Principles of Distributed Database Systems / Edition 3

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Overview

This third edition of a classic textbook can be used to teach at the senior undergraduate and graduate levels. The material concentrates on fundamental theories as well as techniques and algorithms. The advent of the Internet and the World Wide Web, and, more recently, the emergence of cloud computing and streaming data applications, has forced a renewal of interest in distributed and parallel data management, while, at the same time, requiring a rethinking of some of the traditional techniques. This book covers the breadth and depth of this re-emerging field. The coverage consists of two parts. The first part discusses the fundamental principles of distributed data management and includes distribution design, data integration, distributed query processing and optimization, distributed transaction management, and replication. The second part focuses on more advanced topics and includes discussion of parallel database systems, distributed object management, peer-to-peer data management, web data management, data stream systems, and cloud computing. New in this Edition: • New chapters, covering database replication, database integration, multidatabase query processing, peer-to-peer data management, and web data management. • Coverage of emerging topics such as data streams and cloud computing • Extensive revisions and updates based on years of class testing and feedback Ancillary teaching materials are available.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
From the reviews of the third edition:
“This is an excellent book that provides an in-depth overview of all issues related to distributed data management. … Each chapter … ends with a conclusion that provides a nice summary and additional reflections, as well as bibliographic notes. … The book ends with an extensive list of references and an index. … Instructors of advanced database courses could use this book as a textbook. It would also interest researchers on topics related to distributed data management. I highly recommend this excellent book.” (Sergio Ilarri, ACM Computing Reviews, August, 2011)
Booknews
Introduces and explains the theory, algorithms, and methods that underlie distributed DBMS, emphasizing the principles that guide the design of such systems more than their use. Useful as a text for a one- or two-semester graduate-level course. The bibliography is extensive. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR booknews.com
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781441988331
  • Publisher: Springer New York
  • Publication date: 3/2/2011
  • Edition description: 3rd ed. 2011
  • Edition number: 3
  • Pages: 846
  • Sales rank: 500,547
  • Product dimensions: 6.40 (w) x 9.40 (h) x 2.20 (d)

Meet the Author

M. Tamer Özsu is a professor of computer science at the University of Waterloo, Canada. He has been conducting research in distributed data management for thirty years. He serves on the editorial boards of many journals and book series, and is also the co-editor-in-chief, with Ling Liu, of the Encyclopedia of Database Systems. Patrick Valduriez is a senior researcher at INRIA, France and the head of the Zenith research group pursuing research in scientific data management in distributed systems. He has also served as a professor of computer science at University Paris 6. He has authored and co-authored over 200 technical papers and several books.

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Read an Excerpt

PREFACE: PREFACE TO THE SECOND EDITION
Many things have changed since the publication of the first edition of this book in 1991. At the time, we reported projections that, by 1998, centralized database managers (DBMSs) would be an \antique curiosity" and most organizations would move towards distributed database managers. Distribution was slowly starting and "client/server" had just started to enter our daily jargon. These systems were generally multiple client/single server systems in which the distribution was mostly in terms of functionality, not data. If multiple servers were used, clients were responsible for managing the connections to these servers. Thus, transparency of access was not widely supported, and each client had to "know" the location of the required data. The distribution of data among multiple servers was very primitive; systems did not support fragmentation or replication of data. Systems of the time were \homogeneous" in that each system could manage only data that were stored in its own database, with no linkage to other repositories.

Things have changed dramatically since then. Many vendors are much closer to achieving true distribution in their development cycle. Client/server systems remain the preferred solution in many cases, but they are much more sophisticated. For example, today's client/server systems provide signicant transparency in accessing data from multiple servers, support distributed transactions to facilitate transparency, and execute queries over (horizontally) fragmented data. Further, new systems implement both synchronous and asynchronous replication protocols, and many vendors have introduced gateways to accessother databases. In addition, significant achievements have taken place in the development and deployment of parallel database servers. Object database managers have entered the marketplace and have found a niche market in some classes of applications which are inherently distributed.

