Principles of Human Knowledge and Three Dialogues Between Hylas and Philonous

Principles of Human Knowledge and Three Dialogues Between Hylas and Philonous

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by George Berkeley
     
 

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Whether viewed as extreme skepticism or enlightened common sense, the writings of Berkeley are a major influence on modern philosophy. Bishop Berkeley (1685-1753) was one of the great British empirical philosophers. He believed that the existence of material objects depends on their being perceived and The Principles of Human Knowledge sets out this denial of

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Overview

Whether viewed as extreme skepticism or enlightened common sense, the writings of Berkeley are a major influence on modern philosophy. Bishop Berkeley (1685-1753) was one of the great British empirical philosophers. He believed that the existence of material objects depends on their being perceived and The Principles of Human Knowledge sets out this denial of non-mental material reality. At first his views were unfavorably received by the London intelligentsia, and the entertaining Three Dialogues between Hylas and Philonous are a clarification of the Realist argument and a response to accusations of atheism and skepticism. In the nineteenth century John Stuart Mill wrote that he considered Berkeley's work to be of "greatest philosophic genius," and it is true to say that its Immaterialism has influenced many recent philosophers.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780140432930
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
07/28/1988
Series:
Penguin Classics Series
Pages:
224
Sales rank:
409,935
Product dimensions:
5.00(w) x 7.80(h) x 0.57(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

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Principles of Human Knowledge and Three Dialogues between Hylas and Philonous 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The 'Principles of Human Knowledge' sets out to explain how the world we perceive is not actually 'real' but rather more a 'dream-like' state in which only ideas and spirits exist. This 'immaterialism' steers sceptics away from atheism and towards an enlightened view of the world through God. The 'Three Dialogues between Hylas and Philonous' details an argument between a materialist and an idealist and covers many questions regarding such a subject in an entertaining manner. I definitely recommend this book. It will perhaps be the most deep and intelligent pieces of writing that you will ever read!