Principles of Wireless Access and Localization / Edition 1

Hardcover (Print)
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $94.49
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 24%)
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (13) from $94.49   
  • New (12) from $94.49   
  • Used (1) from $94.49   

Overview

A comprehensive, encompassing and accessible text examining a wide range of key Wireless Networking and Localization technologies

This book provides a unified treatment of issues related to all wireless access and wireless localization techniques. The book reflects principles of design and deployment of infrastructure for wireless access and localization for wide, local, and personal networking. Description of wireless access methods includes design and deployment of traditional TDMA and CDMA technologies and emerging Long Term Evolution (LTE) techniques for wide area cellular networks, the IEEE 802.11/WiFi wireless local area networks as well as IEEE 802.15 Bluetooth, ZigBee, Ultra Wideband (UWB), RF Microwave and body area networks used for sensor and ad hoc networks. The principles of wireless localization techniques using time-of-arrival and received-signal-strength of the wireless signal used in military and commercial applications in smart devices operating in urban, indoor and inside the human body localization are explained and compared.

Questions, problem sets and hands-on projects enhances the learning experience for students to understand and appreciate the subject. These include analytical and practical examples with software projects to challenge students in practically important simulation problems, and problem sets that use MatLab.

Key features:

  • Provides a broad coverage of main wireless technologies including emerging technical developments such as body area networking and cyber physical systems
  • Written in a tutorial form that can be used by students and researchers in the field
  • Includes practical examples and software projects to challenge students in practically important simulation problems
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780470697085
  • Publisher: Wiley
  • Publication date: 11/4/2013
  • Series: Wiley Desktop Editions Series
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 724
  • Sales rank: 1,214,533
  • Product dimensions: 6.60 (w) x 9.70 (h) x 1.70 (d)

Meet the Author

Kaveh Pahlavan, Professor of ECE, a Professor of CS, and Director of the Center for Wireless Information Network Studies at Worcester Polytechnic Institute. He is also a visiting Professor of Telecommunication Laboratory and Center for Wireless Communications at the University of Oulu, Finland. His area of research is location aware broadband sensor and ad hoc networks and he is the founder and Editor-in-Chief of the International Journal on Wireless Information Networks, the first journal in modern wireless networks established in 1994.

Prashant Krishnamurthy, Associate Professor for the graduate program in Telecommunications & Networking at the University of Pittsburgh, USA. His research interests include Wireless network security, wireless data networks, position location for wireless networks on which he has written numerous journal papers.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Preface xv