In parallel with these developments in the database system front, there have been phenomenal changes in the computer networking infrastructure that supports these systems. The relatively slow (10Mbit/sec) Ethernet has been replaced as the de facto local area network standard by much faster networks (FDDI or switched Ethernet) operating at around 100Mbit/sec, and broadband networks (particularly the ATM technology) have been deployed for both local area and wide area networking. These networks, coupled with very low overhead networking protocols, such as SCI, reduce the differences between local area and wide area networks (other than latency considerations) and potentially eliminate the network as the major performance bottleneck. This, in turn, requires us to review our system development assumptions and performance tuning criteria. Use of the Internet which is basically a heterogeneous network with links of varying capacities and capabilities has exploded.

There is clearly a technology push/application pull in effect with respect to distributed DBMS development: new applications are requiring changes in DBMS capabilities, and new technological developments are making these changes possible. With these developments, it was time to prepare a revised second edition of the book. In the process, we have retained the fundamental characteristics and key features of the book as outlined in the Preface to the first edition. However, the material has been heavily edited. Every chapter has been revised some in fundamental ways, others more superficially. The major changes are the following:

1. The query processing/optimization chapters (Chapters 7{9) have been revised to focus on the techniques employed in commercial systems. New algorithms, such as randomized search strategies, are now included.

2. The transaction management chapters (Chapters 10{12) now include material on advanced transaction models and work flows.

3. Chapter 13, which focused on the relationship of distributed DBMSs and distributed operating systems, has been dropped and some of the material is incorporated into the relevant chapters.

4. The first edition contained a chapter (Chapter 15) which discussed current issues at the time parallel DBMSs, distributed knowledge-base systems (mainly deductive DBMSs), and distributed object DBMSs. In the intervening years, two of these topics have matured and become major forces in their own rights, while the third (deductive databases) has not achieved the same prominence. In this edition, we devote full chapters to parallel DBMSs (Chapter 13) and distributed object DBMSs (Chapter 14), and have dropped deductive DBMSs.

5. Following the same approach, we introduce a new chapter devoted to current issues (Chapter 16). This chapter now includes sections on data warehousing (from a distributed data management perspective), World Wide Web and databases, push-based technologies, and mobile DBMSs.

6. The chapter on multidatabase systems (Chapter 15 in the current edition) has been revised to include a discussion of general interoperability issues and distributed object platforms such as OMA/CORBA and DCOM/OLE.

We are quite satisfied with the result, which represents a compromise between our desire to address new and emerging issues, and maintain the main characteristic of the book in addressing the principles of distributed data management. Certain chapters, in particular Chapters 15 and 16, require further depth, but those will be topics of future editions.

The guide to reading the book, introduced in the Preface to the first edition, is still valid in general terms. However, we now discuss, in Chapter 3, the relationship between distributed DBMSs and the new networking technologies. Thus, this chapter no longer serves simply as background and should be read (at least the relevant sections) following Chapter 1.

We have set up a Web site to communicate with our readers. The site is at ...
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Table of Contents

Introduction.- Background.- Distributed Database Design.- Database Integration.- Data and Access Control.- Overview of Query Processing.- Query Decomposition and Data Localization.- Optimization of Distributed Queries.- Multidatabase Query Processing.- Introduction to Transaction Management.- Distributed Concurrency Control.- Distributed DBMS Reliability.- Data Replication.- Parallel Database Systems.- Distributed Object Database Management.- Peer-to-Peer Data Management.- Web Data Management.- Current Issues.- References.- Index

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Preface

PREFACE: PREFACE TO THE SECOND EDITION
Many things have changed since the publication of the first edition of this book in 1991. At the time, we reported projections that, by 1998, centralized database managers (DBMSs) would be an \\antique curiosity" and most organizations would move towards distributed database managers. Distribution was slowly starting and "client/server" had just started to enter our daily jargon. These systems were generally multiple client/single server systems in which the distribution was mostly in terms of functionality, not data. If multiple servers were used, clients were responsible for managing the connections to these servers. Thus, transparency of access was not widely supported, and each client had to "know" the location of the required data. The distribution of data among multiple servers was very primitive; systems did not support fragmentation or replication of data. Systems of the time were \\homogeneous" in that each system could manage only data that were stored in its own database, with no linkage to other repositories.

