Princess Sultana's Daughters

( 58 )

Overview

Readers of PRINCESS were gripped by Jean Sasson's powerful indictment of women's lives behind the veil. Now, in the compelling sequel, Jean Sasson and Princess Sultana turn the spotlight on Sultana's two teenage daughters, Maha and Amani.

As second-generation members of the royal family who have benefited from Saudi oil wealth, Maha and Amani are surrounded by untold ...
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Overview

Readers of PRINCESS were gripped by Jean Sasson's powerful indictment of women's lives behind the veil. Now, in the compelling sequel, Jean Sasson and Princess Sultana turn the spotlight on Sultana's two teenage daughters, Maha and Amani.

As second-generation members of the royal family who have benefited from Saudi oil wealth, Maha and Amani are surrounded by untold opulence and luxury from the day they were born. And yet, they are stifled by the unbearably restrictive lifestyle imposed on them, driving them to desperate measures.

Throughout, Sultana and Sasson never tire of their quest to expose the injustices which society levels against women. Princess Sultana once more strikes a chord among all women who are lucky enough to have the freedom to speak out for themselves.

The complete Princess trilogy is also available for the first time in digital. For the 3-in-1 ebook, please visit http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-complete-princess-trilogy-jean-sasson/1113767111?ean=2940015924985

PRAISE FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER PRINCESS:

"Absolutely riveting and profoundly sad..." --People

"A chilling story...a vivid account of an air-conditioned nightmare..." --Entertainment Weekly

"Must-reading for anyone interested in human rights." --USA Today

"Shocking...candid...sad, sobering, and compassionate..." --San Francisco Chronicle
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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Sasson's sequel to Princess: A True Story of Life Behind the Veil is another page-turner related by "Princess Sultana."' A member of the royal family of Saudi Arabia, Sultana now is married to a progressive prince, but this privileged status does not protect her or her two daughters from the country's repressive laws against women. Though a devout Muslim, Sultana believes the entrenched male power structure has perverted religious doctrine to justify veiling women and depriving them of basic civil liberties.

The lack of opportunity to forge equal relationships with men before and after marriage, Sultana argues, is why one of her daughters became fanatically religious and the other suffered a mental breakdown. This eye-opening account is limited to life among the royals rather than a critique of Saudi Arabian society, although Sultana describes the brutal custom of female circumcision practiced by the poor.

Kirkus Reviews
It is a mark of great courage that Sultana decided to continue her story.
Today
Explosive...
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780967673752
  • Publisher: Windsor-Brooke Books
  • Publication date: 1/1/2010
  • Pages: 256
  • Sales rank: 232,255
  • Product dimensions: 5.57 (w) x 8.42 (h) x 0.71 (d)

Meet the Author


Please see Jean Sasson's Bio from PRINCESS, A True Story of Life Behind the Veil in Saudi Arabia.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 58 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(24)

4 Star

(20)

3 Star

(7)

2 Star

(3)

1 Star

(4)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 58 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 22, 2002

    15 year old muslim girl

    This book was pretty good but I'm kind of disappointed in the way it portrays all middle eastern women as opressed and being forced to cover. I am a 15 year old arab girl who is a practicing muslim. I wear the traditional head covering and I was not forced to wear it as most people might think; i chose to wear it myself. The story of Princess sultana is heartbreaking but i know many Saudi women who have had wonderful childhoods and haven't been forced to marry. There are many independent Saudi women who are doctors, lawyers, and are very educated and not at all opressed by their husbands or fathers or brothers. I think this book stereotypes all Saudi men as arrogant and inhumane. Don't get me wrong, there are some men that treat women as described in Princess Sultana's biography. This book also does not show the true face of Islam which teaches its followers to respect women. Nevertheless, the story of Sultana is heartbreaking and I can't begin to imagine how painful it must have been for her. For anyone who reads this, please remember this is the story of one woman, not all have been put through what this woman has gone through.