1 Introduction 1

1.1 Introduction 1

1.2 Elements of Information Networks 3

1.3 Evolution of Wireless Access to the PSTN 17

1.4 Evolution of Wireless Access to the Internet 21

1.5 Evolution of Wireless Localization Technologies 27

1.6 Structure of this Book 29

Part I PRINCIPLES OF AIR–INTERFERENCE DESIGN

2 Characteristics of the Wireless Medium 39

2.1 Introduction 39

2.2 Modeling of Large-scale RSS, Path Loss, and Shadow Fading 45

2.3 Modeling of RSS Fluctuations and Doppler Spectrum 60

2.4 Wideband Modeling of Multipath Characteristics 72

2.5 Emerging Channel Models 79

Appendix A2: What Is the Decibel? 84

3 Physical Layer Alternatives forWireless Networks 99

3.1 Introduction 99

3.2 Physical Layer Basics: Data rate, Bandwidth, and Power 100

3.3 Performance in Multipath Wireless Channels 107

3.4 Wireless Transmission Techniques 112

3.5 Multipath Resistant Techniques 120

3.6 Coding Techniques for Wireless Communications 136

3.7 Cognitive Radio and Dynamic Spectrum Access 145

Appendix A3 145

4 Medium Access Methods 153

4.1 Introduction 153

4.2 Centralized Assigned-Access Schemes 155

4.3 Distributed Random Access for Data Oriented Networks 173

4.4 Integration of Voice and Data Traffic 195

Part II PRINCIPLES OF NETWORK INFRASTRUCTURE DESIGN

5 Deployment ofWireless Networks 217

5.1 Introduction 217

5.2 Wireless Network Architectures 218

5.3 Interference in Wireless Networks 224

5.4 Deployment of Wireless LANs 233

5.5 Cellular Topology, Cell Fundamentals, and Frequency Reuse 238

5.6 Capacity Expansion Techniques 248

5.7 Network Planning for CDMA Systems 268

5.8 Femtocells 270

6 Wireless Network Operations 275

6.1 Introduction 275

6.2 Cell Search and Registration 281

6.3 Mobility Management 283

6.4 Radio Resources and Power Management 301

7 Wireless Network Security 321

7.1 Introduction 321

7.2 Security in Wireless Local Networks 324

7.3 Security in Wireless Personal Networks 330

7.4 Security in Wide Area Wireless Networks 334

7.5 Miscellaneous Issues 340

Appendix A7: An Overview of Cryptography and Cryptographic Protocols 341

Part III WIRELESS LOCAL ACCESS

8 Wireless LANs 357

8.1 Introduction 357

8.2 Wireless Local Area Networks and Standards 363

8.3 IEEE 802.11 WLAN Operations 369

9 Low Power Sensor Networks 405

9.1 Introduction 405

9.2 Bluetooth 406

9.3 IEEE 802.15.4 and ZigBee 424

9.4 IEEE 802.15.6 Body Area Networks 434

10 GigabitWireless 447

10.1 Introduction 447

10.2 UWB Communications at 3.1–10.6 GHz 451

10.3 Gigabit Wireless at 60 GHz 467

Part IV WIDE AREA WIRELESS ACCESS

11 TDMA Cellular Systems 479

11.1 Introduction 479

11.2 What is TDMA Cellular? 480

11.3 Mechanisms to Support a Mobile Environment 486

11.4 Communication Protocols 491

11.5 Channel Models for Cellular Networks 501

11.6 Transmission Techniques in TDMA Cellular 508

11.7 Evolution of TDMA for Internet Access 512

12 CDMA Cellular Systems 519

12.1 Introduction 519

12.2 Why CDMA? 520

12.3 CDMA Based Cellular Systems 521

12.4 Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum 522

12.5 Communication Channels and Protocols in Example CDMA Systems 534

12.6 Cell Search, Mobility, and Radio Resource Management in CDMA 546

12.7 High Speed Packet Access 554

13 OFDM and MIMO Cellular Systems 561

13.1 Introduction 561

13.2 Why OFDM? 562

13.3 Multiple Input Multiple Output 572

13.4 WiMax 576

13.5 Long Term Evolution 582

13.6 LTE Advanced 591

Part V WIRELESS LOCALIZATION

14 Geolocation Systems 597

14.1 Introduction 597

14.2 What is Wireless Geolocation? 598

14.3 RF Location Sensing and Positioning Methodologies 602

14.4 Location Services Architecture for Cellular Systems 613

14.5 Positioning in Ad Hoc and Sensor Networks 620

15 Fundamentals of RF Localization 625

15.1 Introduction 625

15.2 Modeling of the Behavior of RF Sensors 626

15.3 Performance Bounds for Ranging 631

15.4 Wireless Positioning Algorithms 639

16 Wireless Localization in Practice 653

16.1 Introduction 653

16.2 Emergence of Wi-Fi Localization 653

16.3 Comparison of Wi-Fi Localization Systems 657

16.4 Practical TOA Measurement 665

16.5 Localization in the Absence of DP 669

16.6 Challenges in Localization inside the Human Body 675

References 687

Index 701

Read More Show Less

Preface

Preface

Wireless networking has emerged as its own discipline over the past decade. From cellular voice telephony to wireless access to the Internet and wireless home networking, wireless networks have profoundly impacted our lifestyle. After a decade of exponential growth, today's wireless industry is one of the largest industries in the world. At the time of this writing, close to one billion people subscribe to cellular services, close to 200 billion GSM short messages are exchanged yearly, and the penetration of the cellular telephone in Finland exceeded 75%, the highest in the world. In response to this growth, a number of universities and other educational institutions have started wireless research and teaching programs and a number of engineers and scientists are re-educating themselves in this field. There are a number of recent textbooks in the general area of networking that also address some aspects of wireless networks. The treatment in these books is not adequate because design and analysis of wireless networks are very different from wired networks. In wireless networks the complexity resides in the design of air-interface and support of mobility, neither of which play a dominant role in wired networks. Therefore, we have always needed a comprehensive textbook on wireless networks that provides a deeper understanding of the issues specific to the wireless networks.