Things have changed dramatically since then. Many vendors are much closer to achieving true distribution in their development cycle. Client/server systems remain the preferred solution in many cases, but they are much more sophisticated. For example, today's client/server systems provide signicant transparency in accessing data from multiple servers, support distributed transactions to facilitate transparency, and execute queries over (horizontally) fragmented data. Further, new systems implement both synchronous and asynchronous replication protocols, and many vendors have introduced gateways toaccessother databases. In addition, significant achievements have taken place in the development and deployment of parallel database servers. Object database managers have entered the marketplace and have found a niche market in some classes of applications which are inherently distributed.

In parallel with these developments in the database system front, there have been phenomenal changes in the computer networking infrastructure that supports these systems. The relatively slow (10Mbit/sec) Ethernet has been replaced as the de facto local area network standard by much faster networks (FDDI or switched Ethernet) operating at around 100Mbit/sec, and broadband networks (particularly the ATM technology) have been deployed for both local area and wide area networking. These networks, coupled with very low overhead networking protocols, such as SCI, reduce the differences between local area and wide area networks (other than latency considerations) and potentially eliminate the network as the major performance bottleneck. This, in turn, requires us to review our system development assumptions and performance tuning criteria. Use of the Internet which is basically a heterogeneous network with links of varying capacities and capabilities has exploded.

There is clearly a technology push/application pull in effect with respect to distributed DBMS development: new applications are requiring changes in DBMS capabilities, and new technological developments are making these changes possible. With these developments, it was time to prepare a revised second edition of the book. In the process, we have retained the fundamental characteristics and key features of the book as outlined in the Preface to the first edition. However, the material has been heavily edited. Every chapter has been revised some in fundamental ways, others more superficially. The major changes are the following:

1. The query processing/optimization chapters (Chapters 7{9) have been revised to focus on the techniques employed in commercial systems. New algorithms, such as randomized search strategies, are now included.

2. The transaction management chapters (Chapters 10{12) now include material on advanced transaction models and work flows.

3. Chapter 13, which focused on the relationship of distributed DBMSs and distributed operating systems, has been dropped and some of the material is incorporated into the relevant chapters.

4. The first edition contained a chapter (Chapter 15) which discussed current issues at the time parallel DBMSs, distributed knowledge-base systems (mainly deductive DBMSs), and distributed object DBMSs. In the intervening years, two of these topics have matured and become major forces in their own rights, while the third (deductive databases) has not achieved the same prominence. In this edition, we devote full chapters to parallel DBMSs (Chapter 13) and distributed object DBMSs (Chapter 14), and have dropped deductive DBMSs.

5. Following the same approach, we introduce a new chapter devoted to current issues (Chapter 16). This chapter now includes sections on data warehousing (from a distributed data management perspective), World Wide Web and databases, push-based technologies, and mobile DBMSs.

6. The chapter on multidatabase systems (Chapter 15 in the current edition) has been revised to include a discussion of general interoperability issues and distributed object platforms such as OMA/CORBA and DCOM/OLE.

We are quite satisfied with the result, which represents a compromise between our desire to address new and emerging issues, and maintain the main characteristic of the book in addressing the principles of distributed data management. Certain chapters, in particular Chapters 15 and 16, require further depth, but those will be topics of future editions.

The guide to reading the book, introduced in the Preface to the first edition, is still valid in general terms. However, we now discuss, in Chapter 3, the relationship between distributed DBMSs and the new networking technologies. Thus, this chapter no longer serves simply as background and should be read (at least the relevant sections) following Chapter 1.

We have set up a Web site to communicate with our readers. The site is at ...
Read More Show Less

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  • Posted May 2, 2011

    Excellent textbook for a Distributed Database class

    A typical database course should cover design aspects, query processing, and transaction management. My course is structured along these lines and the book provides the coverage I need. I find all three topics: design, query processing, and transaction management, equally challenging. They all involve conceptual understanding and algorithmic depth. Generally speaking, the authors did a good job in compiling multiple research efforts into a coherent textbook. The textbook has a leading (rather simple) case study example that serves well in tying together different research efforts. At times, this effort trivializes matters and this is where I, as an instructor, should step in and provide some additional explanation. The manuscript provides a good depth in both conceptual and algorithmic solutions. The use of examples throughout improves understanding a lot, especially for undergrads. The example is mostly clear. This textbook is the only textbook I know of that provides technical depth for the area of distributed databases. This is important when teaching engineering students.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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