    18 out of 25 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 23, 2003

    As a single woman who worked in Saudi, I can relate

    Although my experiences weren't as horrendous, I had to fight off men who thought any single woman, especially a Westerner , was fair prey. I met and socialized with women in the Royal family and was amazed at the lengths they had to go to and the subversiveness they devised to live a somewhat free life-. I thanked my lucky stars everyday I had not been born into their gilded gage lives. I could escape and go home to the U.S.

    8 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 26, 2009

    I have experienced palace life in Saudi Arabia

    Jean Sasson must be lauded for the great service she has done for the women of Saudi Arabia by exposing what the men of Saudi Arabia want to supress. Saudi Arabia is a different place depending on which city you live in. Jeddah, a port with a long tradition of pilgrims visiting, is a very different place to Riyadh, the capital. There is less opression in Jeddah than in Riyadh, and life out in the remote areas must be even worse. In the Eastern province the people are different again, but the rules are still the same. The royals have cut a deal with the religious people, but the royals live a free life of alcohol and free sex in Saudi. There is no law for the royals as I discovered firsthand when I took the king's uncle to court after his son, Salman, stole from me.
    I lived in a palace in Riyadh as my Interior Design business partner was a Saudi princess. I enjoyed the parties (all female) and the company of these young Princesses.....I was older than them. These were beautiful young girls in gilded cages......they had big cars heavily curtained, and they moved only with other women or the male members of their family. The princesses have cars and drivers to visit each other, but the women most in need were those unable to afford a driver. For the ordinary woman in Riyadh life is very difficult. A womans lot is very sad in Saudi Arabia as she is first the property of her father, and then, after marriage, the property of her husband....and her status depends on producing a male child. If her husband wants to take other women she has no control over it.
    In my own situation I was financially put upon by the family I lived with and all my worldy posessions were stolen from me. I left Saudi Arabia after over two years there in the clothes I stood up in only. The Saudi Minister of Foreign Affairs was involved in my case but unable to help in the end. It was the most terrifying ordeal I have ever experienced. I plan to write a book about it in the future.
    I saw the Phillipine maids being treated so badly, and some had to take refuge in their embassy. People from Pakistan and India were also treated with no respect by their Saudi employers.
    Bravo Jean Sasson....the women of Saudi Arabia needed you to tell their story.

    7 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 27, 2011

    Excellent

    Easy read and very interesting

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 21, 2000

    Still successful...

    I read Princess and then bought this book, Daughters. I love the way the life of Sultana is unfolding and how we learn about her children. Most of all, I am amazed at the way the author Jean Sasson is able to keep this story fresh and exciting. It is such a tragic topic, yet, I found myself laughing in spots and highly enjoying the writing of this very talented author. It must have been very difficult to write such a page turner. I have always heard that the easier it is to read, the harder it was to write. If that is true, this book must have been very difficult for the author. I can't wait to read more from this writer...

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 28, 2000

    gripping and touching.

    Princess Sultana's Daughters is a wonderful book that tells the world of the second stage of Sultana's life. it is just as gripping as the first on and well worth reading because it really makes you appreciate your rights as an american.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 22, 2012

    Recommend

    I thought it was educational.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 16, 2012

    Check it out

    Another excellent book - held my interest to the end. I think everyone should read the Princess books (3). They would be glad they live in America and not Saudi.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 23, 2008

    Not reflecting the facts of muslim society

    The book is misleading, portraying the entire Saudi female society as opressed. While you will find such incidents in Saudi, you will find it elsewhere in the world, and at the same time, like you will find justice in other parts of the world, you will find justice in Saudi. The book is biased, and misleading

    2 out of 14 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 16, 2008

    not as good as the other 2 books

    this is the last one i read of the trilogy and was a little disappointed. the other 2 were so much better. i was more interested in the complicated and glamorous lives of the saudi women than all the never-ending details of the rituals of the islamic religion that were in this book. i understand that religion is the center of their lives, but i was bored while reading endless pages about the pilgrimage and the details of everything that occured there. if i wanted to learn about the religion, i would have read an entirely different book. it was the weakest of the 3.

    2 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 14, 2002

    The wild ride of the Princess continues!!

