Princess Kim and Too Much Truth

Princess Kim and Too Much Truth

by Maryann Cocca-Leffler
     
 

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Although she’s always been called “Princess” at home, Kim is not a real princess, so she decides, “From now on, no matter what, I’m only going to tell the truth!” She tells her dad that the pancakes are rubbery and her grandma that her new necklace looks like the slimy rocks at the bottom of the fish tank. At school

Overview

Although she’s always been called “Princess” at home, Kim is not a real princess, so she decides, “From now on, no matter what, I’m only going to tell the truth!” She tells her dad that the pancakes are rubbery and her grandma that her new necklace looks like the slimy rocks at the bottom of the fish tank. At school, she’s just as honest . . . until she learns what too much truth can do.“Cheerful spreads suit the straightforward telling as Kim reclaims her sparkly crown. Nimble purple outlines frame each character. The children’s incredulous expressions appropriately build as Kim’s outrageous bluntness thwarts any potential diplomacy. Conventional school dynamics and spirited dialogue help to make each scenario recognizable. Clearly character education, subtlety is sacrificed to purpose, but it sparkles nevertheless.” —Kirkus Reviews “This story combines the well-worn narrative of truth versus kindness with the current fad for all things princess-related and sparkly. . . . Children who love Jane O’Connor’s Fancy Nancy books or Victoria Kann’s Pinkalicious will gravitate toward the sparkly cover image of a frizzy-haired redhead tossing her crown into an overflowing box of princess paraphernalia. . . . The highlights of this package are the charming expressions of the characters and the warmth of Cocca-Leffler’s bright, amusing paintings.” —School Library Journal “Cocca-Leffler’s soothing color palette and relatable heroine deliver the lesson with good cheer.” —Publishers Weekly “Kim’s conundrum is one that young children can identify with. This volume would be a welcome addition to a classroom collection on teaching ethics and values for young children, although it would appeal mostly to girls.” —Library Media ConnectionMaryann Cocca-Leffler is the author-illustrator of many books for children including the Mr. Tanen series and the Princess Kim books. Cocca-Leffler is currently working on the first fully staged production of an award-winning stage play based on the Princess Kim books. She lives in Amherst, New Hampshire. Her website is maryanncoccaleffler.com.  

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
After a class lesson about honesty, Princess Kim (who had trouble with that topic in Princess K.I.M. and the Lie That Grew) decides to tell the truth about everything. First up: giving up her princess persona ("It was time to pack up the pink"). She also tells her father that his pancakes are "sort of rubbery," Grandma Betty that her necklace looks like "those slimy rocks from the bottom of my fishtank," and a teacher that her baby is ugly. Kim finally learns that "telling the truth doesn't mean you say everything you're thinking," and that pointing out positive attributes is a way to tell the truth without hurting feelings. Cocca-Leffler's soothing color palette and relatable heroine deliver the lesson with good cheer. Ages 4–8. (Mar.)
Children's Literature - Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
Kim takes her teacher's lesson on honesty very seriously. Although her family has always called her "princess," she knows that she's really not one, so "it was time to pack up the pink." She also decides that from now on she will tell only the truth. Unfortunately, this means hurting her father by dismissing his pancakes and her Grandma Betty by berating her new necklace. She insults and wounds her friends, classmates, and teachers with the truth. Finally Violet gives Kim a way out: She should just say one single good thing. That would not be hurtful, and it would not be lying. Kim even decides that she can pretend to be a princess sometimes. On the glitter-trimmed jacket, Kim is tossing her "princess" things into a box. Some of them float across the end pages, while Kim is bedecking herself with some on the title page. The scenes are simply painted with cartoon-y characters and minimal props; but the emotions are clearly portrayed. While visually funny, there is a message about the truth and when and how to use it. Reviewer: Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 1—This story combines the well-worn narrative of truth versus kindness with the current fad for all things princess-related and sparkly. "Princess Kim" learns from her teacher that "sometimes telling the truth is hard, but it's the right thing to do." She immediately begins to apply this lesson to everything she says and does, putting away her princess things because she's not a "real" princess and giving her honest opinion about her dad's pancakes, her friend's new rain boots, and a classmate's artwork. When Kim tells a visiting teacher that she thinks her newborn baby is the ugliest she's ever seen, Kim's teacher finally steps in. "Telling the truth doesn't mean you say everything you're thinking," she clarifies. Kim quickly repairs her damaged relationships by thinking of comments that are both nice and true and decides that she's ready to play at being a princess again. Adults won't find anything new here, but for some youngsters the message will be fresh. Children who love Jane O'Connor's "Fancy Nancy" books (HarperCollins) or Victoria Kann's Pinkalicious (HarperCollins, 2006) will gravitate toward the sparkly cover image of a frizzy-haired redhead tossing her crown into an overflowing box of princess paraphernalia (though the interior illustrations of Kim's self-imposed exile may disappoint these fans of fanciness). The highlights of this package are the charming expressions of the characters and the warmth of Cocca-Leffler's bright, amusing paintings. Purchase where demand for princess stories is high. Otherwise, steer readers to Patricia C. McKissack's The Honest-to-Goodness Truth (S & S, 2000).—Jayne Damron, Farmington Community Library, MI

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781480485587
Publisher:
Whitman, Albert & Company
Publication date:
02/11/2014
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
371,122
File size:
11 MB
Note:
This product may take a few minutes to download.
Age Range:
6 - 9 Years

Meet the Author

Maryann Cocca-Leffler is the author-illustrator of many books for children including the Mr. Tanen series and the Princess Kim books. Cocca-Leffler is currently working on the first fully staged production of an award-winning stage play based on the Princess Kim books. She lives in Amherst, New Hampshire. Her website is maryanncoccaleffler.com. 

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