Principles of Gardening

Principles of Gardening

by Hugh Johnson
     
 

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Principles of Gardening is a treatise on the foundations and essential premises of gardening rather than a volume of directions; it provides the logic of the big picture rather than an inventory of details. Johnson expands the vision of the gardener beyond the minutiae of instruction books, illuminating the primal connection to nature that is the essence of gardening.…  See more details below

Overview

Principles of Gardening is a treatise on the foundations and essential premises of gardening rather than a volume of directions; it provides the logic of the big picture rather than an inventory of details. Johnson expands the vision of the gardener beyond the minutiae of instruction books, illuminating the primal connection to nature that is the essence of gardening. In the opening chapter on climate, for instance, he goes beyond an explanation of hardiness zones to explore the character of plant tenderness, the elements of climate, and the role of the gardener. In a discussion of how plants come to be cultivated by gardeners, he marvels at the horticultural niches to which different plants have been assigned. While specific information abounds - the correct distance between canes of raspberries, or how to build a garden pond - the strength of Principles of Gardening lies in the commonsense elemental advice that appears throughout.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Johnson, former gardening correspondent for the New York Times, succeeds admirably in this completely revised and updated edition of his 1979 book. Tighter prose, new photographs and a smoother layout make this both a valuable reference book and an absorbing volume for leisure reading. Rather than address planting specifics of spinach and tomatoes, Johnson discusses concepts of weather patterns and the dynamics of soil, water and light as they relate to plant growth in every climate. He emphasizes learning to work with nature and provides historical examples of how cultures as diverse as the Chinese, French and English have addressed this concept. Entire chapters are devoted to the role and selection of trees, shrubs, vines, herbs and perennials in garden designs in various climates. Charts and illustrative photos demonstrate different uses and effects of color; Johnson also suggests artful additions of structures and statuary to enhance a garden scheme. Finally, he recognizes changing trends in the modern gardenscape which, because of busier lifestyles, doubles as a play and entertainment space. Garden Book Club selection. (Feb.)
Library Journal - Library Journal
This book is encyclopedic, but it is not an encyclopedia. It treats the practice of gardening, but it is not a guide for beginners. It most closely resembles a collection of detailed essays on all aspects of gardening and, like any good collection of essays, is filled with highly personal and individual observations and suggestions. As former editor of the Royal Horticultural Society's journal, The Garden, and as former gardening correspondent for the New York Times, Johnson brings considerable experience to his writing, and his opinions are always interesting and sometimes idiosyncratic. He discusses each topic thoroughly, with history and theoretical background outweighing practical advice-though there is much of that as well. Although fully revised from the 1979 edition, this book still has a strong British slant. Many of the plants described would not survive in American gardens, but USDA zones are not included. Recommended for large gardening collections.-Daniel Starr, Museum of Modern Art, New York

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780671242732
Publisher:
Simon & Schuster Adult Publishing Group
Publication date:
11/01/1979
Pages:
272

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