Princess Bun Bun

Princess Bun Bun

by Richard Scrimger, Gillian Johnson
     
 

Eugene, Winifred, and baby Bun Bun are off to visit their uncle who lives in a Great Big Apartment building called Castle Apartments. Could it be a real castle? When Bun Bun, who’s just learned to walk, toddles into the elevator alone, big sister Winifred comes to the rescue. As they go up and up and up in the modern-day tower, they meet a scary monster, a witch… See more details below

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Overview

Eugene, Winifred, and baby Bun Bun are off to visit their uncle who lives in a Great Big Apartment building called Castle Apartments. Could it be a real castle? When Bun Bun, who’s just learned to walk, toddles into the elevator alone, big sister Winifred comes to the rescue. As they go up and up and up in the modern-day tower, they meet a scary monster, a witch, and even a beautiful princess. Or do they?

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
The star of Bun Bun's Birthday embarks on an adventure with her baby brother in Princess Bun Bun by Richard Scrimger, illus. by Gillian Johnson. They accidentally climb aboard the elevator in "Uncle Dave's" new building, the "Castle Apartments." (May) Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
School Library Journal
PreS-K-The family from Bun Bun's Birthday (Tundra, 2001)-Winifred, Eugene, their baby sister, and their parents-is going to visit Uncle Dave in his new home in the Castle Apartments. Eugene wonders whether there will be juice and a TV. Winifred's vision is triggered by the word "castle," and, as they approach the building, she conjures up a moat or a guard with a sword. In the lobby, Bun Bun toddles off by herself into an open elevator, and her sister hurries in, too. She desperately pushes buttons, and as the elevator doors open and close on different floors, she imagines that she sees a monster, a witch, and a princess. Johnson's humorous watercolor illustrations show that Winifred is really seeing a dog on a leash, a cleaning woman with a broom, and a stylishly dressed young woman. The girls are rescued when their uncle appears and tells them that the only princesses in the building are Princess Winifred and Princess Bun Bun. The story and illustrations evoke warm family relationships and tell a simple adventure of everyday life. Because the text is lengthy, the book might be better appreciated one-on-one.-Adele Greenlee, Bethel College, St. Paul, MN Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
What begins as a visit to Uncle Dave's new condominium, turns into an almost-magical adventure at the Castle Apartments. Winifred is the imaginative one, fervently hoping "the castle" comes complete with a moat and a spiky door. Eugene, her brother, would be happy with a mere television. Brenda, lovingly referred to as Bun Bun, has just begun toddling and it is her curiosity that sets the plot in motion. While their parents are busy with the doorman, Bun Bun steps into the elevator with Winifred hurrying after. The doors close. Trapped in the elevator, Bun Bun begins to cry while Winifred tries to comfort her as she's seen Mommy do. Three times the doors open on the wrong floor and each time they meet with a different character befitting inhabitants of a castle. There's a monster, a witch, and then a princess. The illustrations let the reader in on the real identity of the apartment occupant. The monster, for example, is an eager spotted dog. At last the hapless two meet the knight, in this case Uncle Dave, who tops off the occasion with a royal surprise. Scrimger and Johnson first combined their talents when they introduced these characters in Bun Bun's Birthday (not reviewed). Drawn with humor, the artwork supplements the tale by illuminating half the story and adorns each page with willowy ink and watercolor pictures. This is a light but involving read that nicely portrays how a child can affect her environment for it is Winifred's aplomb and fancy that keeps the situation from turning panicky. (Picture book. 3-6)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780887765438
Publisher:
Tundra
Publication date:
03/28/2002
Pages:
24
Product dimensions:
8.60(w) x 8.60(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
3 - 6 Years

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