In 1995 when wireless networking was an emerging discipline, the principal author, along with Allen Levesque, wrote the first comprehensive textbook in Wireless Information Networks that addressed cellular and PCS systems as well as mobile data and wireless LANs. Wireless-related bookspublished prior to that book were focused on analog cellular systems. Wireless Information Networks covered 2G digital cellular systems, had significant emphasis on physical layer issues, and was written for students with background in electrical engineering, especially communications and signal processing. With the growth of the wireless industry in the latter part of the past decade, several books have emerged that explain the latest developments of specific standards or groups of standards like GSM, IS-95, W-CDMA, wireless LANs and Bluetooth. However, there is no textbook that integrates all the aspects of current wireless networks together. In this book, like the previous book, we address the need for a comprehensive treatment that provides a unified foundation of principles of all voice- and data-oriented wireless networks. The novelty of this book is that it covers 3G and wireless broadband ad hoc networking as well as 2G legacy systems, places emphasis on higher-layer communications issues, and is written for software and systems engineers as well as modern telecommunications engineers with electrical engineering or computer science backgrounds.

Traditionally, voice-oriented wireless networks have been the focus of books on wireless systems. However, with the exponential growth of the Internet, wireless data-oriented networks are also becoming very popular. The third generation (3G) wide area cellular systems are designed to support several hundreds of kbps with comprehensive coverage and up to 2 Mbps for local selected zones. Even before the emergence of 3G services, mobile data networks such as the general packet radio service (GPRS) over TDMA systems and high-speed packet data over CDMA systems are becoming increasingly popular. At the same time, after the introduction of Bluetooth technology in 1998, local broadband and ad hoc wireless networks have attracted tremendous attention. This sector of the wireless networking industry includes the traditional wireless local area networks (WLANs) and the emerging wireless personal area networks (WPANs). Wireless broadband and ad hoc networking is expected to create a revolution in the future of Internet access, home networking, and wireless consumer products. While there is a plurality of standards and a differentiation between voice and data networks, the essential aspects of wireless systems remain the same. We see that wireless networks share a common foundation in the design of the physical layer, medium access, network planning and deployment, and network operation. Principles of Wireless Networks: A Unified Approach emphasizes this similarity hidden in the diversity of wireless networks.

The structure and sequence of material for this book was first formed in a lecture series by the principal author at Digital Equipment Corporation in 1996. The principal author also taught shorter versions of the course focused on broadband and ad hoc networking in several conferences and industrial forums. The core of the book is based on presentation material and reference papers prepared by the principal author for a course called "Wireless Mobile Data Networks" first taught in spring 1999 as a fourteen-week, 3 hour/week graduate course at Worcester Polytechnic Institute, Massachusetts. In summer 1999, he also taught another ten-week, 3 hour/week, version of the course titled "Advances in Wireless Networks" at the University of Oulu, Finland. The co-author of the book has taught material from this book in spring 2000 and summer 2001 at the University of Pittsburgh in a course entitled Mobile Data Networks. These courses were taught for students with electrical engineering, computer science, and networking backgrounds, both from the academia and the industry.

Providing an overall organization for understanding both legacy voice-oriented and emerging data-oriented wireless networks for a diverse audience comprising managers, engineers, scientists, and students who need to understand this industry is very challenging. If we provide an in-depth treatment of specific topics related to the air-interface, such as channel modeling or modem design, we lose the overall systems-engineering perception. If we avoid the details of air-interface, there will be no wireless content, as this forms the core of the difference between wireless and wired networks. Our approach has been to try striking a balance between intuitive understanding of the wireless medium and detailed aspects of the system. We divide the topics in three categories: (1) overview, comparative evaluation, and logical classification of important standards, (2) explanation of principles of design and analysis of wireless networks, and (3) detailed description of important wireless systems. Overview of the popular standards is treated in Chapter one. Principles of wireless network design and analysis is divided into principles of air-interface design (Chapters 2-4) and principles of network deployment and operation (Chapters 5-6). System descriptions are divided into two parts covering legacy wide area wireless networks (Chapters 7-9) and emerging broadband local and ad hoc wireless networks (Chapters 10-14). The partitioned structure of the book allows flexibility in teaching the material and makes it easier for the text to be used as a reference book as well. Therefore, depending on selection of the material, depth of the coverage, and background of the students, this book can be used for senior undergraduate or first- or second-year graduate courses in computer science (CS), telecommunications, electrical and computer engineering (ECE), or electrical engineering (EE) departments as one course or a sequence of two courses.

In the last offering of the course at WPI to ECE and CS students, the first two weeks were devoted to the introduction of wireless networks. The first week was a lecture entitled "Overview of Wireless Networks" from Chapter 1 that provided the overall structure of the standards and trends in wireless networks. The second week was a lecture on "Overview of Networking Aspects" from Chapter 5 that clarified the technical issues that are related to wireless networks. The next part of the course (about six weeks) involved the detailed technical aspects of wireless networks. This part began with a lecture on "Characteristics of Wireless Medium" from Chapter 2. The next lectures in this sequence were from Chapter 5, "Principles of Network Planning" that spanned two weeks. This was followed by "PHY Layer Alternatives" from Chapter 3 that together with the next lecture on "Medium Access Alternatives" took three weeks. At this stage students were ready to understand the details of standards so that a two-week lecture on "GSM--An Example of TDMA Technology" could follow. This was a detailed treatment of an overall structure of GSM from Chapter 7. This lecture was followed by a one-week lecture on "CDMA Technology: IS-95 and IMT-2000" from Chapter 8. Wireless broadband and ad hoc networks formed the last four weeks of the course with the first lecture on "Wireless LANs and IEEE 802.11" from Chapters 10 and 11 followed by a one-week lecture from Chapters 12 and 13 on "Voice-Oriented HIPERLAN-2 and Bluetooth." We spent approximately two weeks on administration of the exams and presentations by students. The students had weekly homework that consisted of a set of questions and some problems relevant to the lecture. They were also required to do a mandatory project on handoff and an optional term paper.

The Finnish version taught at the University of Oulu to EE and CS students roughly covered the same material in ten three-hour lectures. In a period of several months after the lectures, two examinations were arranged, and the students performed a project mandated for completion of the course. The emphasis on lectures in Finland was on the last part of the book as students had prior exposure to GSM and W-CDMA systems. The principal author has also used the last five chapters of this book with parts of Stalling's book Local & Metropolitan Area Networks in a 30-hour lecture course entitled "Wired and Wireless LANs" at the University of Oulu for students from university and the industry in the summer of 2001. The flexibility in using the book can be seen from the course "Mobile Data Networks" taught by the co-author of the book in spring 2000 and summer 2001 at the University of Pittsburgh. The course spanned a quick review of the first part of the book and some parts of Chapter 7 followed by Chapters 9-14 that primarily considered wireless data networks.

Most of the writing and preparations of the principal author took place in several months of his teachings and scholarship at the University of Oulu, Finland, as the first non-Finn Nokia Fellow in 1999 and the first Fulbright-Nokia scholar in 2000. He would like to express his deep appreciation to Nokia Foundation, Fulbright Foundation, University of Oulu, and Worcester Polytechnic Institute for allowing these opportunities to occur. In particular he appreciates the help of Prof. Pentti Leppanen, director of the Telecommunication Laboratory at the University of Oulu, for his continual encouragement and creative administrative support and Dr. Yrjo Neuvo, Executive VP and CTO of Nokia Mobile Phone, for his support through the Nokia Foundation. Also, he appreciates Prof. John Orr, Head of the ECE department, and Provost John Carney, Vice President of Academic Affairs of WPI for their support and understanding, in particular during the Fulbright-Nokia scholarship period. The co-author's involvement in this project began during his stay at CWINS in WPI and extended into his current position at the University of Pittsburgh. At the University of Pittsburgh, he has been involved in the Wireless Information Systems track in the Master of Science in Telecommunications with Profs. David Tipper and Joseph Kabara, who have helped him immensely in his teaching and research work. The director of the Telecommunications Program at the University of Pittsburgh, Prof. Richard Thompson, and the chair of the Department of Information Science and Telecommunications, Prof. Martin Weiss, have fostered an environment that supports innovation and freedom, which has been a significant reason behind the co-author's ability to contribute to this book. He would also like to thank his colleagues, Profs. Sujata Banerjee and Taieb Znati for their support during the last two years in his academic efforts.

Read More Show Less

Introduction

Preface

Wireless networking has emerged as its own discipline over the past decade. From cellular voice telephony to wireless access to the Internet and wireless home networking, wireless networks have profoundly impacted our lifestyle. After a decade of exponential growth, today's wireless industry is one of the largest industries in the world. At the time of this writing, close to one billion people subscribe to cellular services, close to 200 billion GSM short messages are exchanged yearly, and the penetration of the cellular telephone in Finland exceeded 75%, the highest in the world. In response to this growth, a number of universities and other educational institutions have started wireless research and teaching programs and a number of engineers and scientists are re-educating themselves in this field. There are a number of recent textbooks in the general area of networking that also address some aspects of wireless networks. The treatment in these books is not adequate because design and analysis of wireless networks are very different from wired networks. In wireless networks the complexity resides in the design of air-interface and support of mobility, neither of which play a dominant role in wired networks. Therefore, we have always needed a comprehensive textbook on wireless networks that provides a deeper understanding of the issues specific to the wireless networks.

In 1995 when wireless networking was an emerging discipline, the principal author, along with Allen Levesque, wrote the first comprehensive textbook in Wireless Information Networks that addressed cellular and PCS systems as well as mobile data and wireless LANs. Wireless-related bookspublished prior to that book were focused on analog cellular systems. Wireless Information Networks covered 2G digital cellular systems, had significant emphasis on physical layer issues, and was written for students with background in electrical engineering, especially communications and signal processing. With the growth of the wireless industry in the latter part of the past decade, several books have emerged that explain the latest developments of specific standards or groups of standards like GSM, IS-95, W-CDMA, wireless LANs and Bluetooth. However, there is no textbook that integrates all the aspects of current wireless networks together. In this book, like the previous book, we address the need for a comprehensive treatment that provides a unified foundation of principles of all voice- and data-oriented wireless networks. The novelty of this book is that it covers 3G and wireless broadband ad hoc networking as well as 2G legacy systems, places emphasis on higher-layer communications issues, and is written for software and systems engineers as well as modern telecommunications engineers with electrical engineering or computer science backgrounds.

Traditionally, voice-oriented wireless networks have been the focus of books on wireless systems. However, with the exponential growth of the Internet, wireless data-oriented networks are also becoming very popular. The third generation (3G) wide area cellular systems are designed to support several hundreds of kbps with comprehensive coverage and up to 2 Mbps for local selected zones. Even before the emergence of 3G services, mobile data networks such as the general packet radio service (GPRS) over TDMA systems and high-speed packet data over CDMA systems are becoming increasingly popular. At the same time, after the introduction of Bluetooth technology in 1998, local broadband and ad hoc wireless networks have attracted tremendous attention. This sector of the wireless networking industry includes the traditional wireless local area networks (WLANs) and the emerging wireless personal area networks (WPANs). Wireless broadband and ad hoc networking is expected to create a revolution in the future of Internet access, home networking, and wireless consumer products. While there is a plurality of standards and a differentiation between voice and data networks, the essential aspects of wireless systems remain the same. We see that wireless networks share a common foundation in the design of the physical layer, medium access, network planning and deployment, and network operation. Principles of Wireless Networks: A Unified Approach emphasizes this similarity hidden in the diversity of wireless networks.

The structure and sequence of material for this book was first formed in a lecture series by the principal author at Digital Equipment Corporation in 1996. The principal author also taught shorter versions of the course focused on broadband and ad hoc networking in several conferences and industrial forums. The core of the book is based on presentation material and reference papers prepared by the principal author for a course called "Wireless Mobile Data Networks" first taught in spring 1999 as a fourteen-week, 3 hour/week graduate course at Worcester Polytechnic Institute, Massachusetts. In summer 1999, he also taught another ten-week, 3 hour/week, version of the course titled "Advances in Wireless Networks" at the University of Oulu, Finland. The co-author of the book has taught material from this book in spring 2000 and summer 2001 at the University of Pittsburgh in a course entitled Mobile Data Networks. These courses were taught for students with electrical engineering, computer science, and networking backgrounds, both from the academia and the industry.

Providing an overall organization for understanding both legacy voice-oriented and emerging data-oriented wireless networks for a diverse audience comprising managers, engineers, scientists, and students who need to understand this industry is very challenging. If we provide an in-depth treatment of specific topics related to the air-interface, such as channel modeling or modem design, we lose the overall systems-engineering perception. If we avoid the details of air-interface, there will be no wireless content, as this forms the core of the difference between wireless and wired networks. Our approach has been to try striking a balance between intuitive understanding of the wireless medium and detailed aspects of the system. We divide the topics in three categories: (1) overview, comparative evaluation, and logical classification of important standards, (2) explanation of principles of design and analysis of wireless networks, and (3) detailed description of important wireless systems. Overview of the popular standards is treated in Chapter one. Principles of wireless network design and analysis is divided into principles of air-interface design (Chapters 2-4) and principles of network deployment and operation (Chapters 5-6). System descriptions are divided into two parts covering legacy wide area wireless networks (Chapters 7-9) and emerging broadband local and ad hoc wireless networks (Chapters 10-14). The partitioned structure of the book allows flexibility in teaching the material and makes it easier for the text to be used as a reference book as well. Therefore, depending on selection of the material, depth of the coverage, and background of the students, this book can be used for senior undergraduate or first- or second-year graduate courses in computer science (CS), telecommunications, electrical and computer engineering (ECE), or electrical engineering (EE) departments as one course or a sequence of two courses.

In the last offering of the course at WPI to ECE and CS students, the first two weeks were devoted to the introduction of wireless networks. The first week was a lecture entitled "Overview of Wireless Networks" from Chapter 1 that provided the overall structure of the standards and trends in wireless networks. The second week was a lecture on "Overview of Networking Aspects" from Chapter 5 that clarified the technical issues that are related to wireless networks. The next part of the course (about six weeks) involved the detailed technical aspects of wireless networks. This part began with a lecture on "Characteristics of Wireless Medium" from Chapter 2. The next lectures in this sequence were from Chapter 5, "Principles of Network Planning" that spanned two weeks. This was followed by "PHY Layer Alternatives" from Chapter 3 that together with the next lecture on "Medium Access Alternatives" took three weeks. At this stage students were ready to understand the details of standards so that a two-week lecture on "GSM--An Example of TDMA Technology" could follow. This was a detailed treatment of an overall structure of GSM from Chapter 7. This lecture was followed by a one-week lecture on "CDMA Technology: IS-95 and IMT-2000" from Chapter 8. Wireless broadband and ad hoc networks formed the last four weeks of the course with the first lecture on "Wireless LANs and IEEE 802.11" from Chapters 10 and 11 followed by a one-week lecture from Chapters 12 and 13 on "Voice-Oriented HIPERLAN-2 and Bluetooth." We spent approximately two weeks on administration of the exams and presentations by students. The students had weekly homework that consisted of a set of questions and some problems relevant to the lecture. They were also required to do a mandatory project on handoff and an optional term paper.

The Finnish version taught at the University of Oulu to EE and CS students roughly covered the same material in ten three-hour lectures. In a period of several months after the lectures, two examinations were arranged, and the students performed a project mandated for completion of the course. The emphasis on lectures in Finland was on the last part of the book as students had prior exposure to GSM and W-CDMA systems. The principal author has also used the last five chapters of this book with parts of Stalling's book Local & Metropolitan Area Networks in a 30-hour lecture course entitled "Wired and Wireless LANs" at the University of Oulu for students from university and the industry in the summer of 2001. The flexibility in using the book can be seen from the course "Mobile Data Networks" taught by the co-author of the book in spring 2000 and summer 2001 at the University of Pittsburgh. The course spanned a quick review of the first part of the book and some parts of Chapter 7 followed by Chapters 9-14 that primarily considered wireless data networks.

Most of the writing and preparations of the principal author took place in several months of his teachings and scholarship at the University of Oulu, Finland, as the first non-Finn Nokia Fellow in 1999 and the first Fulbright-Nokia scholar in 2000. He would like to express his deep appreciation to Nokia Foundation, Fulbright Foundation, University of Oulu, and Worcester Polytechnic Institute for allowing these opportunities to occur. In particular he appreciates the help of Prof. Pentti Leppanen, director of the Telecommunication Laboratory at the University of Oulu, for his continual encouragement and creative administrative support and Dr. Yrjo Neuvo, Executive VP and CTO of Nokia Mobile Phone, for his support through the Nokia Foundation. Also, he appreciates Prof. John Orr, Head of the ECE department, and Provost John Carney, Vice President of Academic Affairs of WPI for their support and understanding, in particular during the Fulbright-Nokia scholarship period. The co-author's involvement in this project began during his stay at CWINS in WPI and extended into his current position at the University of Pittsburgh. At the University of Pittsburgh, he has been involved in the Wireless Information Systems track in the Master of Science in Telecommunications with Profs. David Tipper and Joseph Kabara, who have helped him immensely in his teaching and research work. The director of the Telecommunications Program at the University of Pittsburgh, Prof. Richard Thompson, and the chair of the Department of Information Science and Telecommunications, Prof. Martin Weiss, have fostered an environment that supports innovation and freedom, which has been a significant reason behind the co-author's ability to contribute to this book. He would also like to thank his colleagues, Profs. Sujata Banerjee and Taieb Znati for their support during the last two years in his academic efforts.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)