Princess in Training

Princess in Training

4.0 1
by Tammi Sauer, Joe Berger
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions


"Princess power saves the day in a humorous antidote to pretty in pink." —Kirkus Reviews

Princess Viola is great at skateboarding and karate-chopping, but she’s lousy at the royal wave, walk, and waltz. The king and queen are not pleased. What’s a princess to do? Attend the skill-polishing Camp Princess, of course. In…  See more details below

Overview


"Princess power saves the day in a humorous antidote to pretty in pink." —Kirkus Reviews

Princess Viola is great at skateboarding and karate-chopping, but she’s lousy at the royal wave, walk, and waltz. The king and queen are not pleased. What’s a princess to do? Attend the skill-polishing Camp Princess, of course. In the end, it’s a good thing Viola is made of tougher stuff. Who else will save the day when the green dragon comes along?

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Viola Louise Hassenfeffer is no idle princess: “She spent her time karate-chopping, diving into the moat, and skateboarding up and down the drawbridge.” But she also wants to make her parents happy by being prim and proper, so when she’s invited to attend a boot camp where she’ll learn “to wave, walk, and waltz just like royalty should,” she leaps at the chance. With so many feisty princess stories in circulation, readers will quickly guess that redheaded Viola flunks Propriety 101, but gets an A+ in Saving the Day. Sauer’s (Me Want Pet!) storytelling tends to be literal, but Berger’s exuberant ink line and comic-book conventions (including the use of panels and “zip! zup! zoom!” sound effects) sell the otherwise expected story. As he has proven with the Bridget Fidget books, he’s got a gift for portraying expressive, inexhaustible heroines, whether they are following their bliss (one especially spectacular scene has Viola executing a righteous one-handed handstand on her skateboard —bracelets, tiara, and all) or vanquishing a—spoiler alert—dragon. Ages 4–8. Agent: Laura Rennert, Andrea Brown Literary Agency. Illustrator’s agent: Caroline Walsh, David Higham Associates. (Oct.)
School Library Journal
K-Gr 2—Viola Louise Hassenfeffer is not an ordinary princess. She spends her time diving into the moat, skateboarding, and karate-chopping. Wanting to fit in, she immediately signs up for Camp Princess, which promises to make her the darling of her kingdom. At camp, Viola tries very hard to learn the royal wave, but the addition of a karate chop is frowned upon. During the runway portion of the Frills of Fashion, she decides to cool off with a dive into the moat and is told royalty doesn't dive. While trying to dazzle during dance lessons, she adds a bit of skateboard flair that is deemed unacceptable. Poor Viola is feeling like a failure by time the Royal Bash begins, but it turns out to be her time to shine. When a big, green dragon shows up, she gives him a solid karate chop, douses his flames with a dive into the fountain, and then skateboards circles around him until he collapses with a resounding thunk. The extraordinary princess then becomes the darling of her kingdom just as she is. The illustrations kick this familiar theme up a notch. Berger's comic-book-like panels for the action sequences are exciting, and one of Viola's karate chops is practically 3-D. Oversize action words like "Hi-Yah!," "Zip! Zup! Zoom!," and "Splash!" round out the fun. Observant readers will get a glimpse of the green dragon before his grand entrance. A good choice for a "be-true-to-yourself"- themed storytime or for anyone looking for a fun read.—Catherine Callegari, Gay-Kimball Library, Troy, NH
Kirkus Reviews
Karate-chopping, moat-splashing and skateboard-zooming are much more fun for Princess Viola than tiara-wearing and hand-waving. When the royal post delivers a letter of invitation to attend Camp Princess, Viola is keen to try it, for who would not want to be "the darling" of one's kingdom, as Madame Gertrude, the Director, promises. Alas, though the Princess tries hard at all things properly royal, she reverts to true form and enhances her actions by chopping instead of waving, splashing instead of walking and zooming instead of waltzing. Is all lost? Never! The night of the camp's Royal Bash, Viola employs her skills to best a hungry, bright-green dragon and returns home in triumph. Sauer, who likes spunk in her characters, writes with brisk humor, employing action verbs to great effect. Berger, an animator and cartoonist, uses a mix of pencil, wax crayon, brush pen and Photoshop to create art with comic-book flair, complete with panels and exploding fonts. His palette of hot pink, lavender, blue and orange pulsates with energy. And, necessary for any princess outing, a generous dollop of glitter adorns the cover. Princess power saves the day in a humorous antidote to pretty in pink. (Picture book. 3-7)
From the Publisher

"Princess power saves the day in a humorous antidote to pretty in pink."
Kirkus

"A good choice for a 'be-true-to-yourself'-themed storytime or for anyone looking for a fun read."
School Library Journal

Read More

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780152065997
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date:
10/02/2012
Edition description:
First Edition
Pages:
40
Sales rank:
1,141,075
Product dimensions:
9.30(w) x 11.00(h) x 0.20(d)
Lexile:
540L (what's this?)
Age Range:
4 - 7 Years

Meet the Author

Tammi Sauer, a former teacher and library media specialist, is the author of many popular picture books, including Nugget and Fang, illustrated by Michael Slack, and Princess in Training, illustrated by Joe Berger. She lives in Edmond, Oklahoma. Visit her website at  www.tammisauer.com.

Joe Berger is an author and illustrator of many popular picture books, as well as an animator and cartoonist. He lives in Bristol, England, with his family.Visit his website at www.joeberger.co.uk.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Princess in Training 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
ldyhawc More than 1 year ago
I bought htis book for my niece for Christmas, I purchased it because it was not the traditional Disney Princess that seem to over run all little girl books these days. I love that the Princess is true to herself and even though placed in a situation where she is being asked to conform she shows being different can be a benefit The mix of comic book out takes as well as the traditional story book makes the book very appealing. .