Princess Pigsty
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Princess Pigsty

5.0 1
by Cornelia Funke, Kerstin Meyer
     
 

The fourth picture book by literary sensation Funke and celebrated illustrator Meyer; a modern-day, girl-powered, fairy-tale-in-reverse!

One morning Princess Isabella throws her crown out the window--it's BORING being a princess, she declares. When she steadfastly refuses to fetch her crown from the fishpond, her father, the king, puts his royal foot down. "Off

Overview

The fourth picture book by literary sensation Funke and celebrated illustrator Meyer; a modern-day, girl-powered, fairy-tale-in-reverse!

One morning Princess Isabella throws her crown out the window--it's BORING being a princess, she declares. When she steadfastly refuses to fetch her crown from the fishpond, her father, the king, puts his royal foot down. "Off to the pigsty with you!" he commands--and Isabella couldn't be happier about her punishment! Because while plain old princesses spend all their time primping and smiling and stifling yawns--yuckety-yuk!-- REAL girls get to peel onions, pick blackberries, and sometimes even sleep outside with the pigs.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
As they did in The Princess Knight, Funke and Meyer once again skewer the princess stereotype. While Isabella leads a pampered life that others can only dream of-waited on hand and foot, with someone to blow her nose for her and curl her hair-it's the royal gal's worst nightmare. "I am tired of being a princess! It's boring, boring, boring!" she bemoans one day. Servants drawn with eyes and mouths clamped tightly shut further underscore a life of repetition and conformity. Funke portrays her heroine with a fiercely independent streak, in direct contrast to Isabella's two older sisters, who are horrified when she tosses her crown into the goldfish pond. Even the king's entrance does not dissuade Isabella from her wish to try out ordinary things. Much to readers' amusement, the monarch's various punishments in the kitchen or pigsty only strengthen her desire (after her banishment to the kitchen for three days, Isabella asks her exasperated father, "Did you know that cream is made from milk?"). The king, however, appreciates his daughter's spunk: a pleasing parting image depicts father and daughter leaving the pigsty, hand in hand, bound for the castle with a new mutual respect. This charming feminist fairytale illustrates that happily-ever-after can mean different things to different people. Ages 4-8. (Apr.) Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature - Sharon Salluzzo
Bored from being waited on by footmen and ladies-in-waiting and not being allowed to climb trees or have fun, Isabella, the youngest of three princesses, tosses her crown into the goldfish pond. When Isabella refuses to retrieve her crown, her father the king sends her to the kitchen to peel the potatoes and polish the pans. When she still refuses to get her crown, he sends her to the pigsty. Isabella, however, is happy and she is learning many new things. When her father realizes this, he and Isabella come to an agreement. Funke's droll story is amusingly illustrated. Meyer's marvelous use of line gives just the right amount of exaggeration to the pictures. From prim, pampered princesses to the literary pigs in their sty, readers will find something to chuckle about. Funke has a good message here: it is okay to be a princess if that is what you want to be, but for real fun get out and learn and do things yourself.
Kirkus Reviews
This author/illustrator team once again embarks upon a tale of an obstreperous princess. Life is boring for Princess Isabella. She's tired of fancy dresses, having someone else blow her nose and smiling for hours on end. Enough-she chucks her crown out the window where it lands in the fishpond. When she refuses to retrieve it, her father the King punishes her by sending her to the pigsty. Surprise! Isabella is happy as, well, "a pig in mud!" She scratches the pigs' bristly hides, feeds them and cleans out the sty. The backfire works; the King caves, fishes out her crown and consents to letting her do as she wishes. Sketchy cartoon illustrations ham up the humor, and kids will be rooting for the princess. Occasionally, bold type helps to emphasize words and bring the text to life: "crumbs, scratch, boring, yuckety yuck, pigsty," and, of course, "stink" stand out on the page. A plucky princess in yucky muck is good and dirty fun. (Picture book. 4-7)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780439885546
Publisher:
Scholastic, Inc.
Publication date:
04/01/2007
Pages:
24
Product dimensions:
10.74(w) x 8.76(h) x 0.36(d)
Lexile:
AD760L (what's this?)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Brief Biography

Hometown:
Los Angeles, CA
Date of Birth:
December 10, 1958
Place of Birth:
Dorsten, Germany
Education:
University of Hamburg

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Princess Pigsty 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Love princess pigsty