does anyone else think this book seems kinda, well, narcissistic?

      On the last page of this book, Princess Baby (who throughout the story reiterates her need to be refered to as 'Princess Baby', since it is her 'real name') struts down an imaginary red carpet holding her head high, with her doting parents holding her train dutifully behind her. This image brought to mind a true story of parents I knew who played a game like this with their daughter, in which she was the 'queen' and would order her parents around. It was only a game, but it carried over into real life, as the child had pretty significant problems with authority and discipline, especially when coming from her parents. I'm not saying this book will inflate your child's ego and create undisciplined, narcissistic behavior; it's colorful and cute and kids, especially girls, will probably enjoy it without reading too much into Princess Baby's actions. Still, I can't help wondering if the author noticed that Princess Baby is kinda, well, spoiled when she was writing this. I dunno, maybe I'm being too much of a crank...just some food for thought...

      0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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      Posted October 12, 2012

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      Posted January 29, 2012

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    • Anonymous

      Posted March 23, 2009

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    Sort by: Showing all of 7 Customer Reviews

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