    If you've read 'Princess',you have no choice but to read this one. If only to find out if Princess Sultana will find a balance between her Royal heritage and raising her daughters with some element of self esteem. This reads better than any fiction novel.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 5, 2002

    Princess Sultana's Daughters

    After reading PRINCESS, every reader will go on to DAUGHTERS. The story of Sultana is too compelling not to do so. This book is better than the first one as I felt the story was not as 'angry.' I discovered much more of value about Muslim women in this book. In light of 9/11, every non-Muslim should read this book as it creates such understanding of the Muslim culture. You see the good, and the bad. Although the good outweighs the bad, the bad is BAD... It brought me to new understanding about the Afghan situation and the reason the Bush Whitehouse is making such an issue of the 'Woman's Issue.' Frankly, I think all of Jean Sasson's books should be required reading at all levels. You come away after having a good read with a LOT of knowledge of other cultures and other lives... I highly recommend this book to you, another reader.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 15, 2001

    Princess Sultana's Daughters

    This second in the Princess Trilogy is highly readable and enjoyable, although you may get angry at some of the stories. Unfortunately, I believe this book is based on truth. I wish it were not so... There are three books and you will want to read them all although each book does stand on its on. I think the author did a wonderful job at writing about such a subject yet in a really entertainly manner. Some of my friends wonder if Sultana really exists, and I believe that she does, but even if she does not, you know that someone in Saudi Arabia lives a similar life. Don't miss this series of books. You will miss something very important if you do.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 10, 2001

    what peace?

    how can the writer of 2-22 possibly say they live in peace? and was the writer a man or a woman? if male, of course you would defend a country where you are given absolute supremecy, if a female, you must have been blind to the truth. and sultana's mother-in-law tried to save her marriage by cursing the other woman, not through absence. I would urge the 2-22 to return to saudi arabia and ask the women there how much say they have in their lives, and then write another message here.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 10, 2001

    Eye opening

    I read this book for a geography project for school. At first I thought it would be another boring book about the Saudi Arabian culture. It turned out to be very fascinating and I really enjoyed it. It had an interesting plot that any girl can relate to. I love how Jean Sasson can take a real life story and turn it into an amazing novel about growing up in a foreign country. Princess Sultana's Daughters is an eye opening story that makes us realize that life is different everywhere. I guess I never thought about how bad sexism and racism still is in other countries. This book helped me realize that women still have to live under men's shadows and cannot make their own decisions about things we take for granted. Their parents choose whom they will marry, their husbands choose what they will do, and it is a never-ending loop of women being told what to do. After reading this I am glad I grew up in a country where I was equal to a man. This book is by far the best I have ever read in my life. I recommend this book to anyone who enjoys reading.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 9, 2001

    Princess

    I found the book to be exceptionally good, I give this woman credit for coming forth and revealing truth,and the horrors to what is going on it could very well cost this woman her life for revealing sooo much.Maybe the person who wrote on 2-22-00 had better reread the book. This is bondage and there is no other word for it. Perhapes the person mentioned above2-22-00 also ought to join anti-slavery grp then you will learn the truth. Princess has told all and she LIVES this life everyday and had inside information to her facts... where other people do NOT . .Bondage is FACT and documented

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 19, 2000

    Hard truths

    While not as good as 'Princess,' Sultana describes the horrors some women are subjected to in Saudi Arabia. The princess' intent is not to denounce her culture (stated repeatedly and emphatically.) She is trying to show the hypocrasy found all too often in the Arabian monarchy and throw off the status of being a second class citizin merely because of her sex. To paraphrase her, men have taken the message of Allah out of context to keep their women subserviant.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 20, 2013

    Highly recommended.

    This is a real eye opener for anyone fascinated by women's lives in other areas of the world. Told without any reservation by a princess who in her own way is attempting to bring her fellow countrywomen equal rights.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 20, 2013

    Graphic discussions on sex but worth the read.

    It is very enlightening to read about the plight of many women in the world. The bravery of the author to divulge such details is admirable. Eventual retribution awaits the men who abuse their women and their religion!!!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 13, 2012

    Recommend

    Easy book to read. The book gives you good incite into the life of a Saudi princess. Makes me very happy to live in the U.S.A.!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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