Princess Pig

Princess Pig

by Eileen Spinelli, Tim Bowers
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

Princess? Pig? Both? A crown may not be the perfect accessory for an adorable pig.

One day a sash from a local beauty pageant blows across the farm and lands right on Pig, who takes it as a sign. “I must be a princess,” she squeals. Pony disagrees, but all the other animals in the barnyard are happy to recognize her new title. Pig is delighted

…  See more details below

Overview

Princess? Pig? Both? A crown may not be the perfect accessory for an adorable pig.

One day a sash from a local beauty pageant blows across the farm and lands right on Pig, who takes it as a sign. “I must be a princess,” she squeals. Pony disagrees, but all the other animals in the barnyard are happy to recognize her new title. Pig is delighted to learn that princesses are treated to pretty princess pies, decadent bubble baths, fluffy pillows, and soothing bedtime lullabies.

But there is a cost to the grandeur. There are many things that princesses aren’t allowed to do—like sleep late, or roll in the mud, or attend parties in the barn hosted by the common folk. Maybe Pony was right when he said, “It’s a fine thing to be a pig, if a pig is what you are.”

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Kathleen Karr
One fine country parade afternoon Pig is gifted with a blown-away "Princess" sash. Being a pig of simple mind, she sets out to become one . . . but apparently it takes more than a sash to make it so. Goat is of the opinion that royalty requires a crown, Cow a golden necklace, and Rooster a good smell. Having acquired these attributes, Pig runs the package past Pony, the only barnyard skeptic. Pony refuses to be swayed: Pig is still a pig. Will common sense win the day? Eileen Spinelli's cautionary tale about the perils of celebrity should be more than welcome in this era of "princess" overkill. Her simple narrative and comfortable dialogue are pleasantly illustrated by Tim Bowers's colored pencil and watercolor images of homey animals lolling around in the perfect Freddy the Pig, Upstate New York kind of farm. Reviewer: Kathleen Karr
School Library Journal

PreS-Gr 2

In this lighthearted tale with an underlying message about being oneself, a pig suffers dreams of grandeur. Asleep in her mud hole, she is pleasantly surprised when the wind drapes a sash proclaiming "Princess" around her shoulders. "Am I a princess?" she asks her fellow barnyard animals. The addition of a crown (a cast-off china tea cup), a gold necklace (a daisy chain), and a sweet-smelling scent (honeysuckle vines) convinces Goat, Cow, and Rooster that the answer is yes. Pig commandeers a tractor seat for a royal throne, lunches on the farmer's pie cooling on the windowsill, and luxuriates in a bubble bath. Pony, however, disagrees, continually reminding her, "you are just a pig." Princess Pig ignores him, until she discovers that, as royalty, she is not invited to "a regular old party" in the barn. Finally, she gets the message and at Pony's urging joins her comrades, dancing into the night. Bowers colored-pencil and watercolor artwork builds on Spinelli's smoothly told story, creating amusing expressions for the animals and funny scenes about Princess Pig's flirtation with the royal life. While not a primary purchase, this is a worthwhile read-aloud that offers ample discussion opportunities.-Barbara Elleman, Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art, Amherst, MA

Kirkus Reviews
When a freak wind deposits the Picawash County Pickle Princess's sash on Pig, she suddenly begins to wonder if she really might be a princess. Goat points out that she doesn't have a crown; Pig gets one (a frilly tea cup with a gold rim). Cow says she needs a golden necklace; Pig makes one from daisies. Rooster tells her she doesn't smell like a princess; a roll in the honeysuckle takes care of that. In the end, only Pony holds out in his belief that she is not a royal. Soon, Princess Pig finds the rigors of princesshood tiresome: hot, boring sittings for portraits, no rolling in the cool mud and, worst of all, no regular old parties with her friends. When Pony tells Pig one last time that she's just a pig (and there is nothing wrong with BEING a pig,) it sinks in, and she joins the party. Spinelli's story about embracing your true self is a real winner. Bower's colored-pencil illustrations show expressively silly (and regal) animals in a bright, friendly farmyard. A great addition to storytime collections. (Picture book. 4-8)

Read More

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780375845710
Publisher:
Random House Children's Books
Publication date:
06/09/2009
Pages:
40
Product dimensions:
8.70(w) x 11.10(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
3 - 7 Years

Meet the Author

Eileen Spinelli is the author of almost fifty books for young readers. She lives with her husband, author Jerry Spinelli, in eastern Pennsylvania. Visit Eileen on the Web at www.eileenspinelli.com.

Tim Bowers has illustrated more than twenty books. You can visit him on the Web at www.timbowers.com.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >