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Princess K.I.M. and the Lie That Grew
     

Princess K.I.M. and the Lie That Grew

5.0 2
by Maryann Cocca-Leffler
 

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Kim wants the kids at her new school to like her, so she tells a teeny, tiny, bitty lie. She says her name is really “K.I.M.”—for “Katherine Isabella Marguerite”—and that she comes from a royal family! Pretty soon all the students know there is a princess in the school. Kim wears her golden tiara from dance class and a big fancy ring

Overview

Kim wants the kids at her new school to like her, so she tells a teeny, tiny, bitty lie. She says her name is really “K.I.M.”—for “Katherine Isabella Marguerite”—and that she comes from a royal family! Pretty soon all the students know there is a princess in the school. Kim wears her golden tiara from dance class and a big fancy ring she won at the arcade. Her little lie grows and grows. When a classmate invites her to a birthday party, Kim says she can’t go because her grandmother is coming to visit. But she had told the kids her grandmother was a queen. Now they all want to meet the queen. Kim is in a real bind; her lie has grown too big and it’s about ready to explode!

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
Kim is very nervous about starting in a new school. She fears the other kids will not like her. So when she learns that there is another girl named Kim, she announces that her name is K.I.M. for Katherine Isabella Marguerite and that she is from a royal family. This gets her lots of welcome attention, so her fanciful story grows. But she has told everyone that her grandmother is the queen, so when she announces that grandmother is coming to visit, Kim does not know what to do. Fortunately, Grandma Betty and Kim work it all out. Kim decides that it does not pay to lie and that she is really happy just being plain Kim. The cartoony characters behave like typical kids in a variety of spaces from small vignettes to streams across a double page. The text varies in size and placement, mostly in blocks of a few short lines, but becoming large and sweeping as Kim's imaginative stories are told. Glitter adds to the appeal of saucy Kim on the jacket while the end pages overflow with the trappings of royalty. Readers will be amused by Kim while they understand her predicament and perhaps learn a lesson. Reviewer: Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
School Library Journal

PreS-Gr 2

On her first day at a new school, Kim wants to distinguish herself from a classmate with the same name, so she tells a "teeny, tiny, bitty lie," saying that Kim is actually an acronym for Katherine Isabella Marguerite. After her teacher calls it a name befitting royalty, the rumor spreads that Kim is a princess and she goes along with the charade. Everyone is hypnotized except Jason, who doesn't believe Kim's story. Then, Kim is put in a difficult situation when her grandmother, the supposed queen, comes to town. In the end, a wonderful lesson is learned and a new friendship is formed. The brightly colored artwork brings the story to life. Several scenes show Kim's classmates giving her the royal treatment by covering puddles, carrying things for her, and getting her autograph. Varying layouts effectively convey the action: larger paintings depict the entire class, while smaller ones capture private moments. A row of faces presented in a diagonal stripe across a spread neatly shows a lie being passed from person to person. Fans of Jane O'Connor's "Fancy Nancy" (HarperCollins) are sure to enjoy this tale.-Lori A. Guenthner, Baltimore County Public Library, Randallstown, MD

Kirkus Reviews
Nervous new girl at school tells a lie that seems to get bigger and bigger. On her first day in a new school, Kim Worthington is introduced to the whole class by the teacher. When another girl cries out that her name is Kim, everybody laughs, and the new Kim finds herself weaving a tall tale of her life as Princess Katherine Isabella Marguerite. Her classmates seem so fascinated and attentive that Kim can't own up to her lie but gets in deeper and deeper instead. Then on the Monday-morning school bus, the cheers turn to jeers when the other students, having watched Kim's house over the weekend, accuse her of being "a FAKE!" It takes a surprise intervention from Grandma to save the day and pave the way for Kim to set things right. Cocca-Leffler's sunny illustrations and the book's playful design help its valuable lesson go down easy. Classmate Jason's skeptical commentary throughout the week acts as punctuation and leads up to a smile-inducing punchline. Appealing and effective. (Picture book. 4-6)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780807541784
Publisher:
Whitman, Albert & Company
Publication date:
03/01/2009
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
565,803
Product dimensions:
10.90(w) x 8.60(h) x 0.40(d)
Lexile:
AD430L (what's this?)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

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Princess K.I.M. and the Lie That Grew 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
mpetite More than 1 year ago
Princess K.I.M. is a great book. An easy read with a great message. So relatable for children and adults alike. Who hasn't experienced a situation in which you have to keep telling lies to cover an original lie. Illustrations in the book are fantastic. Kudos to Maryann Cocca-Leffler for a great story.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
One tiny lie grows and grows until it gets too big to handle. Kim starts by telling the kids she is from royality...then she tells them that her Grandmother is the queen. Very funny- Great illustrations. In the end a great message. A must read.