The Principles of Psychology, Vol. 2

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Overview

Volume 1 of the famous long course, complete and unabridged. Stream of thought, time perception, memory, experimental methods — these are only some of the concerns of a work that was years ahead of its time and is still valid, interesting and useful. Total in set: 94 figures.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780486203829
  • Publisher: Dover Publications
  • Publication date: 6/1/1950
  • Series: Notable American Authors Series
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 720
  • Sales rank: 299,116
  • Product dimensions: 5.42 (w) x 8.01 (h) x 1.34 (d)

Table of Contents

CHAPTER XVII. SENSATION
  Its distinction from perception
  Its cognitive function-acquaintance with qualities
  No pure sensations after the first days of life
  The 'relativity of knowledge'
  The law of contrast
  The psychological and the physiological theories of it
  Hering's experiments
  The 'eccentric projection' of sensations

CHAPTER XVIII. IMAGINATION
  Our images are usually vague
  Vague images not necessarily general notions
  Individuals differ in imagination ; Galton's researches
  The 'visile' type
  The 'audile' type
  The 'motile' type
  Tactile images
  The neural process of imagination
  Its relations to that of sensation
CHAPTER XIX. THE PERCEPTION OF 'THINGS'
  Perception and sensation
  Perception is of definite and probable things
  "Illusions;-of the first type, -of the second type"
  "The neural process in perception, 'Apperception'"
  Is perception an uncouscious inference?
  Hallucinations
  The neural process in hallucination
  Binet's theory
  Perception-time'
CHAPTER XX. THE PERCEPTION OF SPACE
  The feeling of crude extensity
  The perception of spatial order
  Space-'relations'
  The meaning of localization
  Local signs'
  The construction of 'real' space
  The subdivision of the original sense-spaces
  The sensation of motion over surfaces
  The measurement of the sense-spaces by each other
  Their summation
  Feelings of movement in joints
  Feelings of muscular contraction
  Summary so far
  How the blind perceive space
  Visual space
  Helmholtz and Reid on the test of a sensation
  The theory of identical points
  The theory of projection
  "Ambiguity of retinal impressions,-of eye-movements"
  The choice of the visual reality
  Sensations which we ignore
  Sensations which seem suppressed
  Discussion of Wundt's and Helmholtz's reasons for denying that retinal sensations are of extension
  Summary
  Historical remarks
CHAPTER XXI. THE PERCEPTION OF REALITY
  Belief and its opposites
  The various orders of reality
  Practical' realities
  The sense of our own bodily existence is the nucleus of all reality
  The paramount reality of sensations
  The influence of emotion and active impulse on belief
  Belief in theories
  Doubt
  Relations of belief and will
CHAPTER XXII. REASONING
  Recepts'
  "In reasoning, we pick out essential qualities"
  What is meant by a mode of conceiving
  What is involved in the existence of general propositions
  The two factors of reasoning
  Sagacity
  The part played by association by similarity
  The intellectual contrast between brute and man: association by similarity the fundamental human distinction
  Different orders of human genius
CHAPTER XXIII. THE PRODUCTION OF MOVEMENT
  The diffusive wave
  Every sensation produces reflex effects on the whole organism
CHAPTER XXIV. INSTINCT
  Its definition
  Instincts not always blind or invariable
  Two principles of non-uniformity in instincts:
  1) Their inhibition by habits
  2) Their transitoriness
  Man has more instincts than any other mammal
  Reflex impulses
  Imitation
  Emulation
  Pugnacity
  Sympathy
  The hunting instinct
  Fear
  Acquisitiveness
  Constructiveness
  Play
  Curiosity
  Sociability and shyness
  Secretiveness
  Cleanliness
  Shame
  Love
  Maternal love
CHAPTER XXV. THE EMOTIONS
  Instinctive reaction and emotional expression shade imperceptibly into each other
  The expression of grief; of fear; of hatred
  "Emotion is a consequence, not the cause, of the bodily expression"
  Difficulty of testing this view
  Objections to it discussed
  The subtler emotions
  No special brain-centres for emotion
  Emotional differences between individuals
  The genesis of the various emotions
CHAPTER XXVI. WILL
  Voluntary movements: they presuppose a memory of involuntary movements
  Kinæsthetic impressions
  No need to assume feelings of innervation
  The 'mental cue' for a movement may be an image of its visual or auditory effects as well as an image of the way it feels
  Ideo motor action
  Action after deliberation
  Five types of decision
  The feeling of effort
  Unhealthiness of will:
  1) The explosive type
  2) The obstructed type
  Pleasure and pain are not othe only springs of action
  All consciousness is impulsive
  What we will depends on what idea dominates in our mind
  The idea's outward effects follow from the cerebral machinery
  Effort of attention to a naturally repugnant idea is the essential feature of willing
  The free-will controversy
  "Psychology, as a science, can safely postulate determinism, even if free-will be true"
  The education of the Will
  Hypothetical brain-schemes
CHAPTER XXVII. HYPNOTISM
  Modes of operating and susceptibility
  Theories about the hypnotic state
  The symptoms of the trance
CHAPTER XXVIII. NECESSARY TRUTHS AND THE EFFECTS OF EXPERIENCE
  Programme of the chapter
  Elementary feelings are innate
  The question refers to their combinations
  What is meant by 'experience'
  Spencer on ancestral experience
  Two ways in which new cerebral structure arises: the 'back-door' and the 'front-door' way
  The genesis of the natural sciences
  Scientific conceptions arise as accidental variations
  The genesis of the pure sciences
  Series of evenly increasing terms
  The principle of mediate comparison
  That of skipped intermediaries
  Classification
  Predication
  Formal logic
  Mathematical propositions
  Arithmetic
  Geometry
  Our doctrine is the same as Locke's
  Relations of ideas v. couplings of things
  The natural sciences are inward ideal schemes with which the order of nature proves congruent
  Metaphysical principles are properly only postulates
  Æsthetic and moral principles are quite incongruent with the order of nature
  Summary of what precedes
  The origin of instincts
  Insufficiency of proof for the transmission to the next generation of acquired habits
  Weismann's views
  Conclusion

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