Privacy-Enhanced Business

Overview

With more than 200 million people online and their numbers on the rise, growing also is a perceived threat to personal privacy. A trend toward consumer protective legislation is developing in Europe and shows signs of developing in the U.S. Frye examines the new online environment, the national and international legislative scenarios that could affect the way online business is done, and proposes steps that would allow organizations to determine the policies best for themselves within privacy-enhanced ...

See more details below
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (1) from $125.66   
  • New (1) from $125.66   
Sending request ...

Overview

With more than 200 million people online and their numbers on the rise, growing also is a perceived threat to personal privacy. A trend toward consumer protective legislation is developing in Europe and shows signs of developing in the U.S. Frye examines the new online environment, the national and international legislative scenarios that could affect the way online business is done, and proposes steps that would allow organizations to determine the policies best for themselves within privacy-enhanced environments. He lays out the privacy interests and concerns of Internet users in the context of privacy laws in Europe, Canada, and the U.S. Then, without demonizing or lionizing them, he looks impartially at how corporations could and might have to function under a variety of likely legislations. Frye's book, among the first to attempt the task, is a timely, much needed advisory—and warning—for top echelon executives in the public and private sectors both, particularly in marketing and sales, areas where privacy activists are concentrating their efforts. It is also an important source of information and thought for academics and their graduate-level students.

Frye introduces the Internet as a social and technological phenomenon by recounting briefly the early days of its predecessor, ARPANet. In the next chapters he fills in the policy background from a legal standpoint, explaining the thrust toward privacy that emerged through Supreme Court and lower court decisions. He then examines Internet economics, and from there turns to Internet-based advertising. He also covers the controversy over cookies and shows what Web users can do to visit Web sites without leaving crumbs. He introduces the infomediary, a type of organization that could allow consumers to maintain anonymity while still granting businesses access to detailed demographic and behavioral information. Frye describes a range of scenarios that could be played out over the next decade and offers specific steps that organizations can take to improve consumer confidence, maintain the flow of information they need, yet still demonstrate their compliance with consumer expectations as well as the law. Two appendices contain the full text of two documents vital to senior managers mapping their own corporate strategies: the European Union Data Directive and an EU Work Paper on the use of contracts to ensure the security of personally identifiable information that is transferred from the EU to other countries, such as the U.S., that lack their own adequate protections.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Booknews
The Internet is making it possible for businesses to collect more data about their customers than ever before. At the same time, consumers are becoming more sensitive to personal privacy issues, with the US making moves to follow Europe in adapting consumer-protection regulations for cyberspace. Frye, an e-commerce and policy analyst, provides advice to help companies maintain good relationships with their customers while doing business in an increasingly interconnected world. He describes the range of legislative scenarios that could occur in the next decade and sets out concrete steps that businesses can take to maintain the flow of information about their customers while improving consumer confidence and complying with consumer expectations as well as the law. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781567203219
  • Publisher: ABC-Clio, LLC
  • Publication date: 12/30/2000
  • Pages: 262
  • Product dimensions: 6.14 (w) x 9.21 (h) x 0.63 (d)

Meet the Author

CURTIS D. FRYE is Principal of Technology & Society, LLC, an electronic commerce and policy analysis firm in Portland, Oregon.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Figures and Tables
Preface
Introduction 1
1 The Internet as Business Environment 5
2 Domestic Law 31
3 The European Union and Other Nations 51
4 Differences Between U.S. and European Law 75
5 Internet Economics 85
6 Internet Advertising 105
7 User Tracking Technologies 123
8 Privacy-Enhancing Technologies 163
9 Policy Scenarios 193
Appendix A 203
Appendix B 231
Index 243